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THE 



WILTSHIRE 

Archaeological & Natural History 

MAGAZINE. 



FORMED IN THAT COUNTY, A.D. 1853. 

Edited by Rev. E. H. Goddard, Clyffe Vicarage, Swindon. 

VOL. XL. 

1917—1918—1919. 




DEVIZES : 

C. H. Woodward, Exchange Buildings, Station Road. 



December, 1919. 



CONTENTS OF VOL. XL, 



No. CXXVII. December, 1917. 

The Sixty-Fourth General Meeting at Devizes 1 — 5 

Early Bronze Age Interment at the Central Flying School, 

Upavon .' 6—7 

Notes on the Skeleton found in an Early Bronze- Age-Burial at 

Upavon : By Arthur Keith, M.D., F.R.S 8—11 

Lidbury Camp. Being an account of excavations carried out by 

Mr. and Mrs. B. H. Cunnington in 1914 12—36 

WiltshireNewspapers— Past and Present. Parti.: ByJ.J.SLAPE 37—74 

Wilts Obituary -.. 75—83 

Recent Wiltshire Books, Pamphlets, Articles, &c .-. 84—92 

Additions to Museum and Library 93—94 

No. CXXVIII. June, 1918. 

Durrington Walls, or Long Walls : By P. Farrer 95— J03 

The Church of S. Michael, Brinkworth, Wilts : By C. E. Ponting, 

F.S.A 104—109 

Customs of the Manor of Purton (cir. 1597) : Transcribed by 

Canon F. H. Manley no— 118 

Perambulation of Purton, 1733; Transcribed by Mrs. T Story 

Maskelyne 119-128 

Wiltshire Newspapers— Past and Present. Part II. : By J. J. 

Slade 129—141 

The Lavington Manual {Manuale Ad Usum Sarum) MS. XIII. , 

XIV., XV. Centuries. By Eustace F. Bosanquet 142—147 

The Buckler Collection of Wiltshire Drawings 148—190 

Drawings of Wiltshire Churches: By O. B. Carter, 1847—50 ... 190-191 

Wiltshire Deeds Recently Acquired 192 

Wilts Obituary , 1 93— 202 

Additions to Library , 202—203 

Accounts of the Society for the Year 1917 204—207 

No. CXXIX. December, 1918 

Existing Materials for Wiltshire Bibliography : By the Rev. E. 

H. GoDDARD ..... 209- 232, 272 

East Wiltshire Mosses, Hepatics, and Land Shells : By Cecil P. 

Hurst 231—249 

The Sixty-Fifth General Meeting at Devizes 250—252 

The Church Survey in Wilts, 1649— 50 : Communicated by the 

Ven. Archdeacon E. J. Bodington (continued) 253—272 

Wilts Obituary 273-~279 

Wiltshire Books, Pamphlets, and Articles , . 280 — 288 

Books, Pamphlets, and Articles by Wiltshire Authors 288—293 

Wiltshire Illustrations „ 293 — 295 

Additions to Library 295 



IV. CONTENTS OE VOL. XL. 



No. CXXX. June, 1919. 



The Church Survey in Wilts, 1649 — 50 : [Parliamentary Surveys 
(Lambeth), Vol. XIV., &c] : Communicated by the Ven. 

Archdeacon E. J. Bodinqton (continued) 297—317 

Wiltshire Newspapers, Past and Present. Part III. The News- 
papers of South Wilts : By Mrs. Herbert Richardson, B.A., 

sometime Scholar of St. Hugh's College, Oxford 318—351 

Notes 352—368 

Wilts Obituary 369—374 

Additions to Museum and Library 374 — 375 

Accounts of the Society for the Year 1918 ." 376 — 379 

List of Officers and Members of the Society 380—388 



No, CXXXI. December 1919. 

The Sixty-Sixth General Meeting at Devizes..... 389—391 

The Church Survey in Wilts, 1649—1650 : [Parliamentary Surveys 

(Lambeth), Vol. XIV., &c] : Communicated by the Ven. 

Archdeacon E. J. Bodington (continued) 392 — 416 

The Early Norman Castle at Devizes: By E. Herbert Stone... 417—429 

Wilts Obituary 430—432 

Wiltshire Books, Pamphlets, and Articles 433—445 

Wiltshire Portraits 446 — 451 

Wiltshire Illustrations 451 — 453 

Additions to the Museum and Library 453—454 

Index to Vol. XL. 455—522 



Illustrations. 

Figs. 1, 2, and 3, Skull found at Upavon, 1915, 9. Plan of Lidbury Camp, 
27. Plans and Sections of Lidbury (4 plates), 28. Pottery from Lidbury 
Camp (4 plates), 30. Objects from Excavations at Lidbury Camp (2, 
plates), 34. Durrington Walls, Ground Plan, 96. .Durrington Walls. 
Sections, 97. Sketch Plan of the Boundaries of Purton Parish, 122. 
The Lavington Manuale, 142. 



W 8 8 OCT MB 



No. CXXVII. DEC, 1917. Vol. XL 



THE 

WILTSHIKE 

Archaeological & Natural History 

MAGAZINE, 

Published under the Direction of the 

SOCIETY FOEMED IN THAT COUNTY, 
AD. 1853. 



EDITED BY 

REV. E. H. GODDARD, Clyffe Vicarage, Swindon. 




DEVIZES : 

Printed and sold foe the Society by C. H. Woodward, 
Exchange Buildings, Station Road. 



Price 5s. 6d. Members, Gratis, 



NOTICE TO MEMBEES. 
TAKE NOTICE, that a copious Index for the preceding eight 
volumes of the Magazine will be found at the end of Vols, 
viii., xvi., xxiv., and xxxii. The subsequent Volumes are 
each indexed separately. 

Members who have not paid their Subscriptions to the Society for 
the current year, are requested to remit the same forthwith to 
the Financial Secretary, Mr. David Owen, Bank Chambers, 
Devizes, to whom also all communications as to the supply 
of Magazines should be addressed. 

The Annual Subscription to the Society is 10/6, with an entrance 
fee of 10/6. The Composition for Life Membership is £10 10s. 

The Numbers of this Magazine will be delivered gratis, as issued, 
to Members who are not in arrear of their Annual Subscrip- 
tions, but in accordance with Byelaw No. 8 " The Financial 
Secretary shall give notice to Members in arrear, and the 
Society's publications will not be forwarded to Members whose 
Subscriptions shall remain unpaid after such notice." 

All other communications to be addressed to the Honorary Secre- 
tary : the Eev. E. H. Goddard, Clyffe Vicarage, Swindon, 

THE SOCIETY'S PUBLICATIONS. 

To be obtained of Mr. D. OWEN, Bank Chambers, Devizes. 

THE BRITISH AND ROMAN ANTIQUITIES OF THE NORTH 
WILTSHIRE DOWNS, by the Rev, A, 0. Smith, M.A, One Volume, Atlas 
4to, 248 pp., 17 large Maps, and 110 Woodcuts, Extra Cloth. Price £2 2s. 
One copy offered to each Member of the Society at £1 lis. 6d. 

THE FLOWERING PLANTS OF WILTSHIRE. One Volume, 8vo, 
504 pp., with Map, Cloth. By the Rev, T. A. Preston, M.A. Price to the 
Public, 16s. ; but one copy offered to every Member of the Society at half-price. 

CATALOGUE of the STOURHEAD COLLECTION of ANTIQUITIES 
in the SOCIETY'S MUSEUM, with 175 Illustrations. Part I. Price Is. 6d. 

CATALOGUE of ANTIQUITIES in the SOCIETY'S MUSEUM. 
Part II. 1911. Fully illustrated. Price 2s, 

CATALOGUE of the SOCIETY'S LIBRARY at the MUSEUM, 
Price Is. APPENDIX No. I., II., and III., 3d. each. 

CATALOGUE of DRAWINGS, PRINTS, and Maps, in the SOCIETY'S 
LIBRARY at the MUSEUM. Price Is. 6d. 

CATALOGUE of WILTSHIRE TRADE TOKENS in the SOCIETY'S 
COLLECTION. Price 6d. 

BACK NUMBERS of the MAGAZINE. Price to the Public, 5s. 6d. and 
3s. 6d. (except in the case of a few numbers, the price of which is raised). 
Members are allowed a reduction of 25 per cent, from these prices. 



WILTSHIRE 
Archaeological & Natural History 

MAGAZINE. 



No. CXXVII. DEC, 1917. Vol. XL. 



Contents. 



PAGE 



The Sixty-Fourth General Meeting at Devices 1 — 5 

Early Bronze Age Interment at the Central Flying School, 

Upavon 6—6 

Notes on the Skeleton found in an Early Bronze- Age-Burial 

at Upavon, 1915: By Arthur Keith, M.D., F.R.S 8—11 

Lidbury Camp. Being an account of excavations carried out by Mr. 

and Mrs. B. H. Cunnington in 1914 12—36 

Wiltshire Newspapers— Past and Present. Part I. By J. J. 

Slade 37—74 

Wilts Obituary 75—83 

Recent Wiltshire Books, Pamphlets, Articles, &c 84—92 

Additions to Museum and Library 93 — 94 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 

Figs. 1, 2, and 3, Skull found at Upavon, 1915 9 

Plan of Lidbury Camp 27 

Plans and Sections of Lidbury (4 plates) ... 28 

Pottery from Lidbury Camp (4 plates) 30 

Objects from Excavations at Lidbury Camp (2 plates) 34 



Devizes :— C. H. Woodward, Exchange Buildings, Station Road. 



THE 

WILTSHIRE MAGAZINE. 



" MULTOEUM MANIBUS GRANDE LEVATUE ONUS." — Ovid. 

No. CXXVII. December, 1917. 

THE SIXTY-FOURTH GENERAL MEETING 

OF 

THE WILTSHIRE ARCHAEOLOGICAL AND NATURAL 

HISTORY SOCIETY, 

HELD AT DEVIZES MUSEUM, August 7th, 1917. 

In consequence of the continuance of the war a General Meeting 
for business only was called on Tuesday, August 7th, 1917, at 2 
o'clock. Only a small number of members were present, the 
President, Mr. W. Heward Bell, F.S A., F.G.S, being in the chair. 
Beyond the reception of the annual report there was little business 
to do. The Hon. Secretary, however, reported that a considerable 
effort had been made to beat up new members since the last Com- 
mittee meeting, with the fairly satisfactory result that fourteen 
new members were elected at the meeting and the names of several 
others were suggested who might be asked to join the Society. It 
would be a great help if members who happen to know of new 
residents in their own neighbourhoods whom they may not care 
to ask to join the Society themselves, would take the trouble to 
send their names and addresses on a postcard to the Hon. Secretary, 
who will then write and ask them. 

THE REPORT. 

The following is the text of the annual report read by the Hon. 
Secretary : — 

The Committee beg to present the sixty-fourth annual report of 
the Society for the year 1916-17. 

VOL. XL. — NO. CXXVII. B 



2 The Sixty-Fourth General Meeting. 

Members. — The diminution in numbers noticeable since the be- 
ginning of the war, has continued during the past year. The 
Society began the year with a total of 326, and ends it with a total 
of 313, of whom 12 are life members and 301 annual subscribers, 
having lost one life member and nine annual subscribers by death, 
and 15 annual subscribers by resignation ; whilst only ten new 
members were elected. There is thus a net loss of 13 members 
during the year. By the death of Mr, H. E. Medlicott the Society 
has lost not merely one of its vice-presidents, but one who for 
many years acted as one of the honorary secretaries of the Society 
and was responsible for the arrangements of the annual excursions. 
Though he had resigned that office for some years past, he remained 
to the last one of the most active members of the committee, always 
ready to help on the work and interests of the Society in every 
way that he could. In the case of our own Society as in that of so 
many other institutions in North Wilts his death has left a gap 
which will not easily be filled. By the death of Mr. C. H, Talbot, 
of Lacock, too, the Society has lost another of its most prominent 
members, who acted as honorary secretary for five years from 1875 
to 1881, and as president of the Society from 1897 to 1899. Until 
his health no longer permitted his presence he was one of the most 
regular attendants both at the annual meetings and at the quarterly 
committee meetings, and took a leading part in the proceedings. 
A third loss is that of Mr. Edward Cook, to whose interest and 
care the foundation of the collection of Wiltshire Lepidoptera at 
the Museum is due. Up to the time of his death he acted as 
curator of this collection, and one of the most pressing needs of the 
Society at this moment is an entomologist who will take his place 
and carry on his work in the Museum collection. Obituary notices 
of all three members are to be found in the Magazine. 

Finance. — The Society's accounts, which will be published in the 
" June " number of the Magazine, now due, show that on January 
1st, 1916, there was a balance on the General Account of £56 19s. 9d. 
The final instalment of £11 Is. lid. was repaid by the Museum 
Enlargement Fund to the General Fund, this being the balance of 
the £50 borrowed from the General Fund in 1912. The Museum 



The Report. 3 

Maintenance Fund also repaid £6 5s. 2d. of the sum borrowed from 
the General Fund to pay for the repairs of the roof of the Museum. 
There was at the end of the year 1916 a balance of £64 13s. Q\d. 
to the credit of the General Account, or £7 13s. 9^d. more than 
at the end of the previous year. The Museum Maintenance Fund, 
which showed a balance at the beginning of the year of £7 6s. Qd., 
received during the year £31 4s. Qd. from subscriptions, and 
£4 19s. 1\d. from admissions and donations at the Museum, both 
these items being slightly less than the corresponding amounts 
received in 1915. On the other hand a larger sum, £1 8s. Qd., 
was received from the sale of catalogues. The chief extra expenses 
were the replacement of the boiler for the heating apparatus, at a 
cost of £10 4s., and the insurance against aircraft, which cost £3 10s, 
The balance in hand at the end of the year was £7 4s. 10^., or 
Is. 8d. less than that with which the year began. On this fund, 
therefore, the receipts and expenditure almost exactly balanced 
each other. It has to be remembered, however, that there is still 
a debt due from this fund to the General Fund for money borrowed 
for the repairs of the roof. The Museum Enlargement Fund has 
for several years been entirely absorbed in repaying the loan from 
the General Fund of £50 in 1912, but as the last instalment of 
this was paid during 1916, and there was a balance of £2 0s. 9d. 
at the end of the year, it is hoped that this fund, which is derived 
from the rent of the caretaker's house, may now gradually accumulate 
and form a nucleus of a fund for future enlargement. On the 
whole, therefore, the financial condition of the Society at the end 
of the year 1916 was a satisfactory improvement on its condition 
at the end of 1915. The fund raised for the purchase of the Brooke 
Collection in the previous year, which is quite separate from the 
other funds, after the final payment for the fitting up of the new 
cases at the Museum, showed a balance of £20 10s. lid. in hand. 
This has been invested in the War Savings Association as the 
nucleus of a new fund, to be called " The Museum Purchase Fund," 
which shall be available in the future for the purchase of Wiltshire 
objects for the Museum, 

The Museum and Library. — There have been no such sensational 

B 2 



4 The Sixty-Fourth General Meeting. 

additions to the Museum collections during the year as the Brooke 
Collection provided in 1915-16, but during the residence of the 
Curator and Mrs. Cunnington at Devizes, for several months this 
year, considerable progress has been made by the latter in the 
arrangement and labelling of this collection. The pottery and 
other objects found by Captain and Mrs. Cunnington during their 
excavation at Lidbury in 1914, have been given by them to the 
Museum and placed in the cases. Mr, Brooke has also given 
several recent finds to be added to the cases containing his col- 
lection. In accordance with the resolution passed at the last 
general meeting, that various objects which have no connection 
with Wiltshire should be sold to make room for purely local col- 
lections, the Victoria and Albert Museum has purchased a copper- 
gilt chalice for £8 8s. ; the Cambridge Museum has taken certain of 
the ethnological objects for £20 10s. ; and Professor S. H. Reynolds 
has bought the whole of the non-Wiltshire and duplicate fossils for 
the Bristol University collection at £23. These fossils, some of 
which had never been unpacked from the boxes in which they 
came to the Museum 30 or 40 years ago, comprised many admirable 
specimens from the Continent and from other parts of England, 
which will be of very considerable value in a general geological 
collection, and it is a cause for satisfaction that they have been so 
usefully disposed of. So far as our own Museum is concerned 
they filled a great number of boxes under the cases of the Stourhead 
room, and crowded the drawers of the cabinets in the Natural 
History Room, which are now available for the proper exhibition 
of Wiltshire specimens. The sums derived from the sale of these 
various objects have been added to the balance of the " Brooke 
Collection Fund " to form the new " Museum Purchase Fund." 
The Library has received, as usual, a good many gifts, which are 
acknowledged in the Magazine, amongst others a series of important 
original drawings of Wiltshire Churches by Owen Carter, which 
the Librarian has been able to add to the Society's collections. 
The insurance of the Museum with the County Fire Office has been 
placed upon a new basis, the buildings of the Museum and the 
caretaker's house being insured for £2,000, and the books and other 



The Report. 5 

contents of the Library, together with the cases and furniture of 
the whole Museum, for £2,500. The Committee having carefully 
considered the matter, decided that to insure the archaeological and 
natural history collections was useless, as they could in no case be 
replaced if once destroyed. 

The Bradford Bam. — The June Magazine contains an account 
by Mr. A. W. N. Burder of the work of repair now happily com- 
pleted, with the exception of the renewing of the two couples now 
propped up. It was decided that there was no immediate necessity 
for undertaking this renewal, desirable as it is ; and the matter has 
been left over till after the war. A full list of subscriptions is 
given, and the accounts, printed with the Society's other accounts, 
(in the June, 1917, Magazine) show that the whole of the repairs, 
with the above-mentioned exception, have been carried out at a 
cost, including incidentals and the legal expenses of the conveyance, 
of £424 12s. 9eZ., leaving a balance in hand of £7 lis. Qd. The 
building is now open to the inspection of visitors at a charge of 3d. 
each, the keys being kept at a cottage close to Barton Farm. For 
this extremely satisfactory result the Society's thanks are due to 
Mr. Burder, through whose energy the fund was raised and the 
work carried through, and to Mr. Brakspear for his gratuitous 
services as architect. 

Publications. — The December, 1916, number of the Magazine was 
■duly published as usual and the June number for 1917 would have 
been in members' hands before this but for the fact that it is the 
Index Number of Yol. xxxix., and that owing to the war the 
printers are unable to carry out work as expeditiously as usual, 
The Society has to thank Canon Wordsworth for a gift of £4 10s. 8d,, 
the whole cost of the illustrations of his paper on Leadenhall, a 
most helpful and acceptable gift in present circumstances. 



EAELY BRONZE AGE INTERMENT AT THE CENTRAL 
ELYING SCHOOL, UPAVON. 

Having heard through the Rev, G. H. Engleheart, F.S.A., that 
human remains and pottery had been reported to him as having 
been found in the course of excavations at the Central Flying 
School at Upavon, I went there on Dec. 2nd, 1915. Considerable 
excavations have been carried out on the slope just to the N. of 
the road from Upavon to Everley for the purpose of the erection 
of the officers' mess buildings for the Flying School near the Upavon 
end of the assemblage of buildings and hangars, Just behind the 
mess buildings, in chalk rubble, at a depth of 3ft. 6in. under the 
surface of the down, which showed no trace of any mound over it, 
a skeleton and drinking cup had been uncovered during November. 
I saw the foreman who had been in charge of the work ; he could 
give me no clear details as to how the skeleton was lying, but 
Capt. T. W. Creswell told me that the head was lying towards 
the north-east. According to the foreman nothing besides the 
drinking cup was found, and unfortunately this was broken and 
about half of it, presumably in small pieces, was lost, before it was 
realised that the find was of interest, and steps were taken to 
preserve the remains. The foreman promised that in case of any 
further finds care should be taken to preserve everything. The 
skeleton and the fragments of the cup which had been taken care of 
in the R.E. office, were handed over to me by Col. Van Straubenzee 
for the Society's Museum. 

Of the drinking cup three large fragments, and one smaller one, 
remain, forming about half of the rim, and rather more of the base. 
These give a diameter of 5 Jin, for the rim, and 2fin. for the base. 
Unfortunately some small portion of the vessel between the rim 
and base fragments is lost, but the height was probably about 6 J 
inches. It belongs to Thurnam's type of "Ovoid Cups with re- 
curved rims," Type B. I. of Abercromby, who describes its character- 
istics thus : — " In this there is no distinct demarcation between the 



Early Bronze Age Interment. 7 

body and the rim, bub the one glides into the other by a gradual 
curve. The brim is of slight elevation and in the Wilts examples 
is curved outwards at the lip. The body instead of being globular, 
is oval. More attention seems paid to the fabric than to decoration. 
The walls are thinner than in any other variety of British fictile 
vessels, and as they have been well fired, the colour is red, almost 
as bright as that of Samian ware." 1 

The Upavon cup is of the same type as that from Barrow 161 
(Hoare) at Norman ton, No. 147 Stourhead Catalogue, and that from 
the barrow on Koundway Hill which was accompanied by the large 
copper dagger (Catalogue ofAntiq. Pt. II, X. 50, Plate VIII., 4,) both 
of which are in the Society's Museum. It is therefore probable 
that the Upavon example belongs, as the others do, to an early date 
in the Bronze Age. It is of excellent hard well-burnt ware, red 
on the outside, and black in the interior substance of the ware. 
It is smoothed on the outside surface, but is not visibly polished 
as the Koundway Cup is. It has very much the appearance pre- 
sented by the ware of a modern flower pot. The whole surface, 
with the exception of 1 inch at the base which is plain, is covered 
by the ornament so often found on this type of drinking cup, viz., 
a series of roughly parallel horizontal dotted lines at very short 
intervals. These are carelessly put on, and in some cases run into 
one another. They were produced by the impress of a thin curved 
slip of wood or bone slightly notched at short intervals. 2 

The bones of the skeleton are in good condition, and have been 
examined by Dr. Keith, F.K,S., who has most kindly written the 
full notes upon them printed below. 

I was shown at the same time another lower jaw found near the 

same spot, but nothing seemed to be known about it. Probably it 

was a portion of another interment of which nothing else had been 

preserved by the workmen. 

Ed. H. Goddard. 

1 Abercromby, Bronze Age Pottery, I. 18. In Plate VI. he gives photo- 
graphs of a number of these vessels from Wilts and Dorset. 

2 The slip of bone or wood was probably convexly curved, or may have 
been formed like a disc or wheel. Abercromby, Bronze Age Pottery, I. 50, 
note. 



NOTES ON THE SKELETON FOUND IN AN EARLY 
BRONZE-AGE-BURIAL AT UPAVON, 1915. 

By Arthur Keith, M.D., F.R.S., Conservator of Museum, 
Royal College of Surgeons of England. 

The man represented by these remains (a skull and lower jaw, 
left thigh bone, left os innominatum, two fused vertebrse, left 
humerus, and radius and right ulna), was beyond any doubt a 
typical member of that brachycephalic race which appears in 
Britain for the first time at the close of the Neolithic period. The 
person represented is an aged man — with bent back, for he had 
suffered from severe rheumatoid disease of the spine ; the coronal 
suture of the skull is obliterated, the sagittal suture almost obliter- 
ated, while the lamboid is still distinctly visible and in most parts 
unclosed. Although not a single tooth had been lost at the time 
of death, in the case of one tooth, the first upper molar of the left 
side, the crown has been worn away until the whole pulp cavity 
lies exposed. At one time or another abscesses had formed at the 
roots of the following teeth : — second upper incisor of the left side, 
first upper molar of the left side, right lateral incisor and canine 
of the lower jaw. There was not a speck of that common disease 
of modern and Roman times — caries of the teeth. The limb bones 
are slender with ill-developed muscular ridges — but it is very 
probable that these characters are but further evidence of the 
man's advanced age. 

From the length of the limb bones — the vertical or standing 
height of the femur being 436mm., the humerus 31 1mm., the radius 
253mm, — we may infer that his stature, when in his prime, was 
about 5ft, 4in, 

Characters of the Skull. 

The general features of the skull may be seen from the accom- 
panying figures. Its maximum length, 179mm., its maximum 
width, 148mm., giving a cephalic index of 827. The roof is re- 
markably low, rising at its highest point only 109mm. above the 



Notes on the Skeleton found in an Early Bronze- Age-Burial. 9 

ear passages. In form and proportions, especially in the lowness 
of its roof and rather cap-shaped occipital hone, this skull recalls 
the form found in the short cists (Bronze Age) of the KE. of 
Scotland, The vertical and occipital views (Figs. 2 and 3) bring 




Fig 1. The skull in profile oriented on the fronto-malar and 
asterionic plane and enclosed in a framework of 

lines which fits the average modern British skull. 
Fig. 2. Occipital view of the skull oriented on the f. m. ast. 

plane. 
Fig. 3. Vertex view — on the same plane. 

out its outstanding feature. The skull strikes one as capacious, 
and yet when we apply the formula invented by Pearson and Lee 



10 Notes on the Skeleton found in an Early Bronze- Age-Burial '. 

for estimating the cranial capacity, it turns out to be only 1376c. c. 
— considerably below both ancient and modern averages. 

The skull feels heavy, its bones are thick, varying along the 
vault from 6 to 9 mm. The bones of the face are massive and 
strong. The supra-orbital ridges, particularly the supra-ciliary 
parts, are pronounced. The forehead appears wide because of the 
lowness of the vault ; as a matter of fact the minimal frontal width 
— measured between the temporal lines — is 95mm. — a moderate 
amount. The width measured from the outer margin of one fron to- 
malar suture to the outer border of the other, is 102mm. The 
face was of moderate length, upper face naso-alveolar length being 
67mm.; the nasi-mental or whole length, 108mm. The width 
was relatively large, the bizygomatic diameter being 125mm., the 
malar width, measured between the lower end of the malo-maxillaiy 
sutures, 92mm. The upper jaws and cheek bones are particularly 
strong; the cheek bones in life must have been prominent. The 
nose is narrow and of medium length — the nasal height being 
50mm., the width 22mm. The nasal bones are not present, but 
one infers that they were prominent. The orbits are wide, 40mm., 
as is usually the case, and of medium height (35mm.). The lower 
jaw is also robust. The chin forms a triangular eminence of 
moderate prominence. The depth or vertical measurement at the 
region of the symphysis is 29mm., its front to back maximum 
thickness, 18mm. As is so commonly the case in skulls of this 
type, the angles of the jaws are prominent and wide apart, the 
bigonial diameter being 113mm. That diameter helps to give the 
full "jowls" which mark this "beaker" race. The ascending 
ramus of the mandible has a width of 33mm. ; the sigmoid notch 
is of moderate depth. 

The Skeleton. 

Of the bones of the skeleton little need be said. The diameter 
of the head of the femur is 46mm — in both its vertical and antero- 
posterior directions. In its upper third the femur is but moderately 
flattened — the transverse diameter being 32mm., its antero-pos- 
terior, 27mm." — the index of flattening being thus 84. The area 



By Arthur Keith, M.D., F.B.S. 11 

for insertion of the gluteus maximus is marked by a rough trough- 
shaped impression, with a prominent ridge marking the inner or 
mesial margin of the impression. The . linea aspera is scarcely 
raised above the contour of the shaft; at the middle of the shaft 
the antero-posterior and transverse diameters are alike— namely, 
27mm. When I mention that the shaft of the humerus at the 
deltoid impression has the following diameters: — antero-posterior, 
21mm. ; transverse, 20mm., the slenderness of the shafts of the 
long bones — in relation to their relatively massive articular ex- 
tremities — will be realized, The lower third of the ulna shows a 
well-marked bend — the concavity of the bend facing towards the 
companion radius. Such a bend is not uncommon in the ulnae of 
prehistoric people, but its meaning I do not know. 

Kheumatoid changes in the spinal column joints of people living 
during the bronze-period in England were very common. In the 
case of this man we have only two vertebras, the 11th and 12th 
dorsal. The edges of their bodies are " lipped," and the interverte- 
bral disc, which should separate them, has been absorbed, resulting 
in a partial fusion of the bony tissue of the adjoining vertebrae, 
The laminae of the same two vertebrae are also united by bone — 
the articular processes being fused. There can be no doubt that 
this union is the result, not of an acute inflamatory process, but of 
a chronic one — such as is seen in diseases of a rheumatoid nature. 



12 

LIDBUKY CAMP. 1 

By Mks. M. E. Cunnington. 

Being an account of excavations carried out by Me. and Mrs. B. H. 
Cunnington in 1914. 

The excavations at Lidbury were made with the permission of 
the War Department, in whose occupation the land now is, and 
with the kind acquiescence of Captain G. M. Paine, K.K, C.B., 
M.V.O., at that time Commandant of the Central School of Avia- 
tion, Upavon. One of the conditions agreed to was that any relics 
found during the course of the digging should be placed in the 
Society's Museum at Devizes. Work was begun on July 13th, 1914, 
and was brought to an abrupt termination by the outbreak of War on 
Aug. 4th ; several of the men employed (the number varied from six 
to eight) were reservists, and were immediately called up, and it was 
felt also on other grounds that in view of the national emergency 
it- was impossible to continue. Fortunately all that was deemed 
really necessary had been done, and the date of the earthwork, the 
object in view, when the work was begun, has it is believed been 
obtained. 

The Site. 

Sir Kichard Colt Hoare's reference to Lidbury is as follows : — 

" Here is a small but perfect square earthen work, with an entrance to 
the south : the circuit of the ditch is 330 yards, and the depth of the vallum 
40ft. It is distinguished by the name of Lidbury. A bank and ditch, 
almost constant attendants on our British villages, conduct us from it 
into the adjacent valley, on the south-east declivities of which we once 
more recognise all the indicia of an extensive British settlement, situated 
not as they generally are, on a high commanding point of land, but in a 
retired and tranquil valley. The whole surrounding country clearly 
demonstrates, by numerous banks and enclosures, a very remote and 
extended cultivation."— {An. Wilts, South, 192.) 

He makes an evident mistake as to the height of the banks, as 

may be seen by a reference to Sections B, C, D, and E, PL III. 2 

1 The Society is indebted to Capt. and Mrs. B. H. Cunnington for the 
gift of £5 towards the cost of the illustrations of this paper. 

2 Lidbury is mentioned in Britton's " Wiltshire" almost in Hoare's own 
words, and the error about the height of the banks is repeated. 






Lidbury Camp. 13 

The earthwork is shown on the 6in. O.D. Map, Sheet XLVIL, 
N.E., but neither the entrance nor the ditches running from the 
enclosure appear. 

It is in' the parish of Enford, on Littlecott Down, and is now 
included in the area taken over by the Central Flying School. It 
is 520ft. above sea level, on clownland that slopes gently southward 
into Eainbow Bottom. 

Two " British Villages " are shown by Hoare in the immediate 
neighbourhood, one about half-a-mile distant, towards which the 
ditch leads in the upper part of Eainbow Bottom, referred to by 
Hoare in the above quotation ; the other to the south-east on 
Combe Hill, about a mile away. 1 

The bank is well preserved round the whole area of the camp, 
and the ditch clearly denned. There is no indication that there 
was ever more than the one entrance, indeed in such a comparatively 
small enclosure it would hardly be expected. Before the digging 
was begun the whole earthwork looked so neat and well-preserved 
that it was more than half expected that it would prove to be of 
comparatively modern date and post-Boman ; a conjecture that 
proved to be entirely wrong. The turf in and about the enclosure 
is very fine and thick, and shows no signs of modern cultivation. 

Two ditches issue from the earthwork, one as shown by Hoare, 
on the eastern side, and another, not shown by him, from the 
south-western corner. It seems useless to even attempt to con- 
jecture as to what purpose these curious ditches could have served, 
unless they were purely and simply boundaries. (See Key Plan.) 
They are traceable on the surface now over a great part of their 
length simply by a slightly more luxuriant growth of herbage, just 
enough to give a somewhat deeper tint of green, and aii added 
wealth of bloom in summer. 

Just within the south-eastern corner of the enclosure is an 
irregular depression, not natural, that may have been a pond, though 
no sign of puddling or of clay bottom could be detected ; it was 

1 The pottery, etc., that may be picked up on the sites of these so-called 
*.* British Villages " appears here, as indeed in most cases, to be Romano- 
British, but the settlements may of course have been founded earlier. 



14 Lidbury Camp, 

thought that it might prove to be the site of a dwelling, but there 
was nothing to confirm this theory, and only a few worn fragments 
of pottery were found. The rampart here has somewhat the ap- 
pearance of having been bent round to afford a sheltered nook, 
but it now seems more probable that whoever dug out the depression 
availed themselves of this already existing angle of the rampart. 

The Entrance. 

A reference to the Ground Plan of the entrenchment (PL II.) 
will show a peculiar feature of the construction at the entrance, 
and the existence of double ditches. 

Some little distance back on either side of the entrance a second 
or supernumerary ditch branches out, and extends as it appears on 
the Plan, to form an inner causeway or double entrance. It was 
however quite clear on the spot, and may be gathered by a little 
study of the Plan, that these supernumerary ditches could not 
possibly have co-existed with the present existing line of entrench- 
ment, for the simple reason that for a great part of their length 
they are actually under the rampart, and must always have been so 
since the day the rampart was made. As has already been said 
the outline of the rampart and ditch are particularly well preserved, 
so there is no question of the rampart sagging and spreading out 
over the supernumerary ditch in the course of its decay, but it was 
clearly built up over the filled-in ditch. In other words it appears 
quite clear, that for some reason which it seems useless to attempt 
even to conjecture, the original plan of the enclosure was slightly 
altered, the original ditch was filled in, a new ditch was dug, and 
the rampart piled up partly over the older and obliterated ditch. 
West of the entrance the two ditches run at first side by side, the 
older ditch being on the older side, until it is cut across by the later 
ditch, the older ditch then passes on the inner side under the ram- 
part to its end. It would seem that the older ditch was filled in, 
either intentionally or by decay, before the later one was dug; for, 
apart from the fact that it passes under the rampart, that the two 
ditches were not open at the same time was shown on the face of 
the cutting, where they run parallel, to, and impinging on each 



Lidbury Camp, 15 

other, the outline of the existing ditch being complete, and the 
outline of the other incomplete. PI. IV., Section P — P. That it 
was not merely a case of a widened ditch was also shown by the 
two distinct and separate bottoms as seen in Section Q — Q, PI. IV. 
It was at one time conjectured that the older ditch might have 
been a part of some much older work, unknown to, or at least 
ignored by, the makers of the existing enclosure, but this could 
not have been the case, because on both sides of the entrance the 
supernumerary ditches merge into, and become one with the existing 
ditch. The fact of the two gangways being so close behind one 
another seems also to disprove, or at least to make this conjecture 
unlikely. Practically no additional space was gained in the en- 
closure by the "alteration," so that it could not have been made 
with that object in view. The pottery found in the two ditches 
was of the same description, fragments of the characteristic " red- 
coated " ware being found both in the ditch under the rampart, as 
well as in that of the present entrenchment, so that although the 
earlier of the two ditches must have been obliterated before the 
present line of entrenchment was made there cannot be any great 
difference in date between them. 

Occupation, 

In the outer ditch on the eastern side of the entrance the outer 
side of the ditch had been cut back a few feet and the floor widened 
and levelled. A large quantity of broken pottery was found here 
and ashes, the remains of fires that had been lit on the spot, in- 
dicating apparently that this part of the ditch had been utilised 
for an occupation of some kind. 

A great part of the interior of the camp was trenched over in search 
of pits and for other evidence of occupation. In the south-western 
corner of the enclosure there was an irregular excavation marked 
" Fireplace" on Plan (PI. II.), where it was evident fires had been lit. 

In addition to the fireplace eleven pits were found which from 
their size and general character were, it is thought, probably storage 
pits. They were apparently too small to have served as dwelling 
pits, and there was no appearance of fires having been lit in them, 



16 Lidbury Camp. 

but in addition to the other objects found in them there were a 
considerable number of burnt flints, and these too were frequent 
in all the surface trenches. The pits as well as the ditches (except 
the supernumerary ditches on either side of the entrance) appeared 
to have become filled up by a natural process of silting, and pottery 
sherds, etc., were not more numerous on the bottoms than they 
were through the filling-in material. Various fragments of different 
vessels would be found in one pit, showing, it seems, that they 
found their way there by chance as the pit gradually silted up, 
some fragments of even the same pot being more weather worn 
than others. Only two pots from the pits were found complete 
enough to be even partially restored. 

As a whole the surface of the enclosure was very level and free 
from inequalities, and not the slightest sign of the pits could be 
detected on the surface ; the one or two places that looked as if 
they might be pits proved not to be so. Attempts were made to 
discover the pits without the labour of trenching by means of 
sounding by hammering the ground, and also by probing with a 
thin iron rod, but neither of these methods proved to be of any use, 
and the ground had to be trenched. 

The Pottery. 

In 1911 in some trial trenches on All Cannings Cross Farm, 
near Devizes, dug to test the evidence as to the early habitation of 
the site, a large quantity of pottery was found of unusual character 
and ornamentation. It was not like the known Bronze Age pottery, 
or that of the later pre-Eoman Iron Age, but from the occurrence 
of iron slag and fragments, and the general character of the finds, 
it was thought that the site belonged to the earlier centuries of 
the pre-Eoman Iron Age. By a fortunate coincidence in the next 
spring (1912) some exploration of the ancient inhabited site at 
Hengistbury Head, Hants, was made by the Society of Antiquaries, 
and here pottery of the All Cannings Cross type was found in 
considerable quantities, as well as later pre-Eoman and Eomano- 
British wares. The discoveries on these two sites were reciprocally 
helpful in establishing the period of this class of pottery. At All 



Lidbury Camp, 17 

Cannings Cross all the finds belonged to one and the same period, 
so that it was difficult, indeed impossible, to give them a sequence, 
whereas at Hengistbury Head the fact that this particular type of 
pottery was associated with objects of later dates, helped to place 
them in their Drue perspective. In his report on Hengistbury Head 
Mr, Bushe-Fox says of this type of pottery " It is unlike any of 
our known Bronze Age pottery, and is certainly earlier than the 
other pottery from the settlement, some of which belongs to the 
La Tene I. period, 400 — 250 B.C. This only leaves the Hallstatt 
period in which to place it." 1 Thus on independent evidence the 
period arrived at for this group of pottery on Hengistbury Head 
agrees generally with that given to the site at All Cannings Cross, 
this latter being based solely on the character of the pottery itself 
and of the other objects found with it. In a short account of the 
finds at the latter site, written before the exploration of the former, 
it was said "From the character of the pottery, and of the other 
finds, including iron ore and iron slag, there can be little doubt 
that the site was inhabited in the Early Iron Age, not improbably 
in the earlier part of the period, for some of the pottery seems to 
bear evidence of a lingering tradition of Bronze Age ornamentation. 2 
Had it not been for the discoveries on these two sites it would 
have been very difficult to "place" the pottery found at Lidbury ; 
but now happily it falls into line quite easily and presents little 
or no difficulty in its classification. The amount found was con- 
siderably less than at All Cannings Cross, although the excavations 
were more extensive, and it was generally less well preserved and 
in smaller pieces. There was also a smaller proportion of the finer 
and better made wares, and of ornamented pieces, but there can be 
no question as to its being of the same general character. Most 
of it is coarse, and appears to be hand-made, but as at All Cannings 
Cross some of the finer pieces may have been turned on a wheel of 

1 Reports of the Research Committee of the Society of Antiq of London. 
Excavations at Hengistbury Head, Hants, 1911 — 2, by J. Bushe-Fox, Esq., 
p. 33. 

2 A Late Celtic Inhabited Site at All Cannings Cross. Wilts Arch. Mag., 
xxxvii., 526. 

VOL. XL. — NO. CXXVII. C 



18 Zidbury Camp. 

some sort. 1 Although much of it is rougli and poor in quality, yeb 
some of it is remarkably well baked and hard, and individual frag- 
ments might almost be taken for medieval ware, they are so crisp 
and well burnt This was noticed also of some of the All Cannings 
Cross pottery. 

Some of the pieces have a polished surface, brown and "leathery "; 
others are black through and through, some with rougli surfaces, 
others highly polished ; the unpolished pieces, both red and black, 
are often much striated, the markings as a rule being up and down, 
not round the vessel (PL VII., 3) ; a number of pieces show the 
impress of the skin of the fingers of the potter on the inner surface 
of the pots ; the pastes are mixed with broken flint, sand, micaceous 
sand, and oolitic fossils ; some of the thicker coarser ware was 
mixed with chopped straw, steins of grass, or something similar, 
the impression being clearly left in the inner parts of the paste. 
One of these impressions of a blade of grass or straw in the thick- 
ness of the base of a coarse heavy pot is over an inch and a half 
in length. It does not seem to be uncommon to find early pottery 
mixed with vegetable matter; it occurs frequently in Bronze Age 
pottery, as at Am Hill, near Warminster (Wilts Arch. Mag., 
xxxvii., 540), and in the later well baked, wheel-turned " bead rim " 
bowls and the associated pottery, such as was found at Casterley 
Camp and at Oare (Wilts Arch. Mag,, xxxviii., 88). Vegetable 
matter was also found in pottery from the Glastonbury Lake Village 
(Vol. II., 499). 

As at All Cannings Cross many of the fragments show that they 

belonged to vessels having sharply defined shoulders, the line of 

the shoulder being occasionally accentuated by a series of "finger 

tip" or "finger nail" impressions, and sometimes there is a line of 

similar markings on, or immediately below, the rim. 

1 It is stated in the report on Hengistbury Head that all the pottery of 
this group (Class A) is hand-made, but that some of it is wonderfully well 
finished ; on the other hand in the " Notes on the Pottery from All Cannings 
Cross " some of the pottery was spoken of as wheel turned ; probably the 
term " wheel turned " does not correctly express what it was intended to 
convey, and it would therefore have been more correct to speak of a turn 
table, or some primitive contrivance of the kind to give a rotary motion to 
the vessels while they were being fashioned. 



Lidbury Camp. 19 

It may be noticed that frequently the vessels are broken along 
the line of the shoulder with a peculiar sloping edge to the break. 
In speaking of the technique employed in the making of the pottery 
at the Glastonbury Lake Village a process is described by which 
the pots were built up in successive bands or coils of clay, this 
beino- clearly shown by the vessels fracturing at the weakest point, 
namely, at the junction of the coils. Evidently the same method 
was used by the Lidbury and All Cannings Cross potters, with the 
difference that the break that results at the junction of the coils, 
or separate pieces of clay, is nearly always at the shoulder of the 
pot, and rarely if ever elsewhere {Glastonbury, II. , 500 — 1) . Pottery 
from the pits at Casterley broke in the same way, and the same 
typical fracture may be seen in cinerary urns of the Bronze Age. 

Most of the bases are flat, but a few show a slight foot ring. 
Many of the pieces have a sooty encrustation showing that the 
pots were used for cooking purposes. 

Among the most characteristic and remarkable specimens of the 
pottery found at All Cannings Cross, and among pottery of the 
period at Hengistbury, was a certain kind of " reel-coated " ware, 
generally in the shape of small bowls with rounded bases slightly 
concave in the centre (" omphalos base "), sharp angled shoulders, 
and girth grooves above the shoulder. (For more detailed account 
of this ware see Wilts Arch. Mag., xxxvii., 536). A number of 
fragments of this ware were found at Lidbury, but all so small 
that had it not been for the guide afforded by the All Cannings 
Cross bowls it would not have been possible to guess the forms of 
the vessels of which they had been part. As it is, however, all the 
pieces may well have, and probably did, form parts of bowls similar 
to those from the two former sites. See PI. VI., 1, 2. 

It seems rather a curious coincidence that this type of pottery 
should have been identified within such a short time on three 
separate sites, and that it should not have been met with, or 
recognised earlier. 

The discoveries at the Fisherton or Highfield Pits, near Salis- 
bury, which seem to belong to this period, were at first regarded 
as Neolithic, and that interesting discovery has not yet been 

c 2 ' 



20 Lidhury Camp. 

fully described or illustrated. The truth seems to be that relics 
of this early British Iron Age are not very uncommon, and are 
fairly widely spread, but that the isolated finds and fragments of 
pottery that resulted from casual discoveries were not sufficiently 
characteristic to prevent their being taken as either Romano- 
British, or — in the case of the coarser pottery — as even Bronze 
Age. It is not possible to appreciate the character of mere 
fragments of vessels when the types to which they belonged are 
not known, and it needed the light that the discoveries at 
Hengistbury and at All Cannings Gross threw on this class of 
pottery to make it possible to identify chance finds. There were, 
for instance, several pieces of the red-coated ware in the Society's 
Museum at Devizes, that had been regarded as somewhat of a 
puzzle, but it can be seen now that they are fragments of bowk 
similar to those from All Cannings Cross and Hengistbury Head. 
A few fragments of Romano-British pottery, including two or 
three small pieces of Samian ware, and one of a thin vase of 
" Castor" or "Cologne" ware with ornamentation "en barbotine," 
and a fragment of the late Gaulish ware, with stamped pattern of 
half rosettes, were found in surface trenching. A piece of green 
glazed ware of medieval or later date, was also found in a surface 
trench. Except for these surface finds all the pottery appears 
definitely to belong to the one period. It would indeed have been 
remarkable had nothing of Romano-British date turned up, for 
within about half-a-mile of Lidbury is the site of a large settlement 
where Romano-British pottery may be picked up by the basket 
full, and where coins and other objects are constantly turned out 
by moles and rabbits. Within a few hundred yards of the camp 
is the site of a barrow levelled in 1912, as it was dangerous to the 
aviators running their machines over the course; the barrow had 
been previously disturbed, and Romano-British pottery and oyster 
shells were found in the mound 1 ; indeed Romano-British pottery 
is almost sure to turn up in any digging on the downs hereabouts. 



Barrow on Upavon Down, Wilts Arch. Hag., xxxvii., 603 (1912). 



Lidbury Camp. 21 

The Date of the Enclosure. 

It has been said in speaking of the pottery that it is of the same 
general character as that found at All Cannings Cross, and of the 
earlier pottery from Hengistbury Head, and that this early Hen- 
gistbury pottery has been assigned to the Hallstatt period. It 
would, however, probably not be safe to assume that either the 
occupation at Lidbury or that of the site at All Cannings Cross is as 
early in actual years as that claimed for this type of pottery at 
Hengistbury. No Eoman remains of any kind were found at All 
Cannings Cross, but at Lidbury fragments of Romano-British 
pottery did occur, in surface trenchings, but never except super- 
ficially in the pits or ditches, so that these must have been silted 
up before the Romano-British types reached the site, but how long 
before there is nothing to show. 

There is much in common between the finds from the Glaston- 
bury Lake Village and those from Lidbury and All Cannings Cross, 
and although the Glastonbury pottery as a whole is not very like 
the Lidbury — All Cannings Cross group, yet some of it is com- 
parable with it, as is also some of the early Hengistbury pottery. 
The range of the Glastonbury Lake Village has been " at least 
provisionally" restricted to a period of 150 years, extending from 
100 B.C. to 50 A.D. {Glastonbury, 11., 35). 

At Glastonbury, as at Lidbury, a few objects of Romano-British 
origin were found in superficial deposits, and there was apparently 
nothing intermediate between the Roman occupation and the culture 
typical of the village as a whole. The finding at Lidbury deep 
down in the main ditch of a brooch of the type of La Tene III. 
(see PI. IX., 14), and of several fragments of bowls with inbent 
rims (see PI. VII., 5), is not suggestive of a very early date for 
this site. Bowls with inbent rims do not seem to have been found 
with the earliest pottery at Hengistbury Head, but they were 
fairly common at Glastonbury and are found on the Continent 
with pottery of the La Tene period. If the dates suggested for 
the sites of Hengistbury and Glastonbury are within the mark it 
does not seem probable that the occupation of Lidbury can date 
back further than about 400 B.C., and it may well range down to 
within a few years of the Roman conquest. 



22 Lidbury Camp. 

If, as it is believed, the early Iron Age pits found in Casterley 
Camp represent the same period as the All Cannings Cross site 
and Lidbury, it is not without significance that at Casterley there 
was no evidence of any intermediate phase between that of the 
pits and that of the developed bead rim bowls which were there, 
as at Oare (Wilts Arch. Mag., xxxvi., 128), associated with Belgic, 
Arretine, and Mont Beuvray wares dating to the early years of 
our era, 

As far as the evidence goes that has as yet been obtained from 
the site at All Cannings Cross there is a suggestion that though of 
the same period as the settlement at Lidbury it may be somewhat 
earlier in actual date. 

No pottery of the bead rim bowl type or of the wares found on 
other sites associated with it was found at Lidbury. 

Objects Found in the Pits. 

Pit 1. About half of a black ware bowl (PI. VII., Fig, 4); piece 
of a loom weight of chalk; part of a chalk bead; a considerable 
quantity of clay burnt to the redness of rough pottery on one side, 
but earthy on the other, perhaps the lining of an oven of some 
kind, or of a hearth. Among the fragments of pottery was one of 
" red-coated " ware. 

Pit 2. Flint flake, perhaps a knife; four whole sling bullets 
of burnt clay, and pieces of two others and two of chalk; two' 
pointed bone implements (PI. IX., Figs. 6 — 8) ; a scoop and flat 
blade-like implement, both of bone and imperfect; piece of 
ornamented bone (PI. IX., 7); splinter bone of pony ; a periwinkle 
shell (Littorina littoralis). 

Pit 3. Chalk bead (PI. IX„ 11) ; a handle (?) of antler (PI. X., 8) ; 
bone point; bone implement (PI. X., 11); three bone scoops, all 
imperfect (PI. X., 7); piece of chalk loom weight; chalk spindle 
whorl (PI. X., 1). Among the pottery the base of what was 
possibly a crucible. Generally there were very few animals' bones 
in the pits, but there were more than usual in this large pit, in- 
cluding jaw bones of two dogs, and of two ponies, the hoof of a 
pony, and bones of a bird. 

Pit 4. Piece of a sarsen quern or rubber ; piece of a chalk loom 



Lidbury Camp, 23 

weight , a few fragments of pottery, including one of " red coated " 
ware. 

Pit 5. Stud-shaped bead of yellow coloured paste (PL IX., 12); 
bone needle and pieces of two others (PL IX., 2 — 4); two sling 
bullets of chalk and pieces of one of burnt clay ; piece of a rubber 
and a hammerstone of fine grained sarsen ; fossil echinus. Frag- 
ments of pottery, including Figs. 1, PL V., and Fig. 4, PL VI. 

Pit 6. Boar's tusk, pierced (PL IX., 17) ; bone button, (PL IX.,15); 
a fragment of iron ; pieces of at least six, and probably more, loom 
weights of chalk ; these were all badly cracked in the pit, and 
several went irretrievably to pieces on being touched ; they are 
not usually found in this state, and it seems quite likely that they 
had been cracked and split by frost before they were covered over 
in the pit. 

Pit 7. Two sling bullets of chalk ; flat blade-like bone imple- 
ment (PL X., 9). Fragment of dish (PL VIII., 3) ; various pieces of 
fine puddled or rammed chalk mixed with broken flint. Mr. H. 
St. G. Gray states that a similar material was frequently found at 
Maumbury Rings ; it was used there in making up deficiencies in 
the chalk wall surrounding the arena and the sides of some of the 
post holes. 

Pit 8. Piece of a sarsen quern or rubber; two flint hammer 
stones ; roughly rounded lump of burnt clay about the size of a 
cricket ball; curiously shaped piece of chalk, like a cottage loaf 
(PL IX„ 16); sling bullet of chalk ; fragment of a human skull. A 
considerable quantity of a material that, looked like burnt hay or 
straw, with grains of wheat and barley and other seeds, namely : — 



Creeping Buttercup 


Ranunculus repcns 


Linn. 


Black Medick 


Mcdicago lupulina 


Linn. 


Goose-grass 


Galium Aparine 




Dock 


Rumex sp ? 




Small Nettle 


Urtica wrens 


Linn. 


Brome 


Bromus sp ? 




Barley 


Hordeum vulgare 


Linn. 


Wheat 


Triticum Vulgare 


Vill. 



With these were found shells of Vertigo pygmaca. 



24 Lidbury Camp. 

Pit 9. A few fragments of pottery only. 

Pit 10. A sling bullet of chalk; piece of ornamented bone (PL 
X., 12) ; piece of a pointed bone implement (PI. X., 9) ; one large 
chalk loom weight broken in two pieces, but not cracked like those 
in Pit 6 ; a rubber of sarsen ; a flat pebble ground at the edges. 

Pit 11. A few fragments of pottery only. (Not shown on Plan.) 

Fragments of pottery and burnt flints were found in all the pits ; 
in several were pebbles about the size of sling bullets, which may 
have been used as such. 

In the " Fireplace," in the south-west coiner of the enclosure, a 
bone needle was found (PI. IX., 1), and many burnt flints. 



Objects Found in the Ditch Sections. 

Metal. Very little metal was found. A small bronze brooch 
with spring pin of La Tene III. type came from the outer ditch, 
west of the' entrance, 3 — 4ft. deep (PL IX., 14), and in the same 
section and on the same level a small thin piece of waste sheet 
bronze, roughly crescent-shaped. These were the only objects of 
this metal found. 

Iron. A piece of iron, apparently part of a socket of some imple- 
ment, was found on the floor of the outer ditch west of the entrance ; 
another small piece of this metal was found deep in Pit 6 ; and a 
small fragment in Pit 1. A lump of iron slag about the size of a 
man's fist was found in the inner ditch east of the entrance (under 
the rampart). This was all the iron found except a few pieces in 
superficial cuttings. 

Stone.. Various hammerstones of flint and of sarsen; pieces 
only of rubbers or mealing stones; several pieces of fine grained 
sandstone sharpeners or grinding stones. 

Kimmeridge Shale, A piece of a bracelet of this material was 
found deep in the inner ditch east of the entrance, and two rough 
fragments in the outer ditch west of the entrance. 

Spindle whorls of chalk and of pottery, all of the flat type like 



Lidbury Camyy. 



9 ft 



that shown on PI. X., Fig. 1. Fragments only of several loom 
weights both of chalk and of burnt clay. Pieces of several bone 
scoops, and pieces of other bone implements, but all fragmentary 
and of no special interest. 

Human Remains. An arm bone (humerus) was found on the 
occupied floor of the outer ditch east of the entrauce. Three 
separate fragments of skulls were found in different parts of the 
ditch, and one fragment in Pit 7; two vertebrae came from the 
ditch on the eastern side of the entrenchment; but the most curious 
of these human relics was that of the upper part of an ulna cut 
and shaped into a scoop-like implement (PI. X., Fig. 10); this came 
from the occupied floor of the outer ditch east of the entrance. It 
was noticed also at All Cannings Cross, a site believed to be ap- 
proximately of the same date as Lidbury, that detached pieces of 
humanity were liable to turn up in a quite indiscriminate manner. 

On the widened floor of the outer ditch east of the entrance was 
found a fragment of an object of unknown use of baked clay ; it looks 
like a piece of a flat brick or thick tile, its one remaining unbroken 
edge is rounded, and there are the remains of a perforation through 
its thickness from one flat surface to the oiher; it might possibly 
have been a loom weight, but if so, it was of unusual shape. Mr. 
H, St. George Gray has kindly drawn attention to what appears 
to have been a somewhat similar object found at Glastonbury Lake 
Village, and now in the Museum there ; it is described but not 
illustrated in Glastonbury, II., p. 561, D42, as follows: — "Portion 
of a fairly large flat object having smooth surface and rounded 
edges. Maximum length, 90 mm. ; it has a perforation of oval 
form." A similar fragment with perforation was found at Casterley 
Camp, Wilts. At Wallington Camp, near Croydon, a number of 
flat tiles of much fired clay pierced with irregular holes were found 
in the ditches by N. F. Kobartes, F.G S , during excavations on the 
site; they were regarded as griddles upon which the cooking pots 
were placed over the fires; possibly the fragments from Lidbury 
and the above mentioned sites were parts of similar objects, and 
used as suggested, (" Earthwork of England" by Hadrian Allcroft, 
p. 141.) 



26 Lidbury Gamp. 

Objects Found in Surface Trenching. 

Canine tooth of dog, bored for suspension (PI. IX., Fig. 9). 

Iron socket of an implement. ? modern. 

A few iron nails. ? comparatively modern. 

Iron awl, square in section. ? Romano-British. 

Piece of iron slag. 

Half of small whetstone of fine grained sandstone, much worn. 

Some fragments of rubbers or querns of a micaceous sandstone. 

Eleven hammerstones of flint and sarsen. 

Rough spindlewhorl of chalk. 

A few oyster shells. 

Two antlers of roe-deer. 

Fragments of antler of red-deer. 

Fragments of pottery such as were found in the pits and ditches, 
including " red coated " ware. 

Fragments of Romano-British pottery, including four small 
pieces of Samian ware, a turned base of a small vase of ? Castor 
ware, piece of 5th century ware with stamped half rosette orna- 
mentation. 

Piece of green glazed ware of medieval or later date. 

Other Sites on which the " Red Coated " Pottery has 
been Found in Wilts. 

Numerous fragments of red coated ware have been found in pits 
on Wilsford Down, near Devizes, but so far no decorated pottery. 
The account of these pits has not yet been published, but see I 
Devizes Museum Catalogue Pt. II., p. 92 (where on p. 94 this ware 
is mistakenly spoken of as red painted). 

Two pieces of red coated ware were found in a pit on Oldbury 
Hill, near Calne ; they are ornamented with a rudely incised chevron 
pattern. Devizes Museum Catalogue, Part II., p. 96, 847. 

Among the finds from Cold Kitchen Hill, Wilts, are various 
fragments of red coated ware. Wilts Arch. Mag., xxvii,, 279 ; and 
Devizes Museum Cat. 

From the Fisherton Pits, near Salisbury. 



Lidbury Camp. 27 

The pits found in Casterley Camp, Wilts, and referred to the 
early Iron Age on account of the iron brooch and rude hand-made 
pottery in them, probably belong to this period. Although there 
I was none of the red coated or decorated pottery the pottery found 
is quite comparable with the ruder sort from Lidbury and All 
Cannings Cross. Apiece of ornamented pottery of a Hengistbury 
type was found in one of the ditches on the site and is -here figured 
(PL VIIL, 1.) Wilts Arch. Mag., xxxviii., 53, June, 1913. 



farish offnfbrcf 









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Plan of Lidbury Camp. 



28 Lidbury Camp. 

The Plates. 

Plate I. 
Key Plan. 

Plate II. 
Plan of Lidbury Camp, showing the position of the pits within 
the enclosure, the peculiar double ditches on either side of the 
entrance, the positions of the sections, etc. 

Plate III. 

Sections B— B, C— C, D— D, E— E. These are taken at different 
points across the entrenchment as it stands at present. It will 
be seen that it is only 7ft. from the top of the rampart to the sur- 
face of the ditch at the highest point, and not 40ft. as stated in 
error by Sir E. C. Hoare. 

Section A — A. This shows the little ditch that issues from the 
south corner of the entrenchment as excavated. 

Secton F — F. This is the small ditcli that issues from the en- 
trenchment on the eastern side as excavated. 

Section X — X. This gives the outline of the ditch F — F and 
its bank a little distance from the entrenchment (see Site Plan) 
on its way towards the " British Settlement" in the upper part of 
Rainbow Bottom. 

Section of Pits 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, showing the different shapes of the 
pits found within the entrenchment.' 

Plate 17. 

Section G — G. This section on the south-west side is taken at 
the point where the small ditch mentioned by Sir R. Colt Hoare 
issues from the entrenchment, and continued through the rampart 
into the area shows the depression marked on Plan as possibly the 
site of an old pond. The inner supernumerary ditch is here both 
deeper and larger than the ditch of the present entrenchment ; 
it will be seen that the bottom of this supernumerary ditch is 
almost directly under the centre of the rampart. 

Section L — L. This is taken across the rampart and two ditches 
as in Section G — G, but further on towards the entrance; as it- 
appears on Plan the curve of the supernumerary ditch has brought 



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Plate I. Key Plan, Lidbury Camp and its Environs. 










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Plate II. Plan of Lidbury Camp, showing the position of the Pits, Sections, etc. 



Atiffiyu; 




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Plate III. Sections of Entrenchment and Pits at Lidbury Camp. 



Blame/, Dlk/l 



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Section ov tine G-G 




Section jC~£. 



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Section f?-R 




Section OrO. 



Section Q.-Q, 



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Section Af-Af- 






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Plate IV. Sections of Ditches at Lidbury Camp. 



Lidbury Camp. 29 

it round almost clear of the rampart at this point. In the outer 
ditch a considerable accumulation of pottery fragments was found 
at this place, and the bottom of the ditch had been widened and 
slightly deepened apparently to provide more room for a "squat" 
of some kind. 

Section P—P. This shows the ditch of the present entrenchment 
and the older ditch merging into one another on the western side 
of the entrance. For a few feet the two ditches run parallel to 
and encroaching on each other; the older ditch b.eing here on the 
outer side. The fact that the outline of the older ditch is incom- 
plete, and that the outline of the ditch of the present entrenchment 
is perfect shows that the older ditch must have been filled up, either 
by natural silting or intentionally, before the later ditch was dug. 
This section therefore affords evidence of the relative age of the 
two ditches in addition to that afforded by the fact that the older 
ditch is for a great part of its course directly under the present 
rampart. 

Section O-O. This, like Section P-P, is taken across the two 
ditches, but further on towards the entrance at the point just after 
the later ditch has cut across the earlier one; the older ditch is 
now on the inner side. (It must be borne in mind that this section 
is taken with the observer's back to P—P, that is to say, looking 
towards the east, not west, as in Section P P.) 

Section Q— Q shows the bottoms of the two ditches of different 
depths between the points P — P and 0. 

Section li— R. This is the end of the ditch of the present en- 
trenchment on the west side of the entrance. 

Section M— M. Shows the end of the earlier ditch within the 
entrenchment on the eastern side. 

Section N— N. Plan and section of the end of the ditch of the 
present entrenchment on the eastern side of the entrance. 

Section K— K. This is across the ditch of the entrenchment 
just outside the site of what appears to have been an old pond. 
It shows that at this point after the silting in of the ditch had 
so far ceased as to allow turf to grow over the silt, additional 
filling in was thrown on top of the turf; from the appearance it 



30 Lidhury Camp. 

was thought not unlikely that this was due to the material dug 
out to form the (?) pond being thrown back over the rampart, 
some of it rolling over down into the partly silted-up ditch. A 
piece of "Castor" ware, a small fragment of Samian, and a small 
thin iron knife blade were found above the old turf line. 
Section H — H. This is through the rampart only, 

Plate V. 

Fig. I. — Vessel, incomplete (a cooking pot ?), hand-made of 
greyish black ware with brownish patches : surface tooled and 
slightly polished round shoulder; has patches of a sooty encrusta- 
tion. Height, 9 Jin. ; outside rim diameter, 8 Jin. ; base, about 5 Jin. 
Pound in fragments in Pit 5. 

Fig. 2. — Vessel, incomplete (a cooking pot ?) hand-made, of grey 
paste burnt to red on the outside ; the outside was much striated 
before firing, the strokes being both up and down and round the 
vessel ; there are no similar lines on the inside, but the impress of 
the skin of the fingers of the potter is in places distinct. Height, 
9 Jin., rim diameter, about 7 Jin., base, about 6 Jin. Found with 
fragments of "red coated " ware and other pottery sherds 4ft. deep 
in outer ditch east of entrance. 

Plate VI, 

Fig, 1. — Bowl-shaped vessel (restored), of polished black ware, 
the base rounded with concave dent ("omphalos"), three girth grooves 
above shoulder, deeply but rather irregularly impressed. Height, 
4in. ; rim diameter, 5Jin, 

Fig. 2. —A bowl of polished black ware of the same type as Fig, 
1, with rounded concave base and five girth grooves above shoulder ; 
in both cases the grooves were produced by impressing the clay 
before firing. Height, 3 Jin. ; rim diameter, 5in. 

Both these bowls were found on the inhabited site at All 
Cannings Cross Farm, but were not illustrated at the time of the 
publication of the notes on that find as they had not then been re- 
stored. Fragments of many similar bowls both of polished black 
and of polished " red coated " pottery were found on that site ; at 



. 





I 

2 

3 

4 ■ 

5 
Inches 




Plate V. Pottery from Lidbury Camp. 



w 



v 








I 

2 

3 

4 

5 
Inc 



hes 




Plate VI. Pottery from Lidbury Camp. 



■■■- 





- 3 



4 
Inches 



Plate VII. Pottery from Lidbury Camp. 









SM^S^Ps^ 




Plate VIII. Pottery from Lidbury Camp, etc. | 



Lidbury Camp. 31 

Lidbury fragments of " red coated " ware that had clearly formed 
parts of bowls of this type were found, but as all these pieces 
are very small it has been thought permissible to show these i e- 
stored bowls from another site to illustrate the type of vessel to 
which the fragments from Lidbury belonged. 1 

Fig. 3. — Vessel, incomplete (a cooking pot ?), hand-made, of grey 
paste burnt to a dull red both inside and out, very soft and sandy ; 
the exterior surface flakes off, a slip or coating of finer clay having 
been applied to the sandy paste over the outside of the vessel. 
This same kind of soft sandy ware with the surface flaking off was 
found in the pits at Casterley Camp. Height, 7|in. ; rim diameter, 
6in.; base, about 5 Jin. Found with Fig. 2, PI. V. 

Y\g. 4. — Fragment of black ware with surface carefully smoothed 
but not polished; it has a "scribble" pattern but is not complete 
enough to make out any definite design ; the lines were impressed 
on the soft clay by a blunt-ended tool. The vessel seems to have 
been a large open-mouthed bowl. Found in Pit 5 with Fig. I, PI. V. 

Plate VII. 

1. — Piece of shoulder of a vessel, the shoulder line emphasized 
by sharply incised "finger nail" markings. The ware is dull red 
on the outside, brown to black on the inside. Found in Pit 2. 

Several fragments from Lidbury show " finger tip " or " finger 
nail " impressions round rim or shoulder, or both, but it occurred 
much less frequently than at All Cannings Cross. Similar markings 
were commonly met with on pottery of the period at Hengistbuiy 
Head, and occur also on similar pottery on the Continent. On the 
coarser wares it is practically indistinguishable from ornament of 
the Bronze Age, and rather raises a question as to whether some 
of the cinerary urns found in barrows and interments without 
other relics may not really belong to this later date. See, for 
example, Fig. 1, Plate III., from All Cannings Cross, Wilts Arch. 
May., xxxvii., and a tall pot from the ISTecropole de Tarbes, Revue 
Arch., 1212, PI. T., 14. 



1 Bowls of this form seem to have appeared on the Continent already in 
Neolithic times. See La Poterie aux Epoques Prehistoriqv.es et Gauloise 
En Armorique by P. Du Chatellier ; pi. I., 6 Manuel D 'Archeologie . 
Dechelette, p. 557, 3. 



32 Lidbury Camp. 

2, — Eim piece of a large hand-made pot of coarse greyish brown 
ware with "finger tip" impressions on shoulder. Pit 8. 

3. — Kim piece of small hand-made pot, showing the vertical 
striations so often noticeable on pottery from this site; paste grey 
in the middle but burnt red on both inner and outer surfaces. Ditch. 

L — Bowl, imperfect, of hand-made greyish black ware ; surface 
tooled smooth but not now polished; paste mixed with broken 
flint. Height, 4Jin. ; rim diameter, 7in.; base, 3in. Found in 
several pieces in Pit 1. 

A smaller but otherwise similar bowl was found in some pits on 
Wilsford Down with other pottery, etc., of the Lidbury — All 
Cannings Cross type. 

5. — Fragment of hand-made bowl of black ware, the paste mixed 
with micaceous sand and broken flint; surface tooled smooth but 
not polished, and coated or faced with a finer washed clay that is 
inclined to flake off. Found in Pit 2. 

This type of bowl, with its slightly inbent rim, is interesting as 
it is apparently the forerunner of the later " bead rim" bowl, which 
it much resembles in general form. Only two or three of these 
bowls are represented in the fragments from Lidbury, and it was 
not found at All Cannings Cross or on the site of the settlement 
on Wilsford Down. The type is a common and widely-distributed 
one on the Continent, as well as in Britain before the Eoman era. 
It seems to have been common at the Glastonbury Lake Village 
both with and without the addition of a beading to the inbent rim. 
(Glastonbury. Types XIX. and XXIV., PI. LXXVL, PI. LXXIL, 
PI 20; PI. LXXVIL, P176.) 

The inbent rim does not seem to have been identified at Hen- 
gistbury among the earliest pottery found there. This form of 
bowl is no doubt later than the other types more characteristic of 
the sites at Lidbury and All Cannings Cross, and this perhaps is 
the reason of its apparent absence from this latter site, its rarity 
at Lidbury, its association with pottery of La Tene Type on the 
Continent, and its abundance at Glastonbury, etc. 

Plate VIII. 
1. Fragment of ornamented pottery from bottom of Ditch 8 in 



Lidbury Camp. 33 

ZJasterley Camp. It is of light-coloured yellowish clay, with 
smoothed surface, the exterior slightly polished; ornamented 
with double rows of punctures, or small circular depressions, the 
ows of circles enclosed within impressed lines. 

2.— Fragment of ornamented pottery; the paste is well baked 
und of a reddish colour; the outer surface is covered with a pale 
jrown coating or wash; ornamented with lightly-impressed lines. 
Part of a boss, or perhaps of a handle, is shown on the upper right- 
hand corner. Found 3 — 4ft. deep in main ditch of enclosure east 
of the entrance. 

jj. Kim piece of a shallow bowl or dish of fine black ware, 

laving the surface carefully tooled and polished, and two rows 
)f chevron or zigzag ornament scratched in after baking. Found 
in Pit 1. 

A smaller piece of a vessel of the same form and material with 
the same scratched ornament was found in Pit 1. 

Plate IX. 

1. — Bone needle, with long-shaped eye; length, 3Jin. Found 
in " Fireplace" in the south-west corner of the enclosure. 

2.— Bone needle, with long-shaped eye; length, 3Jin. Pit 5. 

3—4 5. — Pieces of bone needles; the eyes of Nos. 3 and 4 

,ppear to have been circular, and on No. 4 an attempt seems to 
have been made to bore a new eye below the broken one. Nos. 3 
land 5 were found in Pit 2, No. 4 in Pit 5. 

6. — Pointed bone implement; imperfect. Pit 2. 

7. Thin fragment of bone, roughly ornamented with incised 

lines. Pit 2. 

8. Pointed bone implement, the upper edge bevelled off; com- 
plete. Pit 2. 

9.— Caiiine tooth of dog, perforated. Surface trenching, 

A similarly perforated tooth was found at Casterley, also near 
the surface. Others have been found in the Glastonbury Lake 
Tillage and elsewhere ; see vol. II., p. 480. 

10— 11.— Beads (?) of chalk. Ditch and Pit 3. 

12. Stud-shaped bead of pale yellow coloured vitreous paste. 

Pit, 5, 

VOL. XL. — NO. CXXVII. D 



34 Lidbury Camp. 

No bead of this shape appears in the books available for reference, 
and Mr. H. St. George Gray writes that although beads of the 
colour occurred at Glastonbury no bead of this form was found. 

13. — Thin piece of bone perforated in one corner, the point 
broken. Ditch of enclosure west of entrance. 

This has been identified as a piece ofHhe temporal bone of a 
human skull by Mr. J. Wilfrid Jackson, F.G.S., Assistant Keeper 
of the Manchester Museum. The object is probably incomplete, 
as the edges, with the exception of the upper one which has been 
bevelled off, are rough. The hole suggests that the object may have 
been suspended and worn perhaps as anamulet,a practice apparently 
not uncommon with pieces of human skull. The pointed appear- 
ance that rather suggests that it might have been used as a borer 
or pricker of some kind may be due only to accidental fracture. 

14. — Small bronze brooch, with spring pin, all one piece of metal ; 
bow slightly flattened, plain, La Tenelll. Type. Four feet.deep in 
ditch of enclosure west of entrance. 

With the exception of a small thin roughly crescent-shaped 
fragment of bronze found in the same section and on the same 

o 

level, this was the only object of bronze found at Lidbury. 

Although brooches of this type appear to have survived well 
into Eoman tirnes, they are nevertheless distinctively Late Celtic 
in origin. Three brooches that compare with this one from Lidbury 
were found at Glastonbury Lake Village; they are classified as La 
Tene III. Fibulae, with solid catch-plates and flat bows, vol. I., p. 
194. 

15. — Piece of a rib bone cut off at both ends, with a hole through 
the middle, bored from both sides. Pit 6. Similar objects are 
generally described as buttons or dress fasteners, but appear to be 
more usually made from the shafts of carpal or tarsal bones of sheep 
and goats, etc. {Glastonbury, vol, II., p, 406.) 

16. — Piece of chalk cut roughly to the form of a miniature cottage 
loaf ; it rather suggests that it was intended to tie a cord round the 
waist or groove for some purpose. Pit 8. 

17, — Perforated boar's tusk. Pit 6. 




Plate IX. Objects from Excavations at Lidbury Camp. 




Plate X. Objects from Excavations at Lidbury Camp, f 



Lidbury Camp. 35 

Plate X. 

1. — Spindle whorl of chalk ; hole bored from both sides. Diam., 
2#u. Pit 3. 

2„— 3 Sling bullets of chalk. Pits 2 and 7. 

In all nine chalk sling bullets were found in the pits. 

4.— Sling bullet of baked clay. Pit 2. 
Six sling bullets of baked clay were found in this pit. 

5. — Fragment of iron, apparently piece of a socket of some im- 
plement. Found at the bottom of the ditch of the enclosure west 
of the entrance. 

Very little iron was found and this piece so deep in the ditch is 
of some little importance in helping to date the site. 

6.— Bone implement, perforated at top, end broken, section 
square. Four feet deep in ditch of enclosure. 

7. — Bone implement with scoop-like end, upper part broken 
away, section square. Pit 3. 

8. — Point of tine of antler of red deer; the horn has a tapering 
hole hollowed out to a depth of 1 Jin., and the edge is bevelled off; 
it may, perhaps, have served as a handle to some implement. Pit 3. 

9. — Strip of thin bone with rounded edges, one end pointed the 
other broken away. Pit 10. 

10. — Portion of a human ulna, the shaft cut to form a pointed 
scoop-like implement. 

This use of a human bone appears to be somewhat remarkable 
and unusual. Found with a considerable accumulation of pottery 
in the ditch east of the entrance. 

Mr. J. W. Jackson, F.G-.S , who kindly identified this bone, has 
drawn attention to a human femur, split and apparently used as 
a tool, found by him in a Cave at Warton Crag. Transactions of 
the Lancashire and Cheshire Antiquarian Society, vol. xxx., p. 115, 

11. — Implement of bone made from a rib of (?) ox ; one surface 
of the rib has been cut away up to half the length of the implement 
and the remaining part pointed (the extreme point is lost). Length, 
4Jin. Pit 3. 

A similar implement was found at All Cannings Cross (W,A.M., 
jxxxvii.), but no other implement similar to this appears in the 

books available for reference. 

D 2 



36 Lidbury Camp, 

12. — Piece of rib bone with incised lines in lattice-like pattern, 
Pit 10. 

13. — Fragment of a bone implement; it might well bave been 
the blade-like end of an implement similar to No. 11. Pit 2. 

14. — Fragment of pottery, apparently a piece of a rim of some 
vessel with a perforation through the overhanging edge of the 
rim ; the paste is red to yellow and rather soft and sandy. Ditch 
of enclosure. 



We are indebted to the Rev. E. H. Goddard, for most kindly 
drawing the objects shown on Plates VIII., IX., and X, 

To Mr. Percy Farrer we are most grateful for the time and 
trouble devoted by him to surveying and recording the details of 
all the sections, making the plans, etc., but in fairness to him we 
should add that he is not responsible for the actual penmanship as 
reproduced. 

Thanks are also due to Dr. Boyd Dawkins and to Mr, J, Wilfrid 
Jackson, F.G.S., for most kindly identifying some of the animal 
remains found on the site, and to Mr. H. St. George Gray for many 
helpful suggestions. 

Mrs. Clement Reid and Mr. Arthur H. Lyell, F.S.A., most kindly 
identified the wheat, barley, and other seeds found among the 
charred material in Pit 8. 

Mr. Woodward, of the Natural History Museum at South Ken- 
sington, kindly named the shells of Vertigo pygmaea found with 
the charred seeds, etc., in Pit 8. 






37 



WILTSHIRE NEWSPAPERS— PAST AND PRESENT. 

Part L 
By J. J. Slade. 
So far as can be braced the following newspapers have been or 
are being published in Wiltshire : — 

Salisbury and Winchester Journal (1738). 

Wiltshire Gazette (1816). 

Wilts and Glostershire Standard (1837). 

Swindon Advertiser (1854). 
Wiltshire Times (1854). 

Devizes and Wiltshire Advertiser (1857). 

Wilts, Berks, and Hants County Paper (1859). 

North Wilts Herald (1861). 

Salisbury Times (1868). 

North Wilts Guardian (1873). 

Wiltshire Telegraph (1877). 

Warminster and Westbury Journal (1881). 

Evening North Wilts Herald (1887). 

Evening Svjindon Advertiser (1898). 

Wiltshire News (1911). 
(The above are now being issued under the " principal " titles as 
given ; subsidiary and former titles will be stated in the separate 
notice of each paper. The newspapers which follow have either 
ceased to exist or are represented by one of the above papers.) 

Salisbiwy Postman (1715 — 16 c). 

Salisbury Journal (1729). 

Marlborough Journal (1771). 

The Detector (Salisbury) (1787 a). 

Salisbury and Wiltshire Herald (1833). 

Wiltshire Independent (Devizes) (1836). 

Wiltshire County Mirror and Express (Salisbury) (1852). 

Wiltshire Standard (Salisbury) (1833), 

Trowbridge and North Wilts Advertiser (1854), 

Warminster Herald (1857). 

Trowbridge Monthly Record (1858). 



38 Wiltshire Newspapers — Past and Present. 

Trowbridge Chronicle (1861), 
Marlborough and Hunger ford Express (1861). 
Salisbury Examiner (1862). 

Wilts County Telegram and Salisbury Advertiser (1863). 
South Wilts Express (Salisbury) (1869). 
Salisbury Standard (1869). 
Devizes Herald (1869). 
Marlborough Journal (1873). 
New Swindon Express (1876 and 1877). 
Chippenham Chronicle (1877). 
Wilton and Salisbury Chronicle (1885). 
Wilton Gazette and Three Shires Advertiser (1903). 
Calne and Chippenham Express (1907). 
West Wilts Post (Trowbridge) (1909). 
Wiltshire Herald (Warminster) (1894). 
(The publications named below were not general newspapers, 
but were devoted to special subjects.) 

The County Magazine (Salisbury) (1786). 

Western Literary Advertiser (Salisbury) (1841). 

Original Letters of Smith, Brown, Jones, and Robinson, to the 

Inhabitants of Salisbury and Wilton (1852). 
Salisbury Advertiser and South Wilts Miscellany (1854). 
Salisbury Times and Wilts Miscellany (1854), 
Warminster Miscellany and Local Advertiser (1854 — 63). 
Wilton Monthly Illustrated Journal (1877). 
New Sarum Punch (1880). 
Borough Press (Swindon). 
Magpie (Devizes), 
Wiltshire Leader. 
East Wilts Liberal Monthly. 
East Wilts Elector. 

The Nines (2nd Battalion Wiltshire Eegiment). 
The Moonraker (7th Service Battalion, Wiltshire Eegiment). 
Salisbury Diocesan Gazette (1888). 
The Jasper (published Salisbury— 1915 — paper of Universities 

and Public Schools Battalion). 






By J. J. Slade. 39 

Several of these publications were ephemeral ; two or three lasted 
a few weeks only. The records of some are scanty, and it is doubtful 
if any copies of them are in existence, even in the British Museum. 
The present article reviews some of those the history of which 
is accessible ; other articles will appear in subsequent issues of 
the Magazine, completing the record as far as it can be completed. 

It is necessary to explain why the oldest existing Wiltshire 
newspaper, The Salisbury and Winchester Journal, and its pre- 
decessor of the same name, as well as the yet earlier paper, the 
Salisbury Postman, are not dealt with in this the first article. A 
special study of the Salisbury and Wilton papers has been made for 
some years by Mrs. Herbert Kichardson, of Wilton, the author of the 
admirable article on that subject which appeared in " The Festival 
Book of Salisbury" (published 1914). That article, full though it 
is as far as it goes, is not exhaustive of the whole subject, and 
Mrs. Eichardson is continuing her researches. It is considered 
desirable that this lady shall deal with the whole of the South 
Wilts papers, and she has consented to do so, including also those 
published at Warminster. 

The method adopted by the present writer has been to secure the 
co-operation of those who are most intimately concerned with the 
newspapers described hereunder, and where they have not them- 
selves written the histories of their respective papers they have 
supplied much or all of the material and have corrected the manu- 
script or the "proofs." Those to whom the writer is specially in- 
debted in this way are Mr. W. Scotford Harmer, who wrote the 
history of the Wilts and Glo'stershire Standard ; Mr. Charles M. 
Lausdown, who contributed the section descriptive of XXxzTrowbridge 
Advertiser and Wiltshire Times; Mr. S. P. Morris, who supplied 
the material for the narrative of the Swindon Advertiser ; Mr. Frank 
A. Hayward, who was able to supply missing links in the history 
of the Trowbridge Chronicle; Mr. Joseph Southgate, who assisted 
with the record of the Wilts, Berks, and Hants County Paper ; and 
Mr. Charles Gillman, who compiled the article on the Devizes and 
Wiltshire Advertiser. For the information relating to the extinct 
Marlborough newspapers, three in number, the writer is indebted 



40 Wiltshire Neivspapers — Past and Present. 

to the Rev. J. M. Lupton, B.D., F.S.A., librarian of Marlborough 
College, Mr. K. W. Merriman, and Mr. George Cane. 

The Wiltshire Gazette, 
The Wiltshire Gazette has not always borne that title. But it 
has been always the same newspaper; it is not a successor or a 
development of a previous paper; it has never incorporated 
any other paper with itself. It has gone on in unbroken course 
in the hands of the same family for 102 years. It was started in 
Salisbury as Simpson's Salisbury Gazette in the year 1816, the first 
issue being on January 4th, The founder was George Simpson, 
who followed a not unusual course when he embodied his name in 
the title. His family belonged to Staffordshire, and it is understood 
was interested in the pottery industry. It was probably the dis- 
covery of china-clay in Cornwall which induced one of the family, 
the second son of Joseph and Ann Simpson, of Burslem, to leave 
the pottery centre and go to Truro. That second son was a George 
Simpson, and it was his son, also George, who went to Salisbury 
and established the Gazette. There has been conjecture as to why 
he selected Salisbury. The city had already an old-established 
newspaper of good repute, the Journal, and the whole of Wiltshire 
outside Salisbury was an open field for journalistic enterprise, in- 
cluding Devizes, the capital of North Wilts. Conjecture, however, 
has proved fruitless; the fact is that Salisbury was selected, and 
it must be accepted without explanation. If enquiry be made 
why young George Simpson took to journalism, the answer is easy. 
He married Mary, eldest daughter of Thomas Flindell, of Truro. 
Flindell was a printer of some note, having issued celebrated works 
from his office ; he was editor, at the age of 23, of the Doncaster 
Gazette ; he was founder of the Royal Cornivall and Falmouth Packet 
(afterwards the Royal Cornwall Gazette), also of the Western Lumi- 
nary, the latter a daily issue. The biography of Flindell, written 
by Mr. W. P. Courtney, is in the Dictionary of National Biography. 
The intimacy between the families of Simpson and Flinders, proved 
by the intermarriage, is sufficient to explain why young George 
inclined to the profession of his father-in-law. 



i 



By J. J. Slade. 41 

He started Simpsons Salisbury Gazette six months before his 
marriage, his father finding the capital. In some ways it was 
easier, in more ways it was more difficult, to start a paper early in 
the nineteenth century than it was later, The country then was 
not over-run with newspapers ; local reporting was not so volumi- 
nous, the bulk of the news being cut from the London or the other 
provincial journals. Per contra: there was an oppressive stamp 
duty which made "popular" purchase of papers impossible : the 
advertisements yielded more revenue to the Government, in the 
form of tax, than they did to the proprietor of a paper ; it was nob 
possible then to get from London the half-printed sheets which in 
the middle of the century facilitated the establishment of many 
journals; and the mechanical equipment for producing a paper 
was comparatively primitive, requiring slow and tedious hand 
working. These obstacles George Simpson had to meet, and in his 
case there was added bitter hostility, personal as well as business, 
from the old-established Journal and its influential supporters — a 
handicap which was the heavier because he was " an entire stranger 
(to Salisbury), unknown to a single individual." 

His printing and publishing office was in the Halle of John Halle, 
which then was divided and subdivided into many rooms, and its 
fine timbered roof concealed by a loft. In his first editorial pro- 
nouncement he disclaimed the intention of identifying the paper 
with a political party, almost of participation in controversy at all, 
whether on partisan lines or otherwise. This negative policy was 
abandoned later, as noted below. For three and a half years 
Simpsons Salisbury Gazette and Wilts, Hants, Dorset, and Somerset 
Advertiser (its full title) continued to be published on The Canal, 
its price 7d., its size — four pages, 18J inches long by 13 h inches — 
five columns to the page. It secured a fair number of advertise- 
ments, though not so many as did its rival — perhaps it should be 
said the paper it attempted to rival. It was more "popular" in 
style than the Journal, including in its contents poetical extracts, 
fashion articles, selections of French news, etc. The stay at 
Salisbury and the animosities which accompanied it resulted in an 
action for libel against the young journalist, which he did not 
defend, submitting to judgment for damages and costs. 



42 Wiltshire Newspapers — Past and Present. 

It was this probably, added to the other difficulties of starting 
a new paper, which led to financial difficulties. There was no 
question of compounding with creditors, but the money difficulty 
was serious at one time. Yet the paper was growing in popularity, 
its advertisement revenue was increasing : it was making influential 
friends not only in South Wilts but in newspaperless North Wilts. 
The struggle for the political representation of Wiltshire County, 
then one (undivided) constituency, led to representations to 
Mr. Simpson to remove to Devizes, and after natural hesitation 
lie took that serious step. In July, 1819, the plant and equipment 
were removed in waggons to Devizes. Here the printing and 
publishing offices were set up at No. 10, the Market Place — for a 
short time only; very soon there was a transfer to No. 23, iu the 
distinctive housewith the pillared front and the figure of iEsculapius. 
Subsequent changes of premises were all within a very small area, 
and they may be dismissed at once. After many years at No. 23, 
Mr. Simpson crossed back to the other side of the road, and printed 
and published at No. 14, his residence being at No. 1 2. Somewhere 
about 1856 the offices between No. 12 and No. 14 were built (those 
now occupied by the legal firm of Wansbrough), the works being 
at the rear of No, 14, Later, the whole of No. 14 premises were 
purchased and the office was transferred thither and the works at 
the rear were much enlarged, the whole ground space being re- 
planned and re-constructed, in 1911. It may be added that No. 
23, Market Place, was at one time the residence of Mr. John Clare, 
a medical man, the coroner who held the inquest on the body of 
Ruth Pierce. 

With the removal to Devizes the name of the paper was changed 
to The Devizes and Wiltshire Gazette. Otherwise it was unaltered, 
until in January, 1822, the length of each column was increased 
by an inch. Thirteen years later (January, 1835) a further one 
and a half inches were added to the length and the columns were 
widened, so that the size of the page became 21 inches by 15 inches. 
A more notable enlargement came on November 24th, 1836, when 
the Gazette was within a few weeks of its coming-of-age. The 
number of columns on a page increased from five to six, the columns 



By J. J. Slade. 43 

were lengthened to 21 J inches, but they were made slightly nar- 
rower, so that with the extra column the page increased in width 
by only If inches— that is, to 16f inches. The column was, however, 
•pub back to its original width on January 5th, 1843, when the 
breadth of the page became 17 J inches. In the next ten years 
there was further enlargement, the page becoming 23 inches long 
by 18 inches wide, but the most noticeable of all extensions to this 
date came in July, 1853, when the page was made to carry seven 
columns and the column was increased in length to 25 inches; the 
columns, however, were again narrowed, so that the total width 
did not exceed 19 inches. The greatest size of the paper under 
its founder was reached in the sixties, when the page was 26 inches 
long and 19J inches wide. 

Under the founder, too, the paper was not only enlarged with 
the passage of years but decreased in price. In 1855, when the 
iStamp Duty was remitted, the price was lowered from Id. to 4d. ; 
in 1863 it went down to 3d. A change of another kind, not less 
important, Mr. Simpson made in 1836, when he formally aban- 
doned his early policy of neutrality and came forth as the champion 
of the Constitutional (alias Conservative) party. The Gazette has 
nob departed from that standpoint, although it has never depended 
hipon or been controlled by the party organisation, its support to 
'the Conservative party, though consistent, being independent and 
(voluntary. 

Until close on 1870 Mr. G-eorge Simpson continued to control 
the paper which he founded. Towards the end of his life the 
control practically passed to his son, and he died on March 8th, 
1871, at the age of 79. By his energy, his perseverance, his good 
judgment, his literary power, and (emphatically not least) the ex- 
ceptional, even brilliant, business ability, of his wife, the daughter 
of the Cornish journalist, he laid the foundations sure and sound, 
and then built upon them the business now covered by the name 
of The Wiltshire Gazette. Two other of his characteristics need to 
be noted — his strong religious feeling, which gave his paper a 
ileeided "moral" tone, and his retiring disposition, which made 
Mrs. Simpson, as the intermediary between him and the world, 
in invaluable help-mate. 



44 Wiltshire Newspapers — Past and Present. 

The son of the founder, also a George Simpson, was born in the 
Halle of John Halle, while the Gazette was being published there. 
He began his work for the paper as soon as he left school — this 
school was at Norwood, between which place and Devizes lie of 
course travelled by coach, acquiring in the process a knowledge of 
coaching on the Western road at its zenith. His training for his 
life's work was thorough: there was no departmenc, literary, me- 
chanical, or commercial, of newspaper production as it was in his 
day. which he did not know, But to Wiltshire generally it was as 
the literary representative that he was known. Not only was he, 
personally, a more familiar figure in the county than any other 
journalist of his time — it is not likely that any journalist will be 
so well known, personally, in the future. With the increase of 
newspapers, and the multiplying and expansion of reports, there 
is, necessarily, concentration of effort; individual journalists cannot 
in the new circumstances acquire the pre-eminence which was 
possible in the more spacious, less crowded days of the mid-nine- 
teenth century. The second George Simpson of the Gazette knew 
all the public men of the county, he was known to them, and he 
was himself one of their number, for he not only recorded public 
policy but helped to mould it so far as Wiltshire was concerned, 
especially in the sphere of Imperial politics. He was prominent 
in local government also, being a mayor and an alderman of Devizes 
and one of the first aldermen of the County Council. In these 
public activities he was the antithesis of his father. The Gazette 
continued its progress and development under his control, which 
lasted from 1870, or thereabouts, to 1886, but it was not a period of 
many outward changes. On April 3rd, 1879, the price was reduced 
to the popular )d., and in the early eighties the broadsheet had 
grown to 27J inches by 19J inches (size of page). This Mr. 
Simpson retired from the responsibility of editorship and manage- 
ment in 1886, but he continued to contribute to the paper until 
a year or two before he died, in April, 1900. 

His successor was the present Mr. George Simpson. He is the 
last of his line of that name, his only son, Lieutenant George 
Simpson, of the Durham Light Infantry (who, however, had taken 



By. J. J. Blade. 45 

to mining engineering, and not to journalism, as his profession), 
being killed in the opening days of the Battle of the Somme. It 
was the present Mr. Simpson who on January 5th, 1888, abandoned 
the form of the four-page broadsheet for that of the handier eight 
pages of smaller size — six columns to a page, the page measuring 
22 inches long by 16f inches. The seventh column had to be put 
back in five or six years' time, the width of the page becoming 
18J inches. In 1898 the columns were lengthened to 23 inches, 
giving on the paper as a whole 56 additional inches. In May, 
1906, the ten pages were increased to twelve, with a slight short- 
ening of the columns. 

One other change under the present Mr. George Simpson was 
the alteration of the title of 1819 to The Wiltshire Gazette; this 
change was made on November 18th, 1909. It was his privilege to 
be the proprietor of the paper when it reached its centenary on 
January 6th, 1916. That was a special issue, which recorded in 
an amplified form the facts here narrated. A copy of the issue is 
on the file at the Society's Museum. 

Like nearly every, other paper, daily and weekly, the Gazette is 
in a transition state, as regards size and price, owing to the war. 
Soon after the declaration the size was reduced from twelve pages 
to ten ; in the course of 1915 there was a reduction to eight pages. 
The price was increased from Id. to l\d, in March, 1917. 

In the early part of 1914 the business was converted into the 
private company of George Simpson & Co., Devizes, Ltd., but tins 
was for convenience only, as Mr, George Simpson remains in fact 
the proprietor, though he has entrusted the actual editorship to 
the hands of one who served under him in that capacity long 
enough to be thoroughly imbued with the traditions of the paper. 



The Wiltshire Telegraph. 

The Wiltshire Telegraph was first published on January 13th, 
1877, from the offices of The Wiltshire Gazette (at that time the 
Devizes and Wiltshire Gazette), at Devizes. It. was the venture of 
the present Mr. George Simpson, although his father was then and 



46 Wiltshire Newspapers — Past and Present. 

for some years afterwards the head of the business as a whole; 
the imprint stated that it was printed and published by " George 
Simpson, Junior." The paper has always had its distinctive 
features. For instance, it was a half-penny sheet, and a half-penny 
newspaper published in a country town in 1877 was a novelty. T he- 
Gazette was then (and for more than two years onward) being 
published at 3d., and the leading article with which the Telegraph 
made its bow to the public began thus : — 

" At the pressing instance of many friends we have resolved to supply 
a want which has long been felt in Devizes as well as in other parts of 
the county by issuing weekly in addition to the Gazette a cheap Con- 
servative paper, and we have determined to do so at a price which shall 
bring it within the reach of all— even the poorest. The Wiltshire 
Telegraph will henceforth be published every Saturday morning at the 
low price of a half-penny^ and for that small sum we promise the 
working classes, for whom the Telegraph is principally intended, the 
news of the day up to the latest hour of publication in as readable and 
interesting a form as we can put it before them." 

The Telegraph has always been a four-page paper, except on one 
or two special occasions, such as the Diamond Jubilee, when it has 
been enlarged to eight pages, and one week early in the war, when, 
the paper difficulty being very menacing, it was reduced to two 
pages, It started with five columns to a page, the columns 20 
inches in length and (as they have been throughout) the width of 
those in the Gazette. After eleven years, on January 7th, 1888, 
the number of columns on a page was increased to six, this being 
editorially attributed to the success which had attended the pub- 
lication. On June 5th in the following year (1889) an inch was 
added to the length of the column, and for the first time the size of 
the Telegraph page and that of the Gazette page coincided. So it 
continued (and the record of the changes of the Gazette page from 
that date onward may be taken as applying to the Telegraph also) 
until the issue for July 8th, 1916. The paper shortage then made 
it necessary to reduce the page from seven columns (it remained 
seven for the Gazette) to six columns, and to shorten the columns 
by 2 inches, which left them 20 inches. A more drastic change 
was forced upon the management on April 7th, 1917, when the 
page was cut down to five columns of 17 inches. So it is at the 






By J. J. Slade. 47 

time of writing; it is by contrast with the Telegraph at its biggest 
almost a toy newspaper, one of the curiosities of the war. 

Another distinctive feature of the Telegraph in normal times is 
its colour. It was one of the earliest newspapers to print upon 
tinted paper, and this soon gave rise, from its hue, to the good- 
natured soubriquet of "The Pink Paper," and other terms more 
broadly humorous. It was first issued on pink paper on June 
28th, 1884, but the dye difficulty caused by the war necessitated a 
reversion to white, which took place at the reduction in size 
on July 8th, 1916. The price of the Telegraph has not been ad- 
; vanced from its original half-penny. 

It is an undesigned coincidence that the present size of the Tele- 
graph is exactly that of the earliest issues of its "parent" paper, 
the Gazette. 

The Devizes and Wiltshire Advertiser. 

The original title of this paper was The Devizes Advertiser, and 
the first number bears the date Thursday, March 25th, 1858. Its 
originator was Charles Gillman, a young man who had come from 
Cheltenham in 1852 as reporter for the Wiltshire Independent, then 
published and edited by Mr. Burrows. He was a distant relative 
of the Dr. Gilman, of Highgate, who provided a home for some years 
for the poet Cowper. Charles Gillman's first piece of work at 
Devizes was to report the funeral of Thomas Moore at Bromham, 
and his review of Moore's life and of his poetry stamped him at 
,once as having much more than average ability. He wrote a style 
of shorthand almost entirely of his own invention, and was a re- 
markably quick and correct writer. At the Independent office at 
'the same time was Mr. Henry Humphries, and the two being of 
similar tastes and temperaments, a close and life-long friendship 
sprang up between them. Mr. Humphries emigrated to the United 
States in 1856 and ten years later founded the Mexico Independent 
-newspaper, which was conducted by him till September, 1917. 

After remaining in Mr. Burrows' employ for six yearsMr. Gillman 
purchased a printing and bookselling business from Mr. Davis, at 



48 Wiltshire Newspapers — Past and Present. 

No. 28, Brittox, and here it was that he conceived and matured the 
idea of publishing a newspaper at the popular price of one penny. 
A paper at that price had been recently started at Swindon, 
and if Swindon why not Devizes ? The Devizes and Wiltshire 
Gazette and the Wiltshire Independent were both higher priced. 
He felt convinced that a penny newspaper would supply a public 
want; he also felt confident of his ability to conduct a newspaper 
successfully. Events proved that he was right in both respects. 

The following extracts are from the editor's introduction in the 
first number of the paper: — 






" Formerly newspapers had their origin chiefly in times of political 
commotion, and were designed to represent the views and opinions of 
some political party in the State. Now they are desired not as political 
organs merely, or principally, but as news-papers — which is, indeed, 
their proper character and mission. The Parliamentary legislation of 
the past few years, too, has been of such a nature as to loosen the fetters 
which bound the Press of this country, and to throw open a wide field, 
in which those possessing the facilities and the spirit to enter it, might 
find an useful, an honourable, and moreover a profitable field of exertion. 

"Under these favourable circumstances, what was to prevent the 
starting of a Cheap Newspaper in Devizes ? Such a paper is now 
placed before the public. It is for them to judge whether it deserves 
a continuance of that support which they have been pleased to award 
it so generously, and, hitherto upon trust. . . . The upward and 
onward path of increasing usefulness and efficiency is before us, and 
we are as confident that we shall always desire to tread in that path 
as we are, that in doing so we shall be sustained and encouraged by a 
generous and discerning public. 

"Instead of offering high-sounding professions and promises, a more 
practical course is ours. Let the ' talkers of society ' talk ; let the 
querulous quarrel ; let the politicians and theologians dispute ; we go 
upon a different plan — that of setting to work to supply the public with 
a really good and useful publication^ at the lowest possible price. In 
carrying out this work the only ' principles ' that will be acknowledged 
will be those of truth and justice, while all subjects will be looked at 
in the light of utility and common sense." 

The paper was of a demy size, four pages of six columns each ; 
three pages were printed in London (W. Eglington), and the first 
page contained about half advertisements and half local news. 
The method of production was on a demy " Columbian " hand-press. 
The paper met with such a large measure of approval that within 
five weeks the circulation exceeded two thousand copies, and it was 



By J. J. Slade. 49 

' found to be imperative to supply a quicker and less cumbersome 

means of printing than could by provided by a hand-press; and a 

double-demy " Caxton " machine, by Myers, of Southampton, was 

1 installed. From this time two pages were printed locally. The 

' larger machine necessitated more ground space, and a removal was 

made to newly-erected and much more commodious premises at 

I No. 19, Brittox. At first the new machine was turned by hand- 

I power by two relays of two men each, each relay working straight 

I away for fifteen minutes. But the physical energy demanded to 

I work off 2500 sheets on a heavy machine was too great, and within 

a month a 2-horse-power steam engine was installed, The financial 

I strain caused by this purchase of new machinery and removal to 

! new premises was considerable upon the somewhat slender resources 

of the proprietor, but the Advertiser had made many friends who 

were willing to lend help, amongst whom w;is Mr. Simon Watson - 

1 Taylor, Liberal M.P. for Devizes, who lent temporary help of a 

i very substantial nature. 

On September 19th, 1861, the size was increased to extra royal 

(20 inches by 27 inches) — four pages of seven columns each, the 

partly-printed sheet being still used, and an extra supplement was 

I issued occasionally when pressure upon space was severe. The 

j circulation continued to increase, and by 1876 four thousand copies 

| were printed every week. The frequent issue of supplements proved 

to be inconvenient, and the proprietor felt that the time for further 

enlargement had arrived. Accordingly a quad-demy Harrild's 

Bremner machine was purchased, and with the first issue in 

! January, 1877, an eight-page demy paper was produced, four pages 

local and four printed away. The steam engine was also displaced 

by a 2J-h.p. Crossley's " Otto " gas engine — one of the earliest in 

| the neighbourhood. At the same time the title was altered to 

} Devizes and Wilts Advertiser, the " and Wilts " having significance. 

During the years that succeeded, the " Advertiser " threw off its 

cloak of political neutrality, and became the recognised organ of 

! Liberalism and Nonconformity. Amongst its literary contributors 

j for a number of years were the brothers James and Edward Waylen, 

I and several of the masters at Marlborough College who were 

VOL. XL.— NO. CXXVII. E 



50 Wiltshire Newspapers — Past and Present. 

pronounced Liberals. At the end of 1883 the partly-printed sheet 
system was abolished ; in the beginning of 1884 and onward the 
whole eight pages were printed on the premises. In 1880 the 
lease was purchased of large workshops at the rear of Nos. 29 and 
30, Maryport Street, and as these were also adjacent to the Brittox 
premises, the two streets forming an angle here, communication 
was easily opened. The workshops became the printing office, but 
the editorial and publishing offices continued at the Brittox until 
the front houses in Maryport Street were vacated by their then 
tenants. There was then a complete transfer to that street, the 
new imprint appearing on May 1st, 1902. The stationery, etc., 
business in the Brittox has passed to other hands. 

The founder, Mr. Charles Gillman, retired from business in 
January, 1894, and the paper was carried on by his second son, 
Russell Davis Gillman. The elder son, named Charles after his 
father, had for some time been associated with the business, and 
still is so. The retiring proprietor, who died on November 28th, 
1898, was a man of many activities and interests, who gave of his 
time and his talents freely for the benefit of the religious, social, 
political, and municipal life of the town. He was elected to the 
Town Council in 1874, and served the office of Mayor for the two 
years 1889-90 and 1890-91. He was also a borough magistrate, and 
for ten years a member of the board of guardians. 

Mr. Russell Gillman, the new proprietor, had for some years 
been assisting his father in the publication of the paper. He was 
a man of considerable natural ability, who had read much and 
travelled widely, his taste for travel being created by some sea- 
faring experiences before he definitely took to journalism as his 
life's work. In recognition of his extensive travels and geographical 
knowledge he was in 1897 elected a Fellow of the Royal Geo- 
graphical Society. His knowledge of men and of the world served 
him well in his conduct of the paper, into which he infused much 
energy. On January 2nd, 1896, he increased the size of the 
Advertiser to extra quad-royal, for which purpose a new machine 
was put in — a Payne's Wharf edale of the newest pattern. This 
made it a seven columns to a page paper, and at the same time a 



By J. J. Shade. 51 

further slight; change was made in the title — from Devizes and 
Wilts Advertiser to Devizes and Wiltshire Advertiser ; it seems a 
trivial alteration but its significance lay in the prominence 
which, in the arrangement and size of type, was given to the 
name of the county, that of the town becoming subordinate. In 

1908 the jubilee of the paper was celebrated by a " Dickens 
Dinner" at the Bear Hotel, to which the leading men of the 
town and neighbourhood were invited by the proprietor, In 

1909 Mr. Gillman undertook the management of a syndicate of 
newspapers at St. Albans : in addition he was doing literary work 
for Messrs, Dent & Co., for whom he edited a " Life and Letters of 
Charles Lamb," and undertook a translation of Erckmann-Chatrian's 
" Conscript." But his most ambitious work was a translation of 
Heine's " Keisebilder," which was published by Messrs. Sampson, 
Low, Marston, & Co. The strain was greater than his strength 
would allow, and he was obliged to take a long rest, during which 
he made many sea voyages in search of health, the last being to 
the Argentine. He, like his father, was an alderman of the borough, 
served the office of mayor 1898-9, and was appointed a borough 
magistrate in 1900. He was a keen politician and an effective 
speaker on the Liberal platform. 

After the death of Mr. Kussell Gillman, in February, 1910, the 
Advertiser was carried on by his widow under the capable editorship 
of her nephew, Mr. W. H. Gillman, who had served his novitiate 
on his family's paper and now returned to it with the useful 
experience acquired with a large newspaper concern at Mansfield. 
On the outbreak of the war with Germany in August, 1914, Mr. 
Gillman enlisted in the 2/4th Wilts Regt., and after spending 
nearly a year in India returned to England to take up a com- 
mission. The vacancy in the editorship was filled by Mrs. R. Rogers, 
a niece of Mr. Russell Gillman, who was not without literary 
experience and knowledge of the world, as she had previously filled 
a position in the office of a London publisher, and had spent some 
years in the Argentine. She still presides over the destinies of the 
paper — the only lady in the county to hold the position of news- 
paper editor. 

E 2 



52 Wiltshire Newspapers — Past and Present. 

In 1915 the shortage of paper owing to the war with Germany 
necessitated a reduction in size, and the old size of quad-demy was 
reverted to. Labour difficulties, owing to nearly all the employees 
joining the army, were met by the installation of a linotype com- 
posing machine, In 1917 the difficulties of publication became 
more acute, and the majority of papers in the county raised their 
price to three half-pence. The Advertiser preferred to reduce the 
size rather than increase the price, and the contents were compressed 
into six pages. So it is at the time of writing, there being six 
columns to a page, with length of column 19 inches. 

At the end of the same year that the Devizes Advertiser was 
founded the founder issued also his "Devizes Register!' This requires 
to be recorded because in a year or two the publication (an annual 
one) included a register of the principal local and county events of 
the preceding year; this has been continued till the present date, 
and the series of nearly sixty issues is very useful for reference. 
The publication has had somewhat varying titles, but the "Begister" 
has featured throughout — Gillman's Devizes Public Register and 
Family Almanack; Gillman's Devizes Public Register, Business 
Directory, and Family Almanack ; Gillman's Devizes Public 
Register and Business Directory ; Gillman's Public Register j 
Almanack and Directory — the present title. The publication did 
not at first contain a complete directory, but it was soon added. 
It has also been the vehicle for a record of outstanding events in 
Devizes history from Norman times, and for memoranda of value 
on the history of Devizes streets with their inhabitants, and other 
articles of antiquarian interest. 

The Wiltshire Times. 

To deal adequately with The Wiltshire Times it is necessary first 
to describe the beginnings of the paper which ultimately absorbed it. 

On May 6th, 1854, The Trowbridge and North Wilts Advertiser 
was founded by the late Benjamin Lansdown. As its name de- 
notes, it was a Trowbridge production. It was published first as 
a monthly paper, the printing office being at Back Street, Trow- 
bridge, a private house almost opposite Man vers Street, which is now 



By J. J. Slade. 53 

occupied by a dealer in old clothes. The wording under the title of 
The Trowbridge and North Wilts Advertiser in its early days stated 
that it was " widely circulated in Trowbridge, Bradford, Bath, West- 
bury, Warminster, Frome, Melksham, Chippenham, Devizes, etc., 
etc.," a fairly comprehensive area for a monthly paper of four 
pages, 11 inches x 8J inches. 

A year later, in the spring of 1855, it was called The Trowbridge 
Advertiser and General Business Paper "supported by the Clergy, 
Influential Gentlemen, Manufacturers, and Tradesmen of Trow- 
bridge." The offices were said to be adjoining the Post Office, 
Trowbridge, which was then in Back Street. 

On Saturday, June 30th, 1855, it became a weekly paper under 
the title The Trowbridge Advertiser, the sub-title stating that it 
was " a weekly newspaper for the Million circulated in Trowbridge, 
Bradford, Bath, Westbury, Warminster, Frome, Melksham, etc." 
The new size was eight pages, 17 inches x 11 inches. The ad- 
vertisement rate was twopence per line, " subject to a considerable 
reduction for repeated insertions." There was not much displayed 
advertising in those days, and space was measured by the line, not 
by the inch. In the first issue of the weekly paper the following 
I Address to the Public " appeared : — 

" A penny paper embodying a mass of information, general and local, 
and published weekly, is a novelty even in these days. In presenting 
the first issue of the weekly publication of this paper to the inhabitants 
of Trowbridge, a promise of a year's duration is fulfilled. Most of the 
numerous supporters of the Trowbridge Advertiser will remember the 
occasion and great need this town and neighbourhood had for an ad- 
vertising medium at the first starting of the Advertiser, now twelve 
months since, and it must be acknowledged that their continued pat- 
ronage, together with an extensive circulation, enables the paper to be 
doubled in size as well as in the extent and nature of information, 
without increasing the price. Our weekly paper will be conducted upon 
an extended scale of improvement, in which every requisite of a regular 
journal will be contained, parliamentary news, foreign intelligence, the 
markets, subjects of general interest, together with a regular notice of 
all local matters of public interest in this town and neighbourhood . 
The price and circulation are matters deserving the notice of Advertisers, 
for the former is a curiosity in literature ; as nothing equal to the 
present publication has ever been offered at so low a price since the 
time of Caxton to the present moment. The circulation is extensive, 
equal to many of the county papers ; and readers may judge what the 



54 Wiltshire Newspapers — Past and Present. 

future will be in comparing the present to one of the former numbers 
of the Advertiser. The latest intelligence of the war will be especially 
given weekly, and further improvements still in contemplation will yet 
be announced, as regards a faithful chronicle of all matters which can 
at all interest any branch of the community." 

The Trowbridge Advertiser was the first penny weekly newspaper 
in Wiltshire, and at that time there were only about thirty or forty 
such penny weeklies in the whole of the United Kingdom, In 
the following issue it was announced that the edition was out of 
print on the second day of publication. 

The printer who launched the Trowbridge Advertiser upon the 
troubled sea of newspaperdom was a Trowbridge man who had 
returned from working in London without health but with large 
ambitions. He was 35 years old, frail and delicate, but energetic 
and keen-minded enough to see an opening in the town and 
district for a newspaper locally published. His wife, in addition 
to being the mother of three sons and a daughter, was a good 
comrade in joy and sorrow. Between them they got out the 
first little paper. He pulled off the copies on a hand press; 
she used the roller on the ink table and transferred the ink 
to the type. Another good friend in the early days was 
the Eev. Samuel Martin, a well-known preacher who was the 
minister of the Conigre Unitarian Chapel in Trowbridge; he 
used to read the proofs and cheer up Benjamin Lansdown when his 
task seemed heavy. Yet another friend was William Millington, 
an architectural draughtsman, who also painted pictures of high 
quality (many are still prized possessions in Trowbridge homes). 
William Millington was a neighbour of " Ben " Lansdown ; a 
daughter, Sarah, married the eldest son of the founder of the 
Trowbridge Advertiser, and a son, Henry, was for forty-three 
years organist of the Trowbridge Parish Church, " Ben " Lansdown 
had another great friend in Isaac Pitman, who was born in humble 
circumstances in Trowbridge, invented Phonography, and died Sir 
Isaac Pitman at the Eoyal Crescent in Bath. Benjamin Lansdown 
died on Dec. 10th, 1884, having seen the full fruition of his ambition 
in regard to the Trowbridge Advertiser. 

In the issue of the Trowbridge Advertiser of Dec. 13th, 1855 it 



By J. J. Blade. .'. 55 

was announced that the paper was to be enlarged on the last 
Saturday in the month. Instead of eight small pages it would 
consist of four large pages, " similar to the usual county and local 
newspapers. With the first issue of the large paper will be given 
to all regular subscribers a Splendid Engraving." The new paper 
was 23 inches x 18 inches in size of page, having five columns to 
the page. After that the size varied ; sometimes there were four 
pages, sometimes two, sometimes a small supplement, 

The Trowbridge Advertiser progressed in popularity during the 
following years, and in 1860 it received a big lift as regards cir- 
culation owing to the public excitement and interest aroused by 
the Eoad Hill murder, a baffling crime which was solved by the 
confession of Constance Kent. 

On April 27th, 1861, the paper was enlarged to eight pages, 
21 inches X 14 inches, forty columns. On August 29th, 1863, it 
reverted to four pages, 24 inches x 19 inches. In this form it 
was described as "a newspaper printed entirely in our own estab- 
lishment, and the first ever so produced in Trowbridge," Up to 
that time some portion of the paper, that containing general news, 
had been printed and supplied elsewhere, the half-printed sheets 
being completed by the addition of local news and advertising. 
The system is still in force in some places. 

In the autumn of 1868 it was announced that the circulation was 
2,500 copies ; in January, 1870, it had reached 3,000. In February, 
1877, the paper was again enlarged to eight pages, 24 inches x 
17 inches, there being six columns on a page, and about this time 
the circulation had reached a total of over 10,000. By this time 
the printing office had been moved to Silver Street, where a 
stationery shop occupied the front of the building. This is still in 
the occupation of the firm, although the printing works are now 
in Duke Street, where they cover a considerable area. 

Now to come to the Wiltshire Times, This was first issued on 
Sept. 28th, 1876. Its mission was political. Liberal principles 
were badly supported in the county so far as the newspapers were 
concerned, so a number of leading gentlemen in the county, holding 
Liberal views, and being anxious to propagate them, formed a 



56 Wiltshire Newspapers — Past and Present. 

company and founded a newspaper and called it The Wiltshire 
Times. It was " printed and published for the proprietors, the 
'Wiltshire Times' Co., Ltd., by Henry Barrass, at 39, Market 
Place, Devizes ; also published by William T. Helmsley, at the 
Branch Office, 47, Begent St., New Swindon," Lord Fitzmaurice 
informs us that the principal shareholders in the company were 
the Marquis of Lansdowne, the present Lord Fitzmaurice, Sir 
Thomas Grove, the Bight Hon, E. P. Bouverie (then Chairman of 
the North Wilts Liberal Association), and Mr. Gr. P. Fuller. The 
paper, which in a way was the successor of the old Liberal organ 
published at Devizes, in the same premises, and under the same 
editorship, the Wiltshire Independent, started with a big programme 
and high ideals. It was announced that " Its supporters will in- 
clude every class of the community. It will at once circulate 
among the nobility, clergy, and gentry, the professional and trading 
classes, farmers, and agricultural labourers, mechanics, and artisans." 
It was a good-looking production, but one of the hardest facts of 
the newspaper world is that very little success as a rule attends a 
newspaper which is started for the sake of certain propaganda, 
especially when the new paper has to compete with old-established 
and efficient productions already in the field it hopes to cover. A 
certain paper becomes a habit with its readers, and the habit is 
not easily broken. 

Early in 1878 the imprint stated the proprietor to be Mr. Barrass, 
and in the issue of April 22nd, 1880, under the heading " To our 
Beaders," the following appeared : — 

" It is well known to personal acquaintances, and to numerous friends 
known only by name, that the Editor and Proprietor of the Wiltshire 
Times has for the last eighteen months been suffering from ill-health, 
and therefore has not been able to exert that energy in the promotion 
of the Liberal cause in the county which his political friends and sup- 
porters have a right to expect. It has also become clear that Trowbridge 
is a more central situation than Devizes, and that the principal organ of 
Liberal opinion in the county should be located in that town. The 
Wiltshire Times will, therefore, be incorporated with our well-known 
and esteemed contemporary, the Trowbridge Advertiser , which is 
already so well known in Liberal circles for its services to our cause, 
and for the ability with which it defends its views. We would ask all 
those who have hitherto supported us in this district to give to the 



By J. J. Slade. 57 

Wiltshire Times and Trowbridge Advertiser the same assistance 
as they have to the Wiltshire Times." 

So it came to pass that the Trowbridge Advertiser became the 
Wiltshire Times and Trowbridge Advertiser, and from the printing 
works in Duke Street, Trowbridge, the two-in-one paper was first 
issued on May 1st, 1880, by its proprietor, Benjamin Lansdown, 
who the previous week had reproduced the valedictory address of 
the Wiltshire Times, and added the following : — 

"The field which specially belonged to the Wiltshire Times will, 
however, in no manner be abandoned ; on the contrary it will be worked 
with renewed and increased vigour, and the assurances of support 
already received fully warrant the belief that the same success which 
has attended the Trowbridge and North Wilts Advertiser in its older 
district will also attend it under its new and extended title in the 
broader area to which it will now appeal." 

The policy of the Wiltshire Times from that date was to give 
plenty of accurate and interesting news. It was realised more 
than ever that a county newspaper will only succeed provided 
it IS a newspaper, and not a sheet permeated with political propa- 
ganda. This policy has succeeded so well that although the paper 
has fought for Liberal principles with its coat off on many occasions, 
it numbers among its staunchest supporters and best friends those 
who follow the flag of Conservatism and Constitutionalism. The 
policy of the paper has aimed at full, accurate, and complete reports 
of county and local events and incidents; and it has succeeded 
because of that and not because of any political tenets it may have 
advocated. 

To conclude: Benjamin Lansdown took into partnership his two 
sons, James and George, who carried on the business of B. Lansdown 
& Sons after the death of the founder in 1884. James Lansdown 
died in 1901, and the sole management devolved upon the remaining 
son, George. For the last few years, owing to the ill-health 
of this gentleman, much of the burden of management has 
fallen upon the shoulders of his nephew, Charles Millington 
Lansdown, grandson of Benjamin, and sou of James. The 
present proprietors of the Wiltshire Times are George Lansdown 
and Sarah, widow of James Lansdown, and the paper is maintained 



58 Wiltshire Newspapers — Past and Present. 

In complete independence of any outside control or influence, 
political or otherwise. 

In 1903, in order to cope with the increasing sales, a rotary 
printing machine was installed and the paper was enlarged from 
eight to twelve pages. The price was one penny from the first 
issue onward, until the spring of this year (1917), when, owing to 
the greatly increased cost of production, the result of the war, it 
was raised to l\d. 

Three members of the staff have been with the firm respectively 

53, 50, and 39 years. 

- ' i 

The Trowbridge Chronicle. 

The Trowbridge Chronicle was founded in May, 1861, The office 
file of the paper lacks the first three issues, and we cannot 
quote from the editorial announcement, if there was one, with which 
the venture was inaugurated. An article which was published 
nearly thirty years afterwards, on the retirement of the founder, 
might be presumed to echo the earliest editorial proclamation, but 
for the fact that it represents a state of things which did not exist. 
It sets before the readers of 1890 a picture of a Trowbridge of 1861 
which had no newspaper, whereas the Trowbridge and North Wilts 
Advertiser, printed and published at Trowbridge, was established 
in 1854. The article of 1890 said :— 

" It [the Chronicle] was necessarilybut a crude specimen of journalism, 
yet it served the purposes for which it was intended, viz., to give its 
readers some kind of record of what was going on around them and in 
their midst, which occurrences were, till then, lost in oblivion, save and 
except fugitive bits of local news, in fragmentary form, that now and 
then found their way into the columns of a distant paper, supplied by 
stray correspondents. Whatever opinions the inhabitants of Trowbridge 
had on any subject of public import, could only be expressed to one 
another privately, as they were without the means of giving other forms 
of expression to them, except now and then by pamphlet, or in a letter 
to a Devizes, Salisbury, or Bath paper, which was very rare indeed, as 
those papers could not be expected to have sympathy with people of 
an isolated country town. With a strong under-current of democratic 
discontent against established religious and political institutions surging 
through men's minds,and no public halls in which to air their grievances, 
fancied or real, was it any wonder that the town was considered slightly 
dull and dangerous in those days and rather behind the age 1 Mr. 



By J. J. Slade. 59 

William Collins, a native of Trowbridge, and educated at the British 
School, a youth with many others who have risen to occupy prominent 
positions in the world, to his credit be it said, with full knowledge and 
cognisance of the existing state of things to which we have referred, 
started this paper, and boldly announced that the principles it would 
advocate would be those of firm and unflinching support to Church and 
State, and therefore of adherence to the cause of Conservatism." 

The paper was first issued on May 11th, 1861. Its title was 
The Trowbridge Chronicle, Volunteers Gazette, and West of England 
Advertiser ; inset in the title was a block of the royal arms. The 
imprint stated that it was " Printed and published by William 
Collins, Market Place, Trowbridge, his residence being at the same 
place." The paper was of eight pages, five columns to a page ; the 
length of the columns was 18J inches, the width 2| inches. It 
was evidently the policy of the editor to cater for and attract the 
support of the Volunteers (the Volunteer Force was something of 
a novelty), for not only was " Volunteers Gazette" a secondary 
title, but prominence was given to the Volunteer intelligence; it 
was made " a feature " (to use a modern newspaper phrase) im- 
mediately following the leading article. The tone of the editorial 
matter was pronouncedly moderate ; reading it, it does not strike 
one as bearing out the claim to the pronounced Conservative bias 
which was put forward by the writer whom we have quoted, though 
that was its tendency. In later years, after a considerable interval 
in which editorial leading articles were missing altogether, the 
political tone became sharper, and towards the close of Mr. Collins's 
regime the local asperities issued in a libel action, in which be 
came out the winner. 

Of the eight pages four were printed in London and consisted of 
news and articles which were general, not local. In this respect 
the paper was one of many of its kind. The local columns included 
news of other towns in West Wilts besides Trowbridge. Two 
advertisements showed that Mr. William Collins was a bookseller, 
bookbinder, and picture f ramer as well as a newspaper publisher and 
general printer; the advertisement of his framing business makes 
special reference to his "bird's-eye maple," which was so popular 
in early and mid-Victorian halls and dining rooms and possesses 
merits in the eyes of some people even in these days. 



60 Wiltshire Newspapers — Past and Present. 

At the beginning of 1862 the "imprint" was transferred from 
its place at the bottom of the last column on the back page, and 
placed in bold type across the front page beneath the title — "Printed 
and published by William Collins, Market Place, Trowbridge." 
The fact is mentioned because it is unusual for the name of the 
publisher to be given this form of prominence ; incorporation of 
the founder's name in the title itself was commoner, — such as 
Berrow's Worcester Journal, Simpsons Salisbury Gazette, Keenes 
Bath Journal, and the like. On the 3rd May the same year the 
ordinary imprint re-appeared, but the displayed announcement on 
the front page remained until the size of the paper was altered in 
1876, as noted below. 

Minor changes in appearance, but significant of meaning to those 
who have inner knowledge of the working of newspapers, took 
place as time passed. The Volunteer intelligence dwindled until 
it no longer justified the "feature" heading and the prominence 
first given to it; on the 23rd November, 1861, and onwards this 
class of news was dealt with like the rest, but " Volunteers' Gazette " 
continued part of the title until July 6th, 1867, after which date 
the title of the paper was The Trowbridge Chronicle, and West of 
England Advertiser. 

The " official" file for 1875 is imperfect, and it is easy to guess 
the reason : the publisher was " moving house," and in the confusion 
and extra work and worry the business of "filing" was neglected. 
There is the paper for February 20th, with the old imprint, and 
then a gap until July 3rd, which was "Printed and published by 
William Collins at his General Printing Works, Narrow Wine 
Street, and published by him at his residence in the Market Place." 
The first printing works were at the back of Mr. Collins's shop, 
abutting on St. James's churchyard; the premises he acquired in 
Narrow Wine Street were those which until then were known as 
the Temperance Hall. 

The change in the place of printing was, designedly or accidentally, 
a prelude to a change in the character of the paper. On August 
26th, 1876, it ceased to be partly printed in London, and was 
printed entirely in Trowbridge — as an editorial note explained, 



By J. J, Slade. 61 

to give facilities for printing ampler local news. Instead of eight 
pages it was four, but as the pages were considerably enlarged the 
Editor had, as he claimed, more room at his disposal : there were 
seven columns on a page, and the columns were lengthened from 
18J inches to 2i\ inches, the width being a fraction less than 
formerly. The Chronicle thus became a four-page " broadside," a 
popular shape at that date. Its title was changed to The Trow- 
bridge Chronicle, Bradford-on-Avon Times, and Melksham and 
Westbury Gazette, and the name of the publisher disappeared from 
beneath the title. 

This form of the paper did not long continue. With its first 
issue (January 5th) in 1878, it reverted to eight pages; the number 
of columns was reduced from seven to six, and the columns were 
20 \ inches long ; but again the net result was to give more space 
for local news, the whole of the pages being printed locally. 

In this form Mr. Collins was content to let his paper be for the 
remainder of his proprietorship, which came to an end in 1890. 
The Conservative party appear to have wanted a more uncompro- 
mising "organ" for what since 1885 had been the West Wilts 
Division ; and a syndicate of members of that party bought The 
Chronicle from its founder, and placed it under the management 
of Mr. J. M. Brindley, a former Conservative agent for the division, 
The change was announced on the 24th May, 1890, and it is ap- 
propriate to quote the testimony which was then given to the re- 
tiring founder and editor: — - 

" To follow the Trowbridge Chronicle through all its vicissitudes 
during [its] thirty years war with all sorts of conflicting opinions, re- 
ligious, political, and social — against strenuous opposition of all kinds ; 
sometimes from friends who wished to be in advance of the times ; more 
often from opponents who were averse to control in any shape or form 
— would be too great an undertaking for us at the present moment. 
Our purpose is to do honour to the founder of the Chronicle, who, 
single-handed, entered upon this risky enterprise ; battled his way 
manfully through all difficulties ; surmounted every obstacle ; and 
valiantly upheld and defended the principles which he propounded 
from the first ; and has the proud satisfaction of living to see those 
principles predominant." 

The change was indicated in the imprint on June 7th, 1890, 

when the name Collins, after appearing for nearly thirty years, 



62 Wiltshire Newspapers — Past and Present. 

gave way to the following : — " Printed and published by John 
Major Brindley for the Trowbridge and West Wilts Printing and 
Publishing Company, Ltd., at the Company's Printing Offices, 
Narrow Wine Street, Trowbridge." There was a link between the 
old management and the new; Mr. E. D. Bennett, a capable 
journalist of the old school, who was with Mr. Collins in the later 
years of his proprietorship, retained his post 

Under the new management the appearance of the front page 
was somewhat altered. On November 8th, 1890, the second part 
of the sub-title became " General Advertising Medium for Wiltshire" 
(instead of "for North and South Wilts"), and the Royal Arms 
became more flamboyant. 

In five years, however, came another change, again in the in- 
terests of the Conservative party in the division, whose champion 
in the electoral field was Colonel R. G. Chaloner. The paper be- 
came the property of a few Conservative leaders in the division, 
and on June 15th, 1895, the imprint announced that it was "printed 
and published by Thomas Ablott for the proprietor at the offices 
of the Trowbridge and West Wilts Printing and Publishing Com- 
pany, Narrow Wine Street, Trowbridge." Mr. Ablott, who came 
from the Eastern Counties, was also the editor, and under the new 
auspices, proprietorial and editorial, the Chronicle became more 
ambitious. On the 6th July it appeared with seven columns on a 
page (eight pages), the columns being within a fraction of 24 inches 
in length, but with the width unchanged. An editorial notice 
stated : — 

"To-day this journal emerges from the region of Local Journalism 
and assumes the rank and importance of a County Newspaper." 

It claimed to be, in its new form, the largest newspaper iii 
Wiltshire ; its politics were described as " broadly Constitutional 
and Unionist." Its title became The Wiltshire Chronicle, with 
which is incorporated the Trowbridge Chronicle, Bradford-on-Avon 
Times, and Melksham and Westbury Gazette. A few months later 
there was a slight change in imprint, which on October 12th, 1895, 
became : — " Printed and published by Thomas Ablott for the pro- 
prietors of the West Wilts Printing Company, Ltd., at their offices, 



By J, J. Slade. 63 

31, Market Place, and Narrow Wine Street, Trowbridge." The 
Market Place publishing office, however, was not the same as the 
original home of the paper. 

The political tone of The Chronicle became yet more vigorous 
and pointed, and in the spring of 1899 an endeavour was made to 
extend the sphere of its activity in the party interest. Swindon, 
in the Northern Parliamentary Division, had not an advowedly 
Conservative paper published there, and it was added to the Chronicle 
district, the pages of the paper being at the same time enlarged 
from seven columns to eight columns. 

Twelve months later there was another change of proprietorship 
and management. The proprietary of 1895, the chief member of 
whom is understood to have been Mr. G. LI. Palmer, was enlarged to 
a limited liability company, with Mr. George W. Kose and Mr. 
Henry Bottomley as managing directors. Both were Trowbridge 
townsmen ; and Mr. Bottomley, whose name appeared in 
the imprint for the first time (as representing the West 
Wilts Printing Company) on May 5th, 1900, had for 
some years been a member of the literary staff of the 
Wiltshire Times. Under the new auspices the area covered by 
the paper was contracted, as was the paper itself, the columns on 
a page going from eight to seven. At the same time new offices 
were built, in Manvers Street, and the first issue from these 
premises was on January 19th, 1901. At the end of 1902 Mr, 
Bottomley took over the concern on his own responsibility, and 
made a further reduction in size, the columns being shortened by 
an inch on November 1st, 1902. On June 3rd, 1905, the size of 
the page was further reduced, to six columns. In February, 1906, 
; Mr. Bottomley filed his petition in bankruptcy; the Wiltshire 
Chronicle was issued for the last time on March 24th, and in June 
of the same year (1906) the printing plant was dispersed by public 
auction. The copyright in the title of the paper was retained, it 
is understood, but this was in fact the end of the paper founded 
by William Collins nearly half a century before. 

Note may be made of the fact that in the last months of Mr. 
Bottomley 's ownership he issued the Bradford-on-Avon Observer, 



64 Wiltshire Newspapers — Past and Present, 



and District Intelligencer, which was stated to be published at 6, 
Silver Street, Bradford-on-Avon. A comparison of this with the 
Wiltshire Chronicle showed that it was a localized edition of the 
latter. It does not, therefore, require further description. Of 
course it did not survive the Chronicle. 

After an interval of nearly four years another paper was printed 
and published in Trowbridge. This was The West Wilts Post — 
"Printed and published by George Samuel Bose for the West 
Wilts Post Co., Ltd, 66, Fore Street, Trowbridge, and Church 
Street, Westbury, Wilts." The price was a half -penny. It was 
an eight-page paper; six columns on a page; columns 18 inches 
long by 2 J inches wide. The object of the venture was stated in 
an introduction written by the Bt. Hon. W. H. Long, M.P, (under 
his name), of which the opening passages were: — 

" Up to now the people of West Wilts, with whom will shortly rest 
the responsible task of selecting a representative for Parliament, have 
been labouring under a serious disadvantage. Knowledge of both sides 
of a cause is always necessary before a just decision can be arrived at, 
and for some years the electors of this division have had no opportunity 
of studying fairly and squarely, in their local paper, both points of view 
of the great political questions of the day. Only one point of view has 
been brought before them — by a paper which did not pretend to be 
impartial, and which was advisedly written with a strong partizan 
colour. Without desiring to impugn the character and conduct of the 
Badical organ to which I refer, it must be obvious to all fair-minded 
and thoughtful men that this was a state of affairs which, in the public 
interest, should not be allowed to continue ; and it is with the object 
of giving the people of West Wilts the opportunity of studying and 
understanding National and Imperial questions from the Unionist 
point of view that this paper is being started." 

The West Wilts Post, therefore, was frankly started for party 
purposes, and the pending political event referred to by Mr. Long 
was the general election which took place in January, 1910, when 
the Unionist candidate was Mr. Bobert Long. Mr. Long was not 
successful ; but the Post was continued, and at the general election 
at the end of the same year it championed the cause of Mr. 
Llewellin Palmer, who also was unsuccessful. A by-election for 
West Wilts came in February, 1911, when Sir John Fuller, the 
sitting member, received a Colonial Governorship, and this led to 






By J. J. Slade. 65 

a further development of party journalism. The Bath Daily 
Chronicle, an evening newspaper, was used to forward Mr. Palmer's 
renewed candidature, and a month or two after the electoral pro- 
ceedings were concluded on April 1st, 1911, the West Wilts Post 
appeared as " Printed for the proprietor by the Bath Daily and 
Weekly Chronicle and Argus, Limited, and published by G-eorge 
Samuel Eose at the offices, 66, Fore Street, Trowbridge." This 
issue was considerably larger than the old Post, being in fact the 
Bath paper " localized," but it need not be further described, as it 

| was but the link between the old Post and a new newspaper — The 
Wiltshire News. 

On May 5th, 1911, The Wiltshire Neivs made its first appearance, 
and that is the latest chapter in the history of the Conservative 

| journalism of Trowbridge, which this outline will show has been 
" party " rather than " personal " journalism since the retirement 
of Mr. William Collins in 1890, There were, in the years imme- 
diately succeeding, fluctuations in the size of The Wiltshire News, 
chiefly in the number of its pages, which were sometimes eight, 
sometimes ten, sometimes twelve ; there was less rigidness in this 
respect than in the older newspapers, which were all, in the non- 
political sense, conservative. The latest change of size, however, 
was a change of form and appearance too radical to be dismissed 
with the rest. The paper approximated more to the style of some 
old Miscellanies, or the earlier illustrated weeklies. The page was 
reduced to four columns, 17 inches long by 2f inches wide; the 
number of pages was increased, and at present they number sixteen. 
There is marked contrast between this, the newest style of Wiltshire 
weekly, and the big broadsheets which were the vogue half-a-century 
ago. The machinery at that time was not well adapted for printing 
more than four pages, and extra space was obtained as required by 
lengthening and widening the pages. 

The earlier fluctuations in size of the Wiltshire News were in 
part the result of extensions of the sphere of operations to the 
other Parliamentary divisions of the county, notably North Wilts 
and South Wilts, there being offices at Swindon and Salisbury. 
The development in South Wilts involved the absorption — that is, 
VOL. XL. — NO. CXXVII. F 



66 Wiltshire Newspapers— Past and Present. 

the disappearance — of the old Wilts County Mirror (which will be' 
dealt with in a future article). As that journal itself had acquired a 
number of copyrights of vanished newspapers the full title as it 
runs to-day is as follows :— Wiltshire Hews, with which is incor-' 
porated the West Wilts Post, The Wiltshire County Mirror and 
Express, The Salisbury and Wiltshire Herald, The South Wilts 
Express, The Salisbury Advertiser, 1858, and The Salisbury Standard ,. 
1869." The Salisbury offices were afterwards closed, and the News 
is now "Printed and published by Frederick Charles Barber, on 
behalf of the proprietors, the Wessex Associated Press, Limited, at 
their offices, 33, Westgate Street, in the City of Bath, and published 
also by him at 8, Eegent Street, Swindon, and 65, Fore Street, 
Trowbridge." These Wiltshire offices are those which were es- 
tablished originally ; the Salisbury offices were, of course, the 
Mirror offices, on the Canal. A change in the title of the Company 
will be noticed; it was made soon after the Wiltshire side of the 
business was added to the Bath side, when new capital was raised' 
among the Conservative Party in West Wilts, and Mr. G-. LlJ 
Palmer joined the board of directors. 



The Wilts and Gloucestershire Standard. 

The Wilts and Gloucestershire Standard was established at 
Malmesbury on the 28th of January, 1837, six months before the' 
death of William IV., taking as its motto "Pro Eege, Lege, Aria 
et Focis," and although the accession of a queen to the throne might 
have suggested the alteration of "Eege" into the feminine form,, 
the original phrase "was preserved and became once more literally 
applicable with the succession of King Edward VII., though not 
till after an interval of sixty-four years. Of the early history of 
the paper — that is to say, its first fourteen or fifteen years — it is ] 
not possible for 'the present writer to give very many details be- 
yond those derived from the files in the British Museum, the only 
file locally available being that now kept in the office at Cirencester, 
which was started in 1851 by the late Mr. George Henry Harmer, 
when his connection with the paper began — a connection that 



ByJ.J.Slade. 67 

continued for the long period of sixty years, till his death on Jan. 
16th, 1911, during two-thirds of which time he was responsible 
for the conduct of the journal. He was afterwards joined by other 
members of his family, in whose hands it now is. 

The Standard was founded in the Conservative interest, more 
especially to serve the northern portion of Wiltshire and the 
adjoining portion of Gloucestershire, several leading Wiltshire 
gentlemen being concerned in the project, of whom Mr. Joseph 
Neeld, of Grittleton, M.P. for Chippenham, was the chief. The 
acting spirit in the undertaking was " an Attorney from London." 
Who exactly this gentleman was cannot now be stated with cer- 
tainty, though the name of " Hindmarsh " is an ancient tradition 
in the office. 

As the law with regard to the registration of owners of news- 
papers was in a chaotic state previous to the passing of the News- 
paper Libel and Eegistration Act of 1881, it is not possible to give 
I the name or names of the early proprietor or proprietors. The 
i imprint of the first number, January 28th, 1837, is as follows: — 
I " Malmesbury. — Printed for the proprietors by Matthew Barnett, 
I residing in the High Street in the parish of St. Paul in the town 
i of Malmesbury, and published by him at the Standard Printing 
Works, situate in Oxford Street in the said town, Saturday, 28th 
; January, 1837." 

The paper was at the outset a four-page production, having five 
I columns to the page, and the first number contained a declaration 
i of policy addressed " To the nobility, gentry, clergy, and inhabitants 
generally of the counties of Wilts and Gloucester," The manage- 
ment promised " a peculiarly vigilant attention to those agricultural, 
manufacturing, and commercial interests which characterise these 
'Counties," and as regards the political course intended to be pursued, 
it was founded on the deliberately adopted motto already mentioned : 
" Pro Kege, Lege, Aris et Focis " — " For the King, the Law, our 
Altars and our Hearths." That motto, it was asserted (in the 
full-bodied rhetoric of the period) 






"Contains the prime elements, the very pith and marrow of genuine 
Conservatism, which we know to be the only solid basis on which our 

F 2 



68 Wiltshire Newspapers — Past and Present. 






glorious Constitution can stand, and the real liberties of the People be 
supported consistently with due reverence for the law, the preservation 
of the unimpaired establishments of the Church, the maintenance of 
the just prerogatives of the Monarch, and of the privileges of the 
Hereditary Aristocracy of the land." 

lb is probable that the establishment of the Wilts and Gloucester- 
shire Standard was in a small and local way one of the symptoms 
of the reaction which swept over the country as a result of the 
violence and inexperience of some of the members of the Keformed 
Parliament which met in 1833. This reaction was marked by Sir 
Robert Peel's short-lived ministry, but in 1835 a general election 
had replaced Lord Melbourne and the Whigs in office, and the 
"Country Party" were up in arms. In its address to its readers 
the new paper reminded "the intelligent gentry and the sturdy 
yeomen of Wilts and Gloucestershire" that they were 

" Living in extraordinary times," when " even the very measures of 
Ministers of the Crown themselves are founded on principles tending 
to subvert and bring into contempt that glorious edifice of political 
wisdom " (the British Constitution). 

The address proceeded to ask " the men of Wilts and Gloucester 1 
whether they could 

" allow the fierce spirit of licentious Democracy, urged on by the 
double-headed monster of Popery and Infidelity, to acquire such fearful 
ascendancy as to threaten every point of the social edifice with de- j 
struction and finally rage uncontrolled through the realm." 

Having answered this question with an emphatic " No, they will 
not!" the address went on to hail "the rapid increase of the 
Conservative Press " as one of the means whereby this "No- 
mighfc be converted into action, the new paper being proclaimed 
as one of the means to this end : — 

" Strange as it may at first sight appear, the large and important 
district of North-West Wilts and Eastern Gloucestershire is utterly 
unrepresented in the Press, and is without an organ to speak its senti 
ments, to direct its energies, and confront its foes." 

The inhabitants of this "important district, containing the 
richest parts of these highly intelligent, wealthy, and agricultural 
counties, studded with the seats of the landed gentry, with th 
farmhouses of as respectable a yeomanry as any part of Englaix 



By J. J. Slade. 69 

can boast, and the smiling cottages of a contented and honest 
peasantry, truly as the poet says, ' their country's pride,'" were 
accordingly adjured to "flock around the Standard of Conservatism 
which we now unfurl to the winds." 

With its issue of July 4th, 1840, the Wilts and]Qlouccster shire 
Standard was enlarged to six instead of five columns on a page, 
the columns being 23 inches in length, and its place of publication 
was Cirencester instead of Malmesbury, the latter town evidently 
not affording sufficient scope to the new venture. The leading 
article in which these changes were announced declared unfaltering 
allegiance to the principles previously professed and expounded, 
and in explanation and justification of the removal it was pointed 
out that " the town of Cirencester is both better situated for the 
convenience of our subscribers," and "from the arrangement of 
its posts we shall be enabled to receive our papers and letters at 
an hour more suitable for publication." The printer of the paper 
at this time was Daniel Bretherton, and he continued to be the 
publisher for some few years after the removal to Cirencester, 
being described in the imprint as "residing at Cecily Hill," in that 
town, the printing office being situated in the Market Place. The 
imprint was followed by a list of country and London newsagents 
who supplied the paper, from which it would seem that the Standard 
had some sort of circulation in London, for one of the agents was 
the late Mr. C. Mitchell, of 12, Red Lion Court, Fleet Street, the 
founder of "Mitchell's Newspaper Press Directory," who after- 
wards enlarged that shop by taking the next one, No. 13, where 
the firm continued as Mitchell & Co , until it removed to its 
present extensive building at Snow Hill, Holborn Viaduct. The 
I imprint of the last number issued at Malmesbury advanced the 
claim that it was "the only newspaper published within a circum- 
ference of one hundred and twenty miles." 

For some time after its transference to Cirencester the Standard 
was published at the house in Dyer-street now occupied by Dr. 
Mackinnon, which was the residence of the proprietor. Later it 
was removed to Castle Street, to the premises now occupied by the 
Cirencester Conservative Benefit Society's offices, where the 



70 Wiltshire Newspapers — Past and Present. 

publisher, John Cooksey (who succeeded Daniel Bretherton), resided, 
the proprietor being Mr. Henry Elderton, who lived at the Cran- 
hams. The price of the paper was five pence. In spite of the 
transference to the larger and busier town of Cirencester, and 
although there was at that time no other paper published nearer 
than Devizes on the Wiltshire side, or than Gloucester and Chel- 
tenham on the Gloucestershire side, the Standard does not appear 
to -have attained any very great measure of prosperity in those 
early days, and stories are handed down that the publisher, 
Cooksey, had to make occasional journeys to Gloucester Gaol as 
hostage for the payment of the Advertisement Tax and Paper 
Duty, which, though easy of imposition, were difficult of realisation 
by the struggling press of those times. 

In 1851 the Standard was confronted by further difficulties in 
the shape of a sturdy local competitor, the Cirencester and Swindon 
Express and North Wiltshire and Gotswold Advertiser, printed and 
published by Thomas Philip Baily and George Jones at their 
printing office, Market Place, Cirencester. The first number of 
the Cirencester and Swindon Express was brought out on May 24th, 
1851, the prospectus being written by the Rev. C. H. Newmarch, 
who was afterwards for many years a frequent and valued con- 
tributor. The paper consisted of eight pages of "Times" size, six 
of the pages being printed in London, and filled with general 
reading and intelligence, the first and last pages being devoted to 
advertisements and local news. The price of the new paper was 
four pence, as announced in the following extract from the pro- 
spectus : — 

''Feeling that no relief is at present to be looked for from the 
Government in respect of the ' Taxes on Knowledge,' the Proprietors 
of the Cirencester and Swindon Express have determined to take a 
step in advance, and so far as they are concerned, virtually to repeal 
both the stamp upon the paper and the duty on advertisements by not 
charging either to their subscribers. The price of the paper will there- 
fore be four pence, instead of five (the usual price), and the scale for 
advertisements will be reduced by the amount of the Government duty." 

The same document announced that the paper would " not ex- 
press any political opinions," and this policy of neutrality was 
continued for some years. 



By J. J. Slade. 71 

In less than nine months the Wilts and Gloucestershire Standard 
surrendered to its vigorous young rival. On January 24th, 1852, 
the Cirencester and Swindon Express came out with the following 
announcement : — 

"The Proprietors of the Cirencester and Swindon Express beg to 
announce to their Subscribers, Advertisers, and the Public that they 
have arranged with the Proprietors of the Wilts and Gloucestershire 
Standard for the purchase of their newspaper, and that henceforth the 
paper will be conducted and published under the title of the Wilts and 
Gloucestershire Standard and Cirencester and Swindon Express, price 
fourpence-half penny." 

On the same date the old management of the Wilts and Glouces- 
tershire Standard issued its farewell address, claiming credit for 
having so conducted the paper that during the preceding fifteen 
years it had been " counted as an unbending advocate of those 
great principles which form the basis of the Constitution," a stern 
opponent of " Infidelity and Popery," and so on, but pathetically 
announcing that " the future will be worked out by other hands " : — 



" Start not, gentle reader ! The Standard is about to undergo a 
transmogrification, to be united by an irrevocable bond to the Cirencester 
and Swindon Express." 



The reasons which had led to this " transmogrification " were 
passed over with discreet silence, and the belief was dutifully ex- 
pressed that under the new title and new proprietors "it will 
continue to meet in its new form the same support which has been 
accorded to us during so many years." 

The price for the amalgamated paper, fourpence-half-penny, was 
fixed by way of " splitting the difference" between the Standard's 
five pence "and the Express's four pence. On October 1st, 1853, 
lowever, the price was raised to five pence, On August 27th, 
1853, the imprint shows that Mr. Thomas Philip Baily relinquished 
his interest in the paper, which was henceforth carried on by his 
former partner, Mr. George Jones, a man of much ability, who 
added to his journalistic preoccupations the profession of an 
auctioneer and the duties of Town Surveyor to the Cirencester 
Town Improvement Commissioners, the old governing body of the 
town. 



72 Wiltshire Newspapers — Past and Present, 

The repealing of the Advertisement Duty in 1853 gave an im- 
petus to trade advertising, and the Standard soon found that its 
two locally printed pages were insufficient for its needs. Ac- 
cordingly, an extra sheet was frequently published, in fact, the 
issue of this supplement became an almost weekly feature towards 
the end of 1853, and when the extra sheet was not published, a 
page of local news and advertisements was set up in type at 
Cirencester and sent by rail to London to be included in the 
printed sheets to be supplied for the coming issue. By the middle 
of 1854 the publication of the extra sheet had been discontinued, 
and four of the eight pages instead of two were occupied by ad 
vertisements and local news, the other four pages of general news 
being printed in London. It is probable that by this time the 
practice of sending pages of type to London to be included in the 
current issue had been discontinued, for there is a story in the 
office that on one occasion the iron box in which the page of type 
was enclosed for its journey was so vigorously handled by the 
railway employes that the contents had to be returned to the 
office in a sack ! Whether the editorial vocabulary was equal to 
dealing adequately with the situation is not recorded. But the 
incident led first to the printing of four pages at home, and a little 
later all the eight pages were so printed. 

On July 7th, 1855, on the abolition of the compulsory newspaper 
stamp, with the accompanying liberty to issue an unstamped 
edition, such an edition was published at the price of four pence, 
the stamped edition (for postage) being still five pence. On October 
5th, 1861, the repeal of the Paper Duty led to a further reduction 
to four pence stamped and three pence unstamped. 

From 1853 to 1869 Mr. George Jones was the publisher and 
ostensible proprietor of the paper, the editorial and publishing- 
offices being for some time at his residence in Black Jack Street, 
the printing offices being on the present premises in Dyer Street 
and Lewis Lane, whither the editorial and publishing offices were 
afterwards transferred. These premises were in pre-railway days 
occupied by the stables and warehouses of Tanner & Bayliss, pro- 
prietors of the stage waggons plying between Cirencester and 



By J. J. Slade. 73 

London. Among those connected with Mr. Jones in a proprietory 
interest in the paper was a Mr. Russell, who was an usher in the 
Eolls Court at Westminster, but what connection lie had with 
Cirencester is unknown. 

In July, 1869, Mr. Jones disposed of the Standard, and it ap- 
peared on July 17th of that year as " Printed and published by 
George Henry Harmer," who had been engaged upon it, first as 
reporter, and afterwards charged with the active management, 
since 1851. Mr. William Flux was the new proprietor. The 
paper now abandoned the political neutrality imposed on it by the 
amalgamation of 1852, and once more became a frank and outspoken 
Conservative organ. 

For a few years about this time Richard Jefferies was a member 
of the Standard literary staff as chief reporter, residing at Swindon 
and journeying to other parts of the district as his duties required. 
Much of his journalistic work appears in the pages of the Standard, 
including a " History of Cirencester," published week by week, 
Jefferies was still on the Standard staff when he wrote to the Times 
the letters entitled "The Wiltshire Labourer" which first brought 
him before a wider public. Much of Jefferies' early literary work 
derived its inspiration and its local colouring from his journalistic 
experiences on the Wilts and Gloucestershire Standard. This was 
especially the case in regard to his series of articles, afterwards 
published in book form, entitled "Hodge and His Masters." In this 
series the paper on "Fleeceborough" is an almost exact description 
of Cirencester and its institutions as they were in Jefferies' day. 
The meetings of the Chamber of Agriculture afforded material for 
another article, and in that entitled " The Country Newspaper " 
he gave a faithful description of the Standard and its editoiial 
offices, together with a pen portrait of his chief, Mr. George Henry 
Harmer. 

On February 11th, 1882, the price was reduced to two pence, 
and October 16th, 1886, to one penny, Mr. G. H. Harmer about 
this time succeeding Mr. Flux as proprietor. On January 7th, 
1893 — up to which date the original size of eight Times sized pages 
of six columns each had been retained — the claims of advertisers 



74 Wiltshire Newspapers — Past and Present, 

and local news throughout a widened district necessitated an en- 
largement of the paper to eight pages of seven longer columns per 
page, the columns measuring 23§ inches of type. The paper con- 
tinued under individual proprietorship till 1902, when the business 
was transformed into a private family limited liability company, 
with the late Mr. G. H. Harmer as chairman and managing director. 
Mr. George Harmer died on January 16th, 1911, having given 
sixty out of the eighty years of his life in loyal and unwearied 
service to the paper with which he became associated as a youth, 
and having striven, with no small measure of success, to make it 
an instrument for promoting the best interests of the district. He 
was succeeded as chairman and editor by his nephew, Mr. W. 
Scotford Harmer, who had been associated from his boyhood with 
his uncle, and who is assisted by other members of the family. 

It remains to be added that among the effects of the war, and 
the consequent shortage and dearness of paper, have been the re- 
duction in size or the increase in price, or both, of most of the 
newspapers in the country. The size of the Wilts and Gloucester- 
shire Standard has temporarily been reduced from seven to six 
columns of 23J inches per page, and on March 10th, 1917, the 
price was raised to three-halfpence, followed by a further increase 
to two pence on May 19th, 1917. 

[To he continued."] 



75 



WILTS OBITUARY. 
Brigr.-Gen. John Arthur Tanner, C.B , G.M6., D.S.O., 

R.E. Killed in action in France, July, 1917. B. 1858. S. of J. 
Tanner, of Poulton, nr. Marlborough. Entered army June, 1877, pro- 
moted Lt.-Col. July, 1906, and retired April, 1914. He was on the 
General Staff in India 1910 to 1913. Served in Mahsoud Waziri Ex- 
pedition 1881, and the Sudan Expedition 1885, in Burmah 1885 — 88, 
where he gained the D.S.O., the (Jhitral Expedition 1895, and on the 
N.W, Frontier 1897. He did admirable service as an engineer at the 
front in France. 

Obit, notices, Wiltshire Gazette, July 25th ; Times, July 26th ; Por- 
trait, Daily Sketch, July 28th, 1917. 

Major Henry Molyneux Paget Howard, 19th Earl 

Of Suffolk and 12th Earl of Berkshire, killed in action in Mesopo- 
tamia, April 21st, 1917. Buried on the battlefield. Eldest son of 18th 
Earl, b. 1877. Educated at Winchester. Succeeded his father 1898, 
and in the same year accompanied Lord Curzon to India as A.D.C., 

I where he kept a pack of hounds near Calcutta. Returning from India 
in 1904 he married that year Marguerite Hyde, youngest d. of L. Z. 
Leiter, of Washington, U.S.A., sister of Lady Curzon, and settled down 
at Charlton Park. He was a prominent sportsman, especially interested 
in hunting and racing, owning racehorses himself, and was a member 
of the Jockey Club and National Hunt Committee. He had a pack of 
Harriers at Charlton. He was a Captain in the Gloucestershire Militia 
and when the Territorials were first organised in 1908 he undertook to 
raise a battery, The Wiltshire Battery, 3rd Wessex Brigade, B.F.A., of 
which he became the Major commanding. He went to India in 1914 
with the Wessex Division, and late in 1916 went with his battery to 
France. He was a member of the Wilts County Council, and the 
Malmesbury Rural District Council, and a J. P. for Wilts— but took 
no prominent part in local administration. 

He leaves three sons, Charles Hen. George, Viscount Andover, b. 
1906, who succeeds to the title, Cecil b. 1908, and Greville b. 1909. 

Obit, notices, Times, and Wiltshire Gazette, April 26th, 1917. 

CJapt. William Herbert Bamforidge, killed in action in 

France Aug. 19th, 1917, aged 27. Only son of William Samuel Bam- 
bridge, Mus. B., of Marlborough. Educated at Marlborough College, 
went to Canada, came back to train as a singer at the Royal Academy 
of Music, afterwards played in musical comedy at the Adelphi. En- 
listed in Public Schools Battalion of the Royal Fusiliers and subse- 
quently received a commission. H e had been at the front about a year, 
and was gazetted Captain iu June last. 

Obit, notice, Wiltshire Gazette, Aug. 30th, 1917. 



76 Wilts Obituary. 

Capt. Eric Francis Brown, Wilts Regt. Died of wounds in 

Mesopotamia March 31st, 1917. Third son of J. W. Brown, of Eastrop 
Grange, Highworth. Educated at Harrow and Brasenose College, 
Oxford. Enlisted in Public Schools Battalion, commissioned in Wilts 
Regt. Oct., 1914, went with 5th Wilts to Gallipoli, and was one of 
the last to leave at the evacuation. Went through the campaigns for 
the relief and capture of Kut and Bagdad. His two brothers have won 
the Military Cross in France. He was a musician and organ scholar at 
Brasenose. 

Obit, notice, Wiltshire Gazette, April 19th, 1917. 

Capt. and Adjutant Geoffrey Stafford Wallington, 

K.R.R.C. Killed in action Sept. 19th, 1917. Elder son of Col. Charles 
Wallington and grandson of the late Sir John Wallington, of Keevil. 
Born 1898. Educated at Eton, 1910—1915, where he played in the 
Eton XI. in 1915, and was prominent in athletics and in the O.T.C. 
Went to Sandhurst, Aug., 1915 ; joined 60th Rifles, Dec, 1915 ; went 
to the front, July, 1916; promoted Lieutenant, 1917; appointed 
Adjutant and Captain, May, 1917, and mentioned in despatches. 

Obit, notices, Wiltshire Gazette, Oct. 4th ; Country Life, with por- 
trait, Nov. 3rd, 1917. 

Lieut. Noel Gr. B. King, Wilts Regt., aged 31. Killed in action at 
Messines, June 7th, 1917. Only s. of Rev. Gilbert A. King. Vicar of 
Easterton. 

Lieut. David Clutterbuck (R.F.A.). died of wounds May 6th, 
1917. B. Sept. 21st, 1890. 2nd s. of E. H. Clutterbuck, of Hardenhuish 
Park. Educated at Horris Hill, Winchester College, and University 
College, Oxford, where he held a scholarship. He held an appointment 
in the Chinese Customs at Mukden and Peking, returned to England 
in 1915 and received a commission in R.F.A- He went to France July,, 
1915, and was in action on the Somme, the Ancre, and Vimy Ridge, 
was mentioned in despatches, April 9th, 1917, and recommended for 
the Military Cross. 

Obit, notices, Wiltshire Gazette, May 17th ; The Wykehamist, Julq 
21st, 1917. 

Lieut. Arthur Sidney Dunne, 6th Inniskilling Dragoons, killed 
in action July 2nd, 1917, aged 25. S. of A. M . Dunne, of The Highlands, 
Calne. Educated at Eton and Sandhurst, 1911 — 12 ; first commission, 
Jan. 22nd, 1913. 

Lieut. W. T. Granger, Wilts Regt., died of wounds Sept., 1917, 
aged 24. Born at Chippenham. S. of T. Grainger. Assistant Scout- 
master of Boy Scouts at Chippenham and afterwards Swindon, where 
he was employed in the G. VV.R. Works. He enlisted in 4th Wilts, and 
went to India on the outbreak of w 7 ar, was gazetted 2nd Lieut., Nov., 
1915, and went to France, Jan., 1916. 

Obit, notice, Wiltshire Gazette, Oct. 4th, 1917. 



Wilts Obituary. 77 

Lieut. Douglas CrOW Brown, Machine Gun Corps, killed in 
action Sept., 1917, aged 25. Second s. of J. W. Brown, of Eastrop 
Grange, High worth. Educated at Harrow. Commissioned in 
Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry at the beginning of the war, subse- 
quently went to Sandhurst, and was gazetted to Royal Scots. Went 
to France, 1915, served at Ypres, joined Machine Gun Corps, and was 
severely wounded on the Somme, July, 1916. Returned to the front, 
June, 1917. He played cricket for the County of Wilts. 
Obit, notice, Wiltshire Gazette. Sept. 17th, 1917. 

Lieut. Roger Bolton Hay, M.C., 3rd Batt. W. Yorks Regt., 

and Royal Flying Corps, died of wounds as prisoner of war July 17th, 
1917. Youngest s. of Rev. R. W. Hay, late Rector of Garsdon. Edu- 
cated Dean Close School (1906—8) ; Cheltenham and Blundells, 
Tiverton (1908—14). Joined Public Schools Battalion on outbreak of 
war. Commissioned in Special Reserve Jan., 1915. Went to front in 
W. Yorks Regiment, Feb., 1916. Returned Aug., 1916, and joined 
R.F.C. Went to front again and gained the M.C. 

Obit, notice, with portrait, Wiltshire Gazette, Sept. 6th, 1917. 

Lieut. Charles Herbert Sainsbury, Wilts Regt. Killed in 

action in France, June 7th, 1917. Aged 28. Eldest s. of Herbert 
Sainsbury, of Greystone House, Devizes. A clerk in the Capital and 
Counties Bank when war broke out, received commission May, 1915 
and joined 1st Wilts in France Nov., 1915. Gained the Military Cross 
for the capture of a mine crater, June, 1916. 
Obit, notice, Wiltshire Gazette, June 14th, 1917. 

2nd. Lieut. James Chester Badgley, Wilts Regt. Killed in 

action in France, June 7th, 1917. Aged 29. Youngest s. of Colonel 
Badgley, of Long St., Devizes. Enlisted in Canadian contingent at 
Quebec, 1914. Transferred to Wilts Regt. Feb. 4th, 1915, on receiving 
commission. Wounded at Trones Wood, 1916. 
Obit, notice, Wiltshire Gazette, June 14th, 1917. 

2nd .-Lieut. Nelson Stewart Hibberd, N. Lanes. Regt. 

Killed in action June, 1917. S. of A. Hibberd, of Bradford-on-Avon. 
Served seven years in 7th Hussars, and afterwards was employed at 
Messrs. Spencer Moultons, at Bradford-on-Avon. Well known as a 
football player there and at Portsmouth. Rejoined his regt. on out- 
break of war and went with first expeditionary force to Belgium, takino- 
part in the retreat from Mons. Given a commission in N. Lanes. Regt. 
Jan., 1916. Spent some time training troops in England and returned 
to the front March, 1917. 

Obit, notice and portrait, Wiltshire Iwies, July 28th, 1917. 

2nd.-Lieut. Thomas Penruddocke, Wilts Regt. Killed in 

action April 25th, 1917, aged 19. Youngest s. of Charles Penruddocke, 
of Compton Park. B. 1897. Educated at Clifton College, Bristol 



78 Wilts Obituary. 

University, O.T.C. Commissioned Nov., 1915 ; wounded at La Boiselle, 
July, 1916, and invalided home ; rejoined Nov., 1916. 

Obit, notices, Wiltshire Gazette, May 10th ; Court Journal, May 
18th, 1917. 

2nd.-I.ieut. George Peak Garland, killed in action at Messines, 

June 7th, 1917, aged 30. Eldest s. of James Peak Garland, of West 
Farm, Winterbourne Monkton, and formerly of Church Farm, Hed- 
dington. A sergeant in the Wilts Yeomanry at the outbreak of war he 
went to France in 1916, and early in 1917 was given a commission in 
the Inniskilling Fusiliers. 

Obit, notice, Wiltshire Gazette, June 21st, 1917. 

2nd -Iiieut, Walter Weekes, killed in action April 23rd, 1917. 
B. 1894. Eldest s. of Rev. W. H. Weekes, of Devizes. Educated St. 
John's School, Leatherhead, entered Merchant Service and went round 
the world in a sailing ship. On outbreak of war he enlisted in Oxford 
and Bucks Light Infantry and went to the front, afterwards com- 
missioned in Lincolnshire Regt. 

Obit, notice, Wiltshire Gazette, May 3rd, 1917. 

2nd.-Lieut. Prank Bower, Northumb. Fusiliers, attached R. 
Flying Corps. Died of wounds received March 31st, 1917. Younger s. 
of Joshua Bower, of Somerford Keynes. Received his commission 
Aug., 1916. 

Obit, notice, Salisbury Journal, April 14th, 1917. 

2nd.-X»ient. W. H. Dickson, Loyal N. Lanes. Regt., killed in 
action June 7th, 1917. S. of G. H. Dickson, solicitor, Preston. Edu- 
cated at Cheltenham. Articled to his father's firm (Buck & Dicksons). 
Practised as solicitor at Chippenham. Joined London Scottish a year 
ago, gained commission and went to the front, was wounded, and re- 
joined his regt. 

Obit, notice, Wiltshire Gazette, July 12th, 1917. 

2nd-Lieut. Osmund Bartle Wordsworth, killed in action 

near Arras, April 2nd, 1917, aged 29. Youngest son of Canon Chris- 
topher Wordsworth, Sub-Dean of Salisbury. Scholar of Winchester 
and Trin, Coll., Cambridge. 1st Class Classical Tripos, afterwards 
Lecturer at Selwyn Coll. (1911—14), Classical Teacher, Trinity Coll., 
Toronto, 1914 — 15. With his sister he was saved from the Lusitania 
on his return to England to join the army. He was given a temporary 
commission in the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry in 1915, being 
afterwards transferred to the 21st Machine Gun Corps, with which he 
went to France in Sept., 1916. He was the author of a novel, "A 
Happy Exchange," by " Herbert B. Thornley." Heath. Cranton. 1915. 
Full obit, notice, The WyJcehamist, July 21st ; Wiltshire Gazette, 
April 26th, 1917. 






Wilts Obituary. 79 

2nd-Iiieut. A. A. Steward, R.F.A , attached R.F.C. Killed in 
action Oct. 6th, 1917. Younger son of Canon Steward, Rector of 
Boyton. Educated at Wellington and Magdalen Coll., Oxford. B.A., 
1911. Served in S. African War as an officer in the Norfolk Militia. 
Ordained Deacon, 1912; Priest, 1913 (York); Curate of St. Paul's, 
Hull, 1912—14; Curate of St. Mary's, Johannesburg, 1914. On out- 
break of war he returned to England, received commission in R.F.A. 
as combatant officer, 1915; went to front, 1916; and was recently 
transferred to R.F.C. Married, 1912, Miriam, d. of S. H. Carver, of 
Alexandria. 

Obit, notice, Wiltshire Gazette, Oct. 18th, 1917. 

The Rev. Sir Vyell Donnithorne Vyvyan, 9th Baronet of 

Trelowarren, Cornwall. B. 1826, died May 27th, 1917, aged 90. St. 
John's Coll., Camb., and St. Aidan's, 1852. Deacon, 1854 ; Priest, 
1855 (Heref.) ; Curate of Churchstoke (Montgomery), 1854 — 55 ; Rector 
of Winterbourne Monkton (Dors.), 1856 — 66 ; Vicar of Broad Hinton 
and Diocesan Inspector of Schools, 1866 — 77 ; Rector of Withiel, Corn- 
wall, 1877 — 79. He succeeded his uncle in the baronetcy and the 
Trelowarren Estate in 1879. He married, 1857, Louisa M. F., 3rd d. of 
R. Bourchier, of Brook Lodge, Dorset, who died 1907. Three sons and 
a daughter survive him, and the Baronetcy passes to his eldest son, 
Col. Courtenay Bourchier Vyvyan, C.B., C.M.G., Assistant Adjutant 
Genera] at the War Office. 

Obit, notice, Guardian, May 31st, 1917. 

Hie Rev. Canon Francis Warre, died Sept. 15th, 1917, aged 

83. Buried at Bemerton. S. of Henry Warre, of Bindon House, 
Wellington, Somerset. Educated at Eton and Balliol Coll., Oxford, 
B.A., 1857 ; M.A., 1860 ; Deacon, 1858 ; Priest, 1859 (Glouc. & Bristol) ; 
Curate of Olveston (Gloucs.), 1857 — 63 ; Vicar of Bere Regis with 
Winterbourne Kingston, 1864—76 : Vicar of Melksham, 1876—90 ; 
Rural Dean of Bradford-on-Avon, 1888 — 90 ; Canon and Preb. of Salis- 
bury, 1875 ; Rector of Fugglestone with Bemerton, 1890, until his death. 
He married, 1860, a daughter of the Rev. James J. Peach. During his 
incumbency at Melksham the Rectory was much enlarged, the restora- 
of the Church was begun, and a new organ provided. The National 
Schools were enlarged, the Mission Church and Schools at Beanacre 
built, and a coffee tavern and mission room in Melksham provided. 
He also took a leading part in many diocesan matters, and both at 
Melksham and at Bemerton he was regarded with much affection and 
esteem by his parishioners. 

Obit, notice, Wiltshire Gazette, Sept. 20th, 1917. 

Alexander Grant Meek, died Sept. 18th, 1917. Buried at Man- 
ningford Bruce. Born Nov. 23rd, 1843, at Hillworth, Devizes. S. of 
Alexander Meek, who married the only child of John Grant, of Man- 
ningford, and inherited his property. Educated at Harrow and Mag- 
dalen Coll., Oxford. He was articled to his father as solicitor, com- 
pleted his legal training in London, and joined the family firm " Meek, 



80 Wilts Obituary. 



Jackson, & Lush," as partner in 1869, and took over several of his 
father's offices on his retirement. He thus became Town Clerk, 
County Treasurer, Clerk and Treasurer to the Visiting Committee of 
the County Asylum, and in 1880 Registrar and High Bailiff of the 
Devizes County Court. In 1890 he retired from business and re- 
linquished all these offices. He became J. P. for the county in 1891, 
was elected an alderman of the County Council 1892, and in 1898 chair- 
man of the Visiting Committee of the Asylum. He was also chairman 
of the Visiting Committee of the Prison. He was a trustee, and since 
the death of Mr. H. E. Medlicott, the treasurer of the Wiltshire Friendly 
Society. He was also one of the chief supporters of the Devizes Cot- 
tage Hospital, towards the enlargement of which he gave £1000 in 
1911, his name being given to the children's ward, to which he was 
subsequently a further benefactor. He also held other important 
voluntary offices in Devizes, and during the war he was a member of 
many committees connected with war work in one way or another. 
His business capacities were shown by his holding directorships in the 
Legal and General Life Assurance Society, and in the Wilts United 
Dairies, Ltd. ; of this latter he was chairman from 1899 to 1915. He 
was an uncompromising Conservative in politics, and in religion a con- 
sistent Churchman. In earlier days he had been a good cricketer. He 
married, 1875, Mary Edith, d. of the Rev. T. W. Dowding, Rector of 
St Peter's, Marlborough, and had two sons and three daughters, Anna 
(died 1894), Muriel, Alexander John (killed in the S. African War,. 
1900), Bridget, and Ernie. 
Long obit, notice, Wiltshire Gazette, Sept. 20th, 1917. 

Sir Richard Burbidge, 1st Baronet, died suddenly May 

31st, 1917, aged 70. Buried at Littleton Park, Shepperton. Born at 
S Wraxall, March, 1847, 4th son of George Bishop Burbidge. He 
married Emily, d. of J. Woodman, of Melksham, by whom he had two 
sons and four daughters. His elder son, Richard Woodman Burbidge, 
b 1872, succeeds to the baronetcy. His wife died 1905, and he married 
secondly, in 1910, Lilian, d. of J. A. Preece, of Bartestree Court, who 
survives him. As a boy he was apprenticed, 1861, for four years, to 
Jonathan Puckridge, also a Wiltshireman, a tea and colonial merchant 
in Oxford Street. At the age of 19 he set up for himself in a wines, 
groceries, and provision shop ; after 14 years of this he became General 
Superintendent of the Army & Navy Auxiliary Stores, and in 1882 be- 
came General Manager of William Whiteley's. Thence he went to the 
West Kensington Stores, and thence in 1891 to Harrod's, where he has 
ever since remained, the number of employees of the firm under his 
management having increased from 200 to 6600. Here he acted as t 
pioneer of the early closing movement, which has since become general. 
His services, which were recognised by the conferring of the baronetcy ( 
upon him 1916, in the way of membership and chairmanship of a great! 
number of public bodies, included the following, says The Times, " He| 
was member of the Munitions Advisory Committee ; of the Executive 






Wilts Obituary. 81 

and General Purposes Committee of the Board of Control of Regi- 
mental Institutes ; of Sir E. Ward's Committee on Voluntary Organ- 
isation ; and of the Home Office Shop Committee. He was chairman 
of the committee on the Royal Aircraft Factory ; a trustee of the 
Crystal Palace ; a member of the Training Sailors Executive Com. 
mittee ; and of the committees of Queen Alexandra's Field Force Fund, 
and the Anglo-Russian Hospital. He was chairman of the Invalid 
Kitchens Executive Committee ; and trustee of the Early Closing 
Association and Provident Society. In addition to being Managing 
Director of Harrods he was chairman of the Hudson Bay Company, of 
which his second son is general manager. He was connected with the 
organisation of the forthcoming Food Economy Exhibition." He was 
a very generous giver, and in 1913 when The Times opened a fund to 
acquire the Crystal Palace, he was the anonymous " Private Citizen " 
who offered to give 10/- for every £1 subscribed by others. He thus 
gave £30,000, and was mainly responsible for the rapid success of the 
fund. In addition he gave £2,500 under his own name " in remem- 
brance of the happy and instructive day he spent at the Crystal Palace 
as an Oxford Street apprentice of 14 on Good Friday, 1862— his first 
holiday in London— and as a mark of gratitude for a successful busi- 
ness career.'' 

Obit, notices, Times, June 2nd ; Wiltshire Gazette, June 7th, 1917. 

Thomas Barker FOX, died Dec. 20th, 1916, aged 82. Buried at 
Gloucester. S. of John James Fox. B. at Devizes, he took a prom- 
inent part in the affairs of the town as a Liberal, a nonconformist, and 
strong temperance advocate, as a Town Councillor in 1870, and in 
other public matters. J. P. for the Borough, 1872. He founded in 
1860 the Wiltshire Sack Hiring Company and was its first Managing 
Director, as he was also of the Severn Ports Warehousing Company. 
In 1877 he left Devizes for Bristol, and of late years had lived at 
Gloucester. 

Obit, notice, Wiltshire Advertiser, Dec. 28th, 1916. 

'honias LavingtOn, died July 12th, 1917, aged 69. Buried at 
Mildenhall. B. 1848, S. of Thomas Lavington, of Poulshot Lodge. 
He farmed at Poulshot ; Whistley House, Potterne ; and Fyfield Farm, 
near Marlborough. In 1881 he took to the business of an auctioneer, 
which he worked up into " probably the largest single-handed business 
of the kind in the West of England." For many years he farmed not 
only Fyfield, but also Poulton, and Court Farm, Collingbourne, each 
of some 2000 acres, and this combination of practical farming on the 
largest scale, with auctioneering and land agency, made Mm a very 
prominent figure in all agricultural matters in Wiltshire. He had lived 
recently at Sigglesthorne, Marlborough. He married a daughter of 
Mr. Rossell, of Sheffield, and left one son, Thomas, and four daughters. 
Long obit, notice, Wiltshire Gazette, July 19th, 1917. 

'he Rev. Walter William Arthur Butt, died July 14th, 

1917. Magd. Coll., Oxon., B.A., 1873 ; M.A., 1875 ; Deacon, 1873 
fpL. XL. — NO. CXXVII. G 



82 Wilts Obituary. 

(Winchester); Priest, 1875 (Sarum) ; Curate of Ch. Ch., Northam 
(Hants), 1873 ; Ordsall, 1873—75 ; Chilmark, 1875—77 ; Donhead St. 
Andrew, 1877-80; Westbury, 1880—81 ; Vicar of Westbury, 1881— 
86 ; Vicar of Minety, 1886—1901 ; Licensed Preacher in Diocese of 
Gloucester, 1901—4; Vicar of Kempsford-with-Whelford, 1904—09; 
when he retired to live at Cheltenham, moving afterwards to Chep- 
stow, where he died. He was a J. P. for Wilts, and a considerable 
botanist. 
Obit, notice, N. Wilts Herald, July 20th, 1917. 

William Rose, died May 5th, 1917, aged 59. Born Dec. 1st, 1857. 
S. of John Rose, of Devizes. Educated at the old Blue Coat School 
in Devizes. He joined his father in business as a butcher, continuing 
therein until his death. He was one of the oldest members of the 
Town Council, was Mayor 1902—3, and was in his earlier days known 
for his athletic powers, and also as a famous breeder and judge of 
Clumber Spaniels. Much respected in Devizes. 

Long obit, notices, Wiltshire Gazette, and Wiltshire Advertiser, May 
10th, 1917. 

Capt. Cyril KllOX EarrOW Mogg". Killed in action Nov. 11th, 
1917, aged 30. S. of Rev. H. H. Mogg, Vicar of Bishops Cannings. 
Educated at Wilkinson's and King's College, Taunton. Went to 
British Columbia. On the outbreak of War enlisted in R.G.A., was 
transferred to Canadian Infantry, 88th Fusiliers, and obtained a com- 
mission. Went to France, June, 1916, and took up trench mortar work. 
Was at the battles of the Somme, and Vimy Ridge. Invalided home, 
returned to command a battalion in the taking of Passchendaele on 
Nov. 10th. One of his brothers was killed some time ago, another 
is severely w T ounded. 

Obit, notice, Wiltshire Gazette, Nov. 22nd, 1917. 

Lieut, J. Gromwell Bush, M.C., Dorset Regt., attached 
R.F.C. Killed in action. Eldest s. of Rev. H. Cromwell Bush, Vicar 
of Seend. B. at Salisbury, 1891, educated at Fritham and St. Edward's 
Schools. Spent some years in Ceylon and India. Commissioned in 
5th Wilts, Sept., 1914. Went to Gallipoli, 1915, was one of the few j 
survivors of that battalion at Suvla Bay, was mentioned in despatches 
and given the M.C. Invalided home, on recovery he went to Egypt as 
A.D.C., and volunteered for the R.F.C. , having received a temporary 
commission in the Dorset' Regiment. Went to France in 1917. He 
had brought down several German machines. 

Obit, notices, Times,Nov. 19th; Wiltshire Gazette, Nov. 22nd, 1917. 

Canon Arthur Barugh Thynne. Died Nov. 2nd, 1917 

Buried at Seend. S. of Frederick Thynne, of Gt. George St., West- 
minster. Born at Wandsworth Lodge, Surrey, 1840. Educated at 
King's College School and Trinity Coll., Cambridge, B.A., 1862 ; M.A., 
1866; Deacon, 1865; Priest 1866 (Winchester). Curate of Northam 
(Hants), 1865 ; Thames Ditton, 1865—69 ; Wilsford( Wilts), 1869—73 ; 



Wilts Obituary. 83 

Vicar of Seend, 1873—1916. Rural Dean of Potterne 1896—1916. 
Canon of Salisbury, 1899 until his death. He was the first Vicar of 
Seend, which had previously been a chapelry of Melksham. During 
his incumbency the Church was restored and brought to its present 
admirable condition. The churchyard, too, which probably occupies the 
finest position, is one of the most beautifully kept in the county. A 
man of much ability and great business capacity, Canon Thynne took a 
prominent part in diocesan matters, more especially as the secretary of 
the Queen Victoria Fund, which he had administered since its foun- 
dation ; indeed it largely owed its success to his efforts. As a Parish 
Priest he was held in high esteem at Seend. Few clergy were 
better known in the Diocese of Salisbury. His shrewd commonsense, 
united as it was with the saving gift of humour, made his advice and 
criticism of much weight in all sorts of meetings and committees. He 
married, 1869, Florence, d. of the Bev. Ed. Lane Sayer, Vicar of 
Pulloxhill, Beds, who with three sons and four daughters survives 
him. 

Long obit, notices, Wiltshire Gazette, Nov. 8th, 1917 ; Salisbury 
Diocesan Gazette, Dec, 1917. 



84 



RECENT WILTSHIRE BOOKS, PAMPHLETS, 
ARTICLES, &c. 

[N.B. — This list does not claim to be in any way exhaustive. The Edit 
appeals to all authors and publishers of pamphlets, books, or views, 
any way connected with the county, to send him copies of their works 
and to editors of papers, and members of the Society generally, to senc 
him copies of articles, views, or portraits, appearing in the newspapers.] 

Highways and Byways in Wiltshire. By Edward 
Hutton, with Illustrations by Nelly Erichsen. 
Macmillan & Co., Limited, St. Martin's Street, 
London. 1917. 

Linen. Post 8vo. pp. xvii. + 437. Ninety-five illustrations from 
pen drawings and folding map. 6s. net. 

This book comes nearer to being a Guide Book to the Ecclesiastical 
and Monastic Architecture of the Middle Ages in Wilts than any other 
yet published. The author, indeed, has an eye for natural scenery and 
descants on it with much sentiment on occasions, but his real love is 
for the Churches and the Monastic houses of the middle ages and the 
Church life which they stood for. For him the Reformation is the end 
of all things good in Wiltshire and in England. Puritans, Protestants, 
Anglicans, with a very few exceptions, such as George Herbert, Richard 
Hooker, the " White JKing," and Sir Christopher Wren, are to him 
Anathema. As for the families who succeeded to the monastic 
properties, the Seymours, the Thynnes, the Hungerfords, the Bayntons, 
and the rest, no words that he can find are bad enough for them. There 
is only one class of men who are more degraded than they, to wit, the 
restorers of Churches within the last sixty years. But if you allow a 
certain discount for the somewhat vituperative expression of his pre- 
ferences, you will find the book well written, pleasant to read, and 
containing a great deal of information, most of it, as the author ac- 
knowledges,taken from the pages of thisMagazine,a,s to the architecture 
of the majority of the old Churches of the county. This is the author's 
strong point ; his history, too, is generally adequate, but on many 
subjects you will find nothing in his pagos He has on the whole a 
good chapter on Roman Wiltshire in which he dwells on the absence 
of towns, and implies that Wiltshire was but sparsely populated in 
Roman times, ignoring the evidence of a great agricultural population 
on the downs as proved by the multitude of sites of " British villages " 
of the Romano-British period. He cares nothing, however, for Pre- 
historic antiquities, and with the exception of Stonehenge, Avebury, 
and the two long barrows of Lugbury and W. Kennett, has nothing to 
say about them, and assumes that^the ordinary reader cares to know 



Recent Wiltshire Books, Pamphlets, Articles, &c. 85 

nothing of them. In his view they do not concern us. Wansdyke he 
mentions once only, incidentally. Of Geology, Botany, Natural History, 
there is not a word. Of the Industries, or Agriculture, of the county, 
past and present, a little, but not much, more. He concentrates 
on the Churches, from the 11th to the 15th century. The Saxons 
he hates, we are not really descended from them, we are Neo- 
lithic, he says, possibly rightly, but he goes on to deny that there 
ever was such a thing as Saxon art or Saxon building, and 
though he duly notes various Churches as "Saxon," i.e., Pre- 
Conqnest, he altogether refuses to believe that the Bradford Church 
was ever built in the 10th century or by Saxons at all. It was built 
by Normans, or rather by an international company of builders in the 
reign of Edward the Confessor, and Manningford Bruce and presumably 
other " Saxon " buildings are in like case. When he is pleased with a 
thing he uses superlative adjectives in its praise ; thus of the effigy of 
William Longespee at Salisbury he writes : " Nothing in the world is 
grander than this exquisite statue, a masterpiece of the thirteenth 
century ; it is worth any trouble to see." Of Salisbury itself he has 
a great deal to say, he takes the city as the centre from which he explores 
the valleys of South Wilts on all sides, treating of almost all their 
Churches in considerable detail. Indeed he pays much more attention 
to the south than to the north of the county. It is as though when he 
had finished the south, he found that he had but scant space or time 
for the north, and had to hurry over it and treat it far more superficially. 
He is interesting on Salisbury Cathedral, and is bold enough to say 
what many have felt, that the very unity of design and rigid perfection 
of the building make it unsatisfying to us. "It is curious that to our 
eyes it is only saved from a certain dullness by the glory of the spire, 
a work not contemporary with the Church, nor even contemplated by 
its builder." " We are aware of its lack of vitality, its mere size and 
complexity add only to its monotony, and were it not for the majestic 
and unifying beauty of the triumphant fourteenth century spire, the 
Cathedral would be so dull as to be disappointing because it would be 
merely an endless repetition without organic life." "Fortunately the 
triumph of the spire hides what would otherwise be obvious aud makes 
of Salisbury the great Church it was meant to be." H e rightly condemns 
the oiling and polishing of the Purbeck marble shafts of the interior as 
"destroying the harmony of the delicious colour scheme, for the tone 
of the marble should be silver grey, and is now a dark and dirty brown 
in amazing contrast to the piers." At Amesbury he enlarges at length 
on the Legends of Ambrosius and the Morte d'Arthur, Guinivere and 
Lancelot, and finds a basis of historical truth in the taking of the body 
of Guinivere by Lancelot to lay it with Arthur at Glastonbury, where 
the Archbishop of Canterbury was in a hermitage, in the fact of the 
capture of Old Sarum by the Saxons in 552, A.D., and the consequent 
imminent danger to the abbey of Amesbury, which had then to be 
deserted. The legend marks the end of one of the three great Roman 
and British Christian shrines. 
As regards the passages from the north aisle to the chancel in 



86 Recent Wiltshire Books, Pamphlets, Articles, Sec. 

Hilmarton, Bremhill, and Great Somerford Churches, he believes 
that they were made in order to bear the sacrament from its own 
altar in the N. aisle to the high altar without passing through the 
nave, but if this was so, why are these passages existing in three almost 
adjoining Churches, found so rarely elsewhere in England ? 

Though he compares the removal of the nave of the Leigh Church 
to a new site with the worst barbarities of the Germans at Rheims, the 
book, written before the War, is in some points not up to date. Thus 
the old House at Upper Upham has now for several years been incor- 
porated into a large new country house with gardens laid out around 
it ; Yatesbury as the site of a great aerodrome can no longer be said to 
be a lonely place ; King John's House at Tollard Royal ceased to be a 
museum on the death of Gen. Pitt Rivers ; and the screen formerly in 
the S. aisle of Great Bedwyn Church was removed without a faculty 
by the Vicar some years ago and is now believed to be at Tottenham 
House. But a more serious matter is the evidence throughout the 
book of a quite curious haste and carelessness, and an apparent absence 
of correction of proofs by the author. Writing of Stockton Church and 
the very curious solid screen wall, he actually quotes a long passage 
describing the destruction of the chancel arch in 1854, which makes 
absolute nonsense of his whole description, for the passage (in Wilts 
Arch. Mag.) refers not to Stockton at all, but to Yatesbury ! Again, 
under Stonehenge he quotes the well known passage from the " Fools 
Bolt" where the " Wander Witt of Wiltshire" was kicked out of doors 
in Rome and bidden to " goe home and see Stonage." And the writer 
adds " I wish all such iEsopical cocks, as slight these admired stones 
. might be handled or rather footed as he was." This passage 
appears thus : " I wish that all such Episcopal cocks as slight these 
admired stones . . . might be handled or rather fooled as he was " ! 
The description of the very remarkable font at Stanton Fitzwarren is 
given under Purton, there being no mention of Stanton Fitzwarren 
Church at all. 

Mistakes in spelling or misprints are constantlyoccurring.Butterworth 
for Butterfield (the architect), Fontrevault for Fontevrault, Hackham 
for Hackpen, Battishorne for Sir John Bettesthorne at Mere, Bonshommes 
for Bonhommes, Newton for Newnton, ChafynGroves for Chafyn Grove 
Knoyle for Knowle in Bedwyn, Eastchurch for Eastcourt in Crudwell, 
March for Narcissus Marsh, Bradford House for Bradfield, Easton 
Place for Easton Piers, Cavenham for Cadenham, Winterton for Win- 
terslow, and Flint plates (for flakes) said to have been found in the 
Silbury evcavations. Of Marlborough in the Civil War the following 
curious statement is made : " The Town was stormed ... by the 
Royalists under Wilmot and John Franklyn the members for the town 
several of the Chief Townsmen and one thousand prisoners were sent to 
Alford." (Oxford). Inscriptions when quoted are sometimes incorrect, 
as for instance those on the Polton Brass at Wanborough and the 
Highworth chalice, whilst Ilbertus de Chaz of the Lacock tombstone 
appears as " Sebertus de Cnut." Little Hinton (instead of Wanborough) 
is said to have a western tower and central spire like Purton. At 



Recent Wiltshire Books, Pamphlets, Articles, &c. 87 

Charlton in Pewsey Vale he places " Charlton Park," where Dryden 
wrote the " Annus Mirabilis " in 1666. And the same statement is 
repeated (correctly) of Charlton, near Malmesbury. The effigies at 
Clyffe Pypard do not " lie by the chancel arch " and are of chalk and 
not wood, as stated here. The " Rudge Cup " was not found at Cunetio, 
the lectern at Durnford is of the 17th and not of the 13th century. 
Unfortunately there are a number of other like inaccuracies. 

The 95 illustrations are well chosen and for the most part quite 
charming. Amongst the most interesting as being of the less hackneyed 
subjects, are : — The Cathedral from the Palace Garden, and from behind 
the Palace ; Ch. of St. Thomas, Salisbury ; Church House, Salisbury ; 
Bemerton Ch. ; Palladian Bridge, Wilton ; Front of Wilton Ho. ; 
Ludgershall Ch. ; Gatehouses (2) at Amesbury ; Durrington Ch. and 
Cross ; Norman Capitals (W. Door), Netheravon ; Gt. Durnford Ch., 
interior; Stockton House; Boyton Manor; Sutton Veny Old Manor 
Ho. ; Knook Manor Ho. ; Shrewton Blind Ho. ; Gateway, Fonthill ; 
Place Ho., Tisbury, Gatehouse and Barn ; Norrington Manor Ho. ; 
Mere Ch., Windows ; Edington Ch., S. side ; St. John's Alley, Devizes ; 
Bishops Cannings Ch,, S. side ; Froxfield Almshouses ; Marlborough 
College ; S. Door, S. Mary's, Marlborough ; Wootton Bassett Town 
Hall ; St. Sampson's Ch., Cricklade ; Old Cross and Schools, St. 
Sampson's Churchyard ; Malmesbury Market Cross ; Corporation 
Almshouses, Malmesbury ; Bradenstoke Priory ; Bromham Ch. (Beau- 
champ Chapel) ; Lacock Tithe Barn ; Lacock Abbey, Tudor Chimneys ; 
John Hall's Almshouses (Entrance Gate), Bradford; Market Cross, 
Castle Combe. 

Noticed, Times Lit. Supplement, Nov. 15th ; Guardian,!) ec. 6th, 1917. 

Report of the Marlborough College Natural History 
Society for the year ending Christmas, 1916. 
No. 63. 

This report is chiefly taken up with the reports of sections containing 
as usual the evidence of good work done. Two plants new to the 
Marlborough list, Juncus obtusiflorus and Carex binervis, are 
reported by C. P. Hurst, and thirty- eight species of Diptera not 
hitherto recorded for Marlborough have been identified by T. W. 
Kirkpatrick. Mr. Hurst also prints the record of new species and 
varieties of Mollusca, which was printed more fully in the last number 
of Wilts Arch. Mag. Photographs of Wolfhall Barn, Wootton Bassett 
Town Hall, and Great Bedwyn Church (2) are reproduced. The most 
generally interesting item, however, is the paper by H. C. Brentnall on 
" Wansdyke in Savernake Forest." Hoare and the six inch Ordnance 
Map show the line of the dyke as crossing the G. W. Railway north of 
Wernham (Hoare's "Ivy's") Farm and running east to a point near 
New Buildings, short of the M. & S. W. J. Railway, where, says Hoare, it 
terminates abruptly. Mr. Brentnall, however, " Found traces of it at 
the shallow cutting on the M. &, S. W. J. Railway, about thirty yards 
south of the accommodation bridge which leads to New Buildings. 



88 Recent Wiltshire Books, Pam}jhlets, Articles, &c. 

The line of it headed directly for the Forest, but east of the railway- 
even these faint traces faded out again. They were confirmed, however, 
by a more easily perceptible length which crosses the pasture opposite 
the end of Great Lodge Bottom. This stretch like a sort of ghost of 
Wansdyke, crosses the whole width of the pasture with a slight but 
highly characteristic bend, making for a point north of the second 
milestone on the Salisbury road. Just before it reaches the Forest 
paling, however, it ceases to be a ghost and becomes the south hedge- 
bank of the cottage garden, which borders the Forest at this point." 
Inside the Forest boundary no trace of the dyke appears, but Mr. 
JBrentnall assumes that it maintained its previous direction, skirting 
the northern edge of Great Lodge Bottom until it met, at right angles, 
the bold length of bank and ditch which crosses the bottom. He 
assumes that this is Wansdyke and that there was a right angled turn 
to the south here. This existing length of ditch terminates abruptly 
at both ends. From this point for 1^ miles no trace of the dyke appears, 
but Mr. Brentnall suggests that the embankment on which Great Lodge 
Drive crosses Thornhill Bottom really covers the dyke. At the extreme 
southern corner of the open ground round the Eight Walks Plantation, 
the course of an old boundary bank running S.E. seems to preserve 
the line of the dyke. It touches the western corner of the next large 
clearing at the point where Twelve O'Clock Drive is intersected by 
another avenue running N.E. and S. W. A few yards west of this were 
unmistakable signs of a nearly obliterated bank crossing the more open 
ground. A quarter of a mile further east at the south corner of the 
second large clearing occurs the length of dyke shown on the Ordnance 
Survey,which, however, extends further at either end than is shown on 
the map. The ditch fades out very gradually on the east. Beyond 
the Grand Avenue both bank and ditch become more marked for a 
while, but are lost again under the paling of the copse until the road 
leading northward: to the " Ruins" is crossed. Inside a young 
plantation of larch and spruce the line of Wansdyke crosses the Roman 
Road to Winchester. For about a furlong beyond the Roman Road, 
the dyke runs strong, marked at intervals by fine old oaks amid the 
young growth. It is lost before it leaves the plantation, however, and 
has not been again identified between that point and the eastern edge 
of the Forest where Hoare describes it as known to him. 

Sheldon Manor . . . Sale by auction by John 
D. Wood & Co. . . . June 12th, 1917. Sale 

particulars. 4to. pp., including title, 16, with folding coloured plan, 
and eight photos, " From within the Forecourt," " Looking Southwards 
from the Porch," ' ' The XHIth Century Porch," " The Lounge Hall," 
11 The Dining Room," " The Jacobean Staircase," " The Library," " The 
William and Mary Drawing Room." "Historical Notes" at the be- 
ginning trace the descent of the manor from William de Beauvilain, 
through Gascelynes and Hungerfords to Sir Richard Kent, 1648, and 
John Norris, 1698. 



Recent Wiltshire Books, Pamphlets, Articles, &c. 89 

Catalogue of Superb Prints, Drawings, Pictures, 
and Armour from the Historical Collections at 
Wilton House, Salisbury, the property of the 
Rt. Hon. the Earl of Pembroke & Montgomery. 
Which will be sold by auction by Messrs. Sotheby, 
Wilkinson, & Hodge ... at their large Galleries, 
34 and 35, New Bond Street, W. 1 .. . . July 
5th and 6th, 9th and 10th, 1917 . . 

Royal 8vo. Wrappers, pp., title, conditions, preface, iv. + 102. 
Price Is. 

" The Superb Prints, Drawings, Pictures, and 

Armour from the Historical Collections at 

Wilton House, Salisbury . . . List of Prices 

and Buyers' names. 1917. Price Three 
Shillings, " 

Royal 8vo. Wrappers, pp. vii. Published after the sale. 
The rare mezzotint :" The Great Executioner," by Prince Rupert 
after Spagnoletto, made i'1300 ; a sheet containing eight original 
drawings by Albert Durer, £1000 ; a drawing of a Pieta by Filippino 
Lippi, £640 ; a drawing by Antonio del Pollaiuolo, £920 ; a drawing 
by Paolo Veronese of Venice crowned by Fame, £1650; a study by 
Correggio for the Nativity at Dresden, £750 ; and two designs by 
Primaticcio, £420. Two great oil paintings were included in the 
Catalogue : Rembrandt's " Portrait of his Mother," which was bought 
in at £1 1,500, and the Judith and Holof ernes by Mantegna, which was 
privately sold for a sum not specified, but said to be far in excess of 
the reserve, 

The objects which excited the greatest amount of interest, however, 
were the two suits of armour which stood in the hall of Wilton House. 
" It may be questioned whether any suits of armour in the hands of 
other private owners can rival their combination of historic interest with 
beauty of design and craftsmanship ; none perhaps can show an un- 
broken descent in the same house and in the same family for over 350 
years." They are thus described in the Catalogue : — 
" Lot 540. The armour of Anne de Montmorency, 1492 — 1567, Con- 
stable of France, worn by him when he was wounded and taken 
prisoner at the battle of St. Quentin, August 10, 1557, fought 
between the French under his own command and the Imperialists 
under the Duke of Savoy, the English Contingent of the Imperial 
army being led during the Campaign by William Herbert, 1501 — 
1570, first Earl of Pembroke of the second creation. The armour 
has been preserved at Wilton House since 1557. Exhibited at the 
Tudor Exhibition, 1890. A Three Quarter Suit of large size and 
beautiful workmanship ; all the borders are turned over with roped 
edges, russet surface ; with bands and borders of gilded and deeply 



90 Recent Wiltshire Books, Pamphlets, Articles, &c. 

engraved ornament. Though no armourer's mark is visible on any 
of the pieces, the suit is undoubtedly Italian work." [A detailed 
description follows of each piece of the suit, with a note that " there 
never were any Greaves to this suit, as was often the case in those 
days with suits meant for campaigning."] 
" Lot 541. The armour of Louis de Bourbon, Due de Montpensier, 
1513—82, taken prisoner with Anne de Montmorency at the battle 
of St. Quentin, 1557. Exhibited at the Tudor Exhibition, 1890. 
A Full Suit reaching to the ankles ; russet surface, turned over 
boldly roped edges ; vertical bands of gilded engraving. Though 
no armourer's mark is visible, the suit is certainly of Italian work- 
manship." [A full description of each piece of the suit follows.] 
It was said in the newspapers that the late Due d' Aumale many 
years ago offered £30,000 for these two suits in the hope of restoring 
them to France. At the sale £14,500 was bid for the first and £10,500 
for the second — sums said in each case to be £500 under the reserved 
price. The armour was therefore not sold. Illustrations of it appeared 
in the Connoisseur, The Daily Mirror^ July 12th, 1917, and elsewhere. 
The Daily Telegraph, May 23rd, 1917, contained an article " Pembroke 
armour, Wilton Treasures for Sale," describing the armour, &c. 

The Burlington Magazine, July, 19 17, contained an article by Charles 
ffoulkes disputing the authenticity of the two suits of armour, and 
contending that both are of later date than the Battle of St. Quentin. 
In reply the Earl of Pembroke printed a letter of protest in the ad- 
vertisement columns of the Morning Post, vigorously defending the 
traditional pedigree of the suits and citing the opinions of Earl Dillon, 
Mr. Starkie Gardiner, Baron de Cosson, and the late Due D'Aumale. 
From the prices bid it was clear that the pedigree of the suits was not 
really doubted by the experts at the sale. The total for the four days' 
sale (not including the Mantegna) was £52,819 8s. 6d. A curious 
circumstance attaches to the sheet of drawings by Albert Durer,which 
sold for £1,000. The existence of this was unknown when the collection 
was sent to Sotheby's as it was covered by an engraving pasted over it, 
and was only discovered in the process of making the catalogue. A 
good account of the sale is given in the Wiltshire Gazette, July 12th, 1917. 

[Bradenstoke Abbey ♦ ] " By direction of Sir Prior Goldney, Bart., 
C.V.O., G.B. . . . Particulars, Views, and Plan of the Historical 
Estate known as Bradenstoke, extending to 481 acres . . . including 
the interesting Bradenstoke Abbey, dating back to the year 1142. Also 
the Lordship of the Manor and Advowson. To be offered by Auction 
... by Messrs. Knight, Frank, and Rutley. ... 20, Hanover 
Square . . . Oct. 30th, 1917." 

Folio. Stiff paper cover. 13in. X 8jin. pp., including title, 19. 
Small reproduction of Buck's view of the abbey, and two good photo 
plates, The Abbey, The Abbey Crypt, and Bradenstoke Village. Three 
pp. (2 to 4) contain an Historical Introduction, extracted from Aubrey 
and Jackson's " Wiltshire Collections." Coloured folding plan. 



Recent Wiltshire Books, Pamphlets, Articles, &c. 91 

[Two photos of the " Abbey : ' and one of the village also appeared in 
Country Life Supplement, Sept. 22nd, and Oct. 13th, 1917.] 

The property was bought as a whole for £15,500 by Baron F. de 
Tuyll, who intends to restore the building as a residence. 

Book of Occasional Offices authorised for use in 
the Diocese of Salisbury. Salisbury : Brown & 
Co. London : A. K,. Mowbray & Co., Ltd. 28, 
Margaret Street, W, 1917. 

Cloth. 8vo. . pp viii. + 204. Contains 39 Forms of Service for 
use on special occasions. Canon Chr. Wordsworth was the chairman 
of the committee by whom the book was drawn up. 

An Admiral's Wife in the making. 1860—1903. 
By Lady Foore, author of " Kecollections of an 
Admiral's Wife," with Portraits. London : 
Smith, Elder, & Co., 15, Waterloo Place. 1917. 

Cloth. 8^in. x 5^in. pp., including title, xiii. + 374. Photo 
portraits of Lady Poore and Commander Richard Poore. 

The book is divided into four parts : "A. Dean's Daughter," 1860—66; 
"A Bishop's Daughter," 1866-85 ; (Lady Poore's father was Dean of 
the Chapel Royal, Dublin, and afterwards Bishop of Limerick) ; " A 
Commander's Wife," 1885—90; "A Captain's Wife," 1890— 1903. It 
is a very pleasantly und amusingly written account of the earlier portion 
of the life of the authoress, from her childhood in Ireland upwards, 
and as a sailor's wife in many lands. It is really the first volume of the 
reminiscences, of which the previously published " Recollections of an 
Admiral's Wife " form the second. The latter book has already given 
us the account of Sir Richard and Lady Poore's life from his promotion 
to Rear Admiral in 1903 down to their present life at '" Winsley Corner." 

Phe Manuscript of William Dunche, toeing the Book 
of the New Ordinary of the King's most Honour- 
able Household, anno 31 Henry YII a Transcripts 
with Notes by A. Cr. W. Murray, Ml, and Eustace 
P. Bosanquet. Reprinted for private circulation, 
Exeter, William Pollard & Co., Ltd., 1914. 

Royal 8 vo, Reprinted from The Genealogist, N.S. Vols. xxix. and 
xxx. Thirty copies printed. Title, contents, &c, pp. 6 unnumbered 
+ 74 including Index of Names. 

William Dunche, of Little Wittenham, Berks, was appointed Auditor 
of the Mint in 1546. Avebury Priory (by a curious slip here said to be 
in Berks) was granted to him in 1556. He settled at Little Wittenham 
near Wallingford, which he represented in Parliament, in 1562, died 
May 11th, 1597, and was buried in Little Wittenham Church. An 
abstract of his will is here printed, in which he speaks of " my Manor 
of Eastropp, co. Wilts." 



92 Recent Wiltshire Books, Pamphlets, Articles, &c. 

History. Wilton, Wilts, near Salisbury. Published 
by Jukes, Wilton. 

Pamphlet. Cr. 8vo. pp.16. Price 6 d. [1917.] 

This little pamphlet has been published to meet the wishes of 
Australian soldiers quartered in the neighbourhood for some souvenir 
to send home. Four pages are given to a sketch of the history of the 
place and the remaining space to some description of the Church, 
House, Carpet Factory, and other objects of interest. Beyond one 
small tailpiece of the Cathedral there are no illustrations. The letter- 
press would have been much improved by more careful revision for the 
press, by which misprints and slips in grammar which now disfigure it 
might have been avoided 



[Erratum.] Stonehenge, To-day and Yesterday. 
By Frank Stevens. 

In the notice of this book in the last Magazine, vol. xxxix., p. 517, 
the accuracy of Mr. Heywood Sumner's drawing of Stonehenge, which 
shows the bank inside the ditch, is impugned. This is an error, Mr. 
Heywood Sumner is right, the bank at Stonehenge, unlike that at 
Avebury, is inside the ditch. 



93 



ADDITIONS TO MUSEUM AND LIBRARY. 
Museum. 

Presented by Capt. and J Mrs. B. H. Cunnington, with the consent of the 
War Office : The whole of the objects found during their 
excavation of Lidbury Camp in 1914. 

„ „ Rev. E. H. Goddard : A ! collection of Coral Rag and Kim- 

meridge Clay Fossils from Hilmarton : and Chalk Marl 
Fossils from Clyffe, &c. 

,, ,, Mr. J. W. Brooke : Two broken polished Flint Celts, one 

Fabricator, and four Scrapers, from Avebury. 

„ „ Mr. Percy Farrer ; Flint Arrowhead from Tidworth. Flint 

Flakes and rude implement like those found at Stonehenge, 
found in the bank and ditch of the Cursus when cut 
through for drainage works, 1917. 

„ ,, Mrs. E. H. Goddard: Wedgwood Matchbox, with relief of 

Stonehenge on cover. 



Library. 

'resented by Mrs. E. H. Goddard : " The Army Lists of the Roundheads 
and Cavaliers." Edited by Ed. Peacock. 1863. 

„ „ Mr. Edward Slow : " History, Wilton, Wilts, published by 

Jukes, Wilton." 1917. 

„ „ The Author, (Mr. Eustace F. Bosanquet) :— " English 

Printed Almanacks and Prognostications." 1917. 4to. 
" The Manuscript of William Dunche, being the Book of 
the New Ordinary of the King's most Honourable House- 
hold,® Anno 31. Henry VIII. 1914." 

„ „ Mrs. Grant Meek : Steward's accounts of Bear Club 

Charity, 1765—1874. Reports of Charities. 

„ „ Rev. C. V. Goddard : Salisbury Journal for 1917. 

, „ The Proprietor : Wiltshire Gazette, 1917. 

„ „ The Proprietor : Wiltshire Advertiser, 1917. 

„ „ The Proprietor : Wiltshire Times, 1917 '. 

„ „ The Author, Miss H. a'C. Penruddocke : Newspaper 
article. 

„ „ Mr. J. J. Slade : 12 Sale Catalogues of Wiltshire properties. 



94 Additions to Museum and Library. 

Presented by Rev. E. H. Goddard : 63 large measured Architectural 
Water Colour Drawings of Wiltshire Churches by Owen 
B. Carter, architect, 1847—1850. Three Estate Sale Cat- 
alogues. Transactions of the N. Wilts Field & Camera 
Club, Vols. I.— III., 1908-1912. 

„ „ The Authoress (Lady Poore) : " An Admiral's Wife in the 

Making." 1917. 

„ Mr. A. W. Marks : 6 Old Deeds relating to Wootton 

Bassett. 

„ „ Mr. W, A. Bones : 9 Wilts Illustrations. 

„ „ Capt. B. H. Cunnington : Wilts Sale Catalogues. 

„ „ Mr. J. D. Crossfield : 13 back numbers of Wiltshire 

Archaeological Magazine, and 5 of Inquisitiones Post 
Mortem. 

„ „ The Author (Mr. E. H. Stone) : " Devizes Castle, its History 

and Romance." Prospectus and Extracts. 1917. 

„ „ Mr. A. Schomberg : 12 vols, of The Ancestor (all published). 

56 sermons preached at Devizes by Mr. J. P. Wiles. 
" Letters concerning the Love of God," by John Norris, 
1695. " A Relation of the Death of the Primitive Perse- 
cutors, translated by Gilbert Burnett," 1687. "The 
Mystery of the Marriage Song," &c, by W. Troughton, 
1656. " Two Monuments," by A. Schomberg. " A Roll 
of Arms, 1673," by A. Schomberg. 

„ „ The Publishers, Messrs. Macmillan : " Highways and 

Byways in Wiltshire," by Edward Hutton. 1917. 




a80CU95B 



C. H. Woodward, Printer and Publisher, Exchange Buildings, Station Road, Devizes j 



THE SOCIETY'S PUBLICATIONS (Continued), 

STONEHENGE AND ITS BARROWS, by W. Long, Nos. 46-47 of the 
Magazine in separate wrapper, 7s. 6d. This still remains the best and most 
reliable account of Stonehenge and its Earthworks. 

WILTSHIRE— The TOPOGRAPHICAL COLLECTIONS OF JOHN 
AUBREY, F.R.S., A.D. 1659-1670. Corrected and enlarged by the Rev. 
Canon J. E. Jackson, M.A., F.S.A. 4to, Cloth, pp. 491, with 46 plates. 
Price £2 10s. 

WILTSHIRE INQUISITIONES POST MORTEM. CHARLES I. 8vo, 
pp. vii. + 501. 1901. With full index. In 8 parts, as issued. Price 13s. 

DITTO. IN THE REIGNS OF HEN. III., ED. I., and ED. II. 8vo, 
pp. xv., 505. In parts as issued. Price 13s. 

DITTO. FROM THE REIGN OF ED. III. 8vo., pp. 402. In six 

parts as issued. Price 13s. 

A BIBLIOGRAPHY of the GREAT STONE MONUMENTS of 
WILTSHIRE, STONEHENGE and AVEBURY, with other references, 
by W. Jerome Harrison, F.G.S., pp. 169, with 4 illustrations. No. 89, Dec, 
1901, of the Magazine. Price 5s. 6d. Contains particulars as to 947 books, 
papers, &c, by 732 authors, 

THE TROPENELL CARTULARY. An important work in 2 vols., 8vo, 
pp. 927, containing a great number of deeds connected with property in many 
Wiltshire Parishes of the 14th and 15th centuries. Only 150 copies were 
printed, of which a few are left. Price to members, £1 10s., and to non- 
members, £% 



WILTSHIRE MAMMALS, BIRDS, & REPTILES. 

Mil. G. B. Hony, 4, Beaufort Koad, Clifton, Bristol, will be 
greatly obliged if members would kindly send him notice of 
the occurrence of any rare birds within the borders of the 
County, or of the occurrence of unusual mammals or reptiles. 



BOOKBINDING. 

Books carefully Bound to pattern. 

This department now greatly enlarged. 

Wilts Archaeological Magazine bound to match previous volumes-. 

We have several back numbers to make up sets. 

C. H. WOODWARD, Printer and Publisher, 

Exchange Buildings, Station Road, Devizes 



THE 

North Wilts Museum and 
LIBRARY AT DEVIZES. 



In answer to the appeal made in 1905, annual subscriptions 
varying from £2 to 5s., to the amount of about £32 a year for this 
purpose have been given by about seventy Members of the Society 
and the fund thus set on foot has enabled the Committee already 
to add much to the efficiency of the Library and Museum. 

It is very desirable that this fund should be raised to at least 
£50 a year, in qrder that the General Fund of the Society may 
be released to a large extent from the cost of the Museum, and 
set free for the other purposes of the Society. 

Subscriptions of 5s. a year, or upwards, are asked for, and 
should be sent either to Mr. D. Owen, Bank Chambers, Devizes, 
or Eev. E. H. Goddard, Clyffe Vicarage, Swindon. 

The Committee appeal to Members of the Society and others 
to secure any 

Objects of Antiquity, 

AND 

Specimens of unusual Birds, 
Butterflies, or Moths, 

found in the County of Wilts and to forward them to the 
Hon. Curator, Mr. B. H. Cunnington, Devizes; 

Whilst Old Deeds, Modern Pamphlets, Articles, 

Portraits, Illustrations from recent Magazines 

or Papers bearing in any way on the County, 

and Sale Particulars of Wiltshire Properties, 

will be most gratefully received for the Library by the EEV. 
E. H. Goddard, Clyffe Vicarage, Swindon, Hon. Librarian. 

C. H. WOODWARD, MACHINE PRINTER, DEVIZES. 



1 M00 



No. CXXVIII. 



JUNE., 1918. 



Vol. XL. 



THE 



WILTSHIRE 

Archaeological & Natural History 

MAGAZINE, 

Published under the Direction of the 

SOCIETY FOEMED IN THAT COUNTY, 
A. D. 18 5 3. 



EDITED BY 

REV. E. H. GODDARD, Clyffe Vicarage, Swindon. 




DEVIZES : 

Printed and sold for the Society by C. H. Woodward, 

Exchange Buildings, Station Road. 



Price os. 6d. Members, Gratis. 



NOTICE TO MEMBERS. 
TAKE NOTICE, that a copious Index for the preceding eight 
volumes of the Magazine will be found at the end of Vols. 
viii, xvi., xxiv., and xxxii. The subsequent Volumes are 
each indexed separately. 

Members who have not paid their Subscriptions to the Society for 
the current year, are requested to remit the same forthwith to 
the Financial Secretary, Mr. David Owen, Bank Chambers, 
Devizes, to whom also all communications as to the supply 
of Magazines should be addressed. 

The Annual Subscription to the Society is 10/6, witli an entrance 
fee of 10/6. The Composition for Life Membership is £10 10s. 

The Numbers of this Magazine will be delivered gratis, as issued, 
to Members who are not in arrear of their Annual Subscrip- 
tions, but in accordance with Byelaw No. 8 "The Financial 
Secretary shall give notice to Members in arrear, and the 
Society's publications will not be forwarded to Members whose 
Subscriptions shall remain unpaid after such notice." 

All other communications to be addressed to the Honorary Secre 
tary: the Kev. E. H. Goddard, Clyffe Vicarage, Swindon. 



THE SOCIETY'S PUBLICATIONS. 

To be obtained of Mr. D. OWEN, Bank Chambers, Devizes 

THE BRITISH AND ROMAN ANTIQUITIES OF THE NORTH 
WILTSHIRE DOWNS, by the Rev. A. 0. Smith, M.A. One Volume, A&i 
4fco, 248 pp., 17 large Maps, and 110 Woodcuts, Extra Cloth. Price £2 2s 
One copy offered to each Member of the Society at £1 1 Is. 6d. 

THE FLOWERING PLANTS OF WILTSHIRE. One Volume, 8vo 
504 pp., with Map, Cloth. By the Rev. T. A. Preston, M.A. Price to the 
Public, 16s. ; but one copy offered to every Member of the Society at half-price 

CATALOGUE of the STOURHEAD COLLECTION of ANTIQUITIE 
in the SOCIETY'S MUSEUM, with 175 Illustrations. Part I. Price Is. 6d 

CATALOGUE of ANTIQUITIES in the SOCIETY'S MUSEUM 
Part II. 1911. Fully illustrated. Price 2s, 

CATALOGUE of the SOCIETY'S LIBRARY at the MUSEUM 
Price Is. APPENDIX No. I., II., and III., 3d. each. 

CATALOGUE of DRAWINGS, PRINTS, and Maps, in the SOCIETY'^ 
LIBRARY at the MUSEUM. Price Is. 6d. 

CATALOGUE of WILTSHIRE TRADE TOKENS in the SOCIETY 
COLLECTION. Price 6d. 

BACK NUMBERS of the MAGAZINE. Price to the Public, 5s. 6d. an 
3s. 6d. (except in the case of a few numbers, the price of which is rais 
Members are allowed a reduction of 25 per cent, from these prices. 



WILTSHIRE 
Archaeological & Natural History 

MAGAZINE. 



No. CXXV1II. JUNE, 1918. Vol. XL. 



Contents. 



PAGE. 



Durrington Walls, or Long Walls : By P. Farrer 95—103 

The Church of S. Michael, Brink worth, Wilts : By C .E. 

Ponting, F.S.A 104—109 

Customs of the Manor of Purton (cir. 1597): Transcribed 

by Canon F. H. Manley 110—118 

Perambulation of Purton, 1733 : Transcribed by Mrs. T. 

Story Maskelyne 119—128 

Wiltshire Newspapers — Past and Present. Part II. : By 

J. J. Slade 129—141 

The Lavington Manual (Manuale Ad Usum Sarum) MS. 

XIII, XIV., XV. Centuries: By Eustace F. Bosanquet ... 142—147 

The Buckler Collection of Wiltshire Drawings 148—190 

Drawings of Wiltshire Churches : By O. B. Carter, 1847—50 190—191 

Wiltshire Deeds Recently Acquired ... 192 

Wilts Obituary 193—202 

Additions to Library 202 — 203 

Accounts of the Society for the Year 1917 204—207 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 

Durrington Walls, Ground Plan 96 

Durrington Walls, Sections 97 

Sketch Plan of The Boundaries of Purton Parish 122 

The Lavington Manuale 142 

Dkvizes:— C. H. Woodward, Exchange Buildings, Station Road. 



THE 



WILTSHIRE MAGAZINE 



" MULTOEUM MANIBUS GRANDE LEVATUR ONUS." — Ovid. 

No. CXXVIII. JUNE, 1918. Vol. XL. 

DURRINGTON WALLS, ok LONG WALLS. 

By P. Farrer. 

The owners are the War Department, Winchester College, 
Admiral Sir R. Poore, Bart., and the work is shown on the 
Ordnance Survey 25 inch, sheets 54, 11, and 12. 

This earthwork lies about 1200 yards south-west of Durrington 
Church and is intersected by the road from Amesbury to Devizes, 
as Colt Hoare shows, though further north this road only dates 
from the early nineteenth century. It is sited on the western 
slope of the valley of the River Avon reaching almost to the 
riverbank, is commanded by higher ground to the north-west and 
south, and is about half-way between the Packway and the present 
London Road. The Packway is now metalled, but till 1910 was 
only a track, if an important one, that crosses the river at Bulford 
(which village claimed in the early part of the seventeenth century 
to stand on the London Road), about 1500 yards above the earth- 
work. The present London Road follows pretty closely one of the 
oldest lines taken by traffic in the South of England, which can be 
traced from Marazion to Dover, though there is a divergence at 
Amesbury. It seems probable that the old place of crossing is 
indicated by the name Ratfyn, if this may be translated " The 
White Ford," Rat being equivalent to Ret and fyn to Gwyn or 
Vin, about 1000 yards down stream from the Walls. 

The general shape of the work may be called circular, but there 
are straight lengths in the perimeter, which is incomplete as re- 
gards bank or scarp on the east side, where there is a gap of about 

VOL XL. — NO. CXXVIII. G 



96 Durrington Walls, or Long Walls. 

100 yards between the eastern and southern banks. This gap was 
originally filled by a ditch, an opening about 30 feet wide being 
left therein as an entrance just beyond the present end of the 
eastern bank. The line of the ditch was clearly visible in the 
young corn in April, 1917, and in August of the same year was 
equally plainly shown by the longer darker stubble ; it follows an 
easy curve and reaches the south scarp about 70 yards west of the 
Amesbury Road. I think it continued westwards along the toe 
of the scarp, for there is a well-defined depression here, but it is 
hard to decide how much is ditch and how much the effect of 
traffic, probably agricultural and modern. 

The south scarp extends eastwards beyond the line of the eastern 
bank for about 30 yards and appears to be continued to the river 
bank by a low ditched mound, but this must be modern, for the 
line is not true with that of the south scarp, while the bank would 
have obstructed the track along the riverside, shown by Colt Hoare 
in his map of the Amesbury section but now only traceable south j 
of Durrington Walls in certain states of cultivation. The river 
bank here is steep and opposite the work the water level is normally 
some 20 feet below the crest of the bank. 

The east side is no doubt a bank, formed by heaping up the spoil 
from a wide ditch on the inner or area side of the bank, which has 
been much spread and degraded by cultivation, but the remaining 
portions of the perimeter are scarps varying much in height and 
formed by digging out a portion of the area and depositing the 
spoil on the top of the outer slope of the excavation. As a guide 
to the amount of the excavation I would suggest that a line be 
drawn some 60 feet away from and parallel to the present toe of 
the scarp. I am sure that the whole of the perimeter is artificial 
and not partly natural as Colt Hoare suggests. The area is now, 
1917, cultivated, as is the land to the east and north, and as was 
till recently the land to the west. That to the south appears to 
have been cultivated for very many years. 

The only certain entrance is the 30 feet gap in the ditch already 
mentioned, but it seems possible that foot and perhaps pack traffic 
entered and left at the north-west and south-west corners, where 
the scarps are low. 




n 



By P. Farrer. 97 

The work for this locality is anomalous, for it may be described 
as formed not on but below the natural surface to a large extent, 
that is to say not by digging a ditch and heaping up the soil into 
a bank, but by excavating on three sides at least a triangular piece 
of ground and then spreading the soil outwards on the top of the 
outer slope of the excavation. The east bank, however, seems 
normally formed, though the ditch is on the area side. That the 
west scarp was constructed as I have stated is proved by the change 
of slope shown in Section C— D and by Section E — F, and I think 
it is quite safe to assume that the other northern and southern 
sides were produced in the same way. The labour expended 
must have been colossal, for a recent cutting in the toe of the 
western scarp showed a height of about 6ft. 6in. of virgin 
chalk, while the change of slope, that certainly marks the ap- 
proximate line of the original surface, occurs about 8ft. above the 
present level of the area. I think it is probable that this has been 
lowered somewhat by continuous cultivation, and that the bank 
may have been heightened by washings from the higher ground to 
the westward, but even so the amount of excavation is large and 
the very remarkable result has been obtained that the whole of 
the area is commanded from the perimeter. The marked advantage 
i of protection from the westerly winds that scourge this country 
^results, but, on consideration of other sites, this advantage appears 
I to have been neglected by our predecessors. It is of course the 
I fact that many of the "villages" are so sited as to be somewhat 
sheltered by higher ground to the west, but there is nothing on 
I ttie Plain analogous to Durrington Walls. The proximity to water 
is quite another matter, for there is no doubt that even in Eoman 
times water was much more abundant on the surface of the Plain 
than is now the case. One might suppose that the work was 
constructed in degenerate days when folk no longer welcomed the 
wild north-wester, were it not that Colt Hoare says, page 169 et 
feq. vol. i. Ancient Wilts, that he picked up " a great deal of pottery 
'within the area," and later indicates his belief that the ware was 
inre-Koman and early. This statement has been questioned for no 
'very obvious reason, since that great man is admittedly reliable as 

G 2 



98 Durrington Walls, or Long Walls. 

to facts, if our enquiries have shown that some of his deductions 
are wrong. Section E — F shows, I think, that the work is later 
than the Bronze Age, though further excavation may prove that 
it dates from the latter part of this era. Such finds of pottery as 
I have made have been, with one exception, mediaeval or modern, 
but at the point marked Z on plan I found a small piece of Late 
Celtic pottery dug out of the scarp by a friendly rabbit. The 
evidence is poor, but the fragment probably came from well within 
the scarp and it appears probable that most of if not all the larger 
Camps and Ditches on the Plain date from the Iron Age at earliest. 

Whatever the date (suggestions have been made that the work is 
mediaeval), it is difficult to offer adequate explanation of the form 
taken and of the unusual expenditure of labour, profitless from 
the point of view of defensibility ; and I put forward for criticism 
two suggestions based on assumptions and incline to think that j 
the second may adumbrate the truth. 

The first theory assumes that Stonehenge was a temple and that 
the earthwork was constructed while worship took place there. If 
Stonehenge were erected for religious purposes, there must have 1 
been a "college" of priests for the service, including men of the! 
highest rank, who must have dwelt relatively close. It is hard to 
believe that the windswept sites near the temple would have! 
satisfied a section of the community inclined to consider creature j 
comforts. There is, moreover, no evidence to be found of a settle- j 
ment close to the stones, though it is possible that here, as else-ll 
where, the turf covers all relics, Stonehenge is but If miles awayB 
from Durrington Walls and either branch of the so-called "Via!/ 
Sacra" might have connected the two places. I must admit thatB 
no trace of such a track remains, but a hundred odd years ago 
Colt Hoare wrote of long-continued cultivation. The temple itself] 
must have been hypsethral and therefore uninhabitable, while the 
service must have required a large number of priests. This 
suggestion that, the " Walls " was the priests' Close might explain 
the indefensibility, for the sacredness and social power of the 
priestly caste would be their best protection. I may say that the 
evidence as to the early. date of Stonehenge appears to me rathe] 



By P. Farrer. 99 

inadequate, and that the calculations of Sir N. Lockyer seem very 
unconvincing, so that the evidence provided by Section E — F 
presents to me no difficulty, the section showing as it does that it 
is possible that Durrington Walls were made late in the Bronze 
Age. If, however, the date be Late Celtic, it appears possible that 
here may have been a dwelling place of the mysterious Druids, 
whose inviolability again would account for the form of the work. 

The other suggestion is that here, close to the principal east and 
west route in the South of England, might well be found a large 
open air caravanserai. The fords must have been impassable for 
days if not for weeks in times of flood, and a halting place for 
travellers and transport would have been needed. It is easy to 
imagine that the inhabitants of Vespasian's Camp would object 
strongly to the continued presence of a number of strangers. I do 
not know the line of the road well enough to suggest other similar 
halting places, though at Balksbury, near Andover, at a day's stage 
or twelve miles distant, can be found points of resemblance. Here, 
at any rate, travellers would have found modified shelter from the 
weather and an inexhaustible supply of water. The labour ex- 
pended seems to preclude the possibility of this having been no 
more than a cattle kraal. 

To return to facts: the area enclosed is about 35 acres and the 
soil is a fairly deep light loam. The outlook, except towards the 
north-east and east, is much restricted, while Sidbury and Ves- 
pasian's Camp are the only large earthworks visible. The nearest 
barrow is a large disc barrow, not shown by the Survey but 
perfectly clearly seen, though much degraded by cultivation, 
which lies about 80 yards south of the earthwork. A little further 
south is the remarkable barrow, "like three barrows rising from 
one base but certainly a long barrow, mentioned by Colt Hoare, 
This, too, is rapidly losing shape from the effects of ploughing. 

The scarps do not appear to have been crowned by banks, for 
the only bank now visible is of the slightest and is probably a 
modern product of cultivation. I found evidence in various holes 
dug for electric light poles that the ground beyond the western 
scarp had been disturbed, while Mr. W. H. Beswick, who was in 



100 Durrington Walls, or Long Walls. 

charge of the camp drainage and was most helpful and sympathetic, 
told me that for a distance of 40 yards westwards from the point 
where Section C — D was taken the surface was formed of made 
ground tapering from east to west. The evidence given by E — F 
is complete and convincing and the history of this section may be 
given at length. Mr. Beswick telephoned to say that, in digging 
a trench, a skeleton had been found but that the workman, thinking 
the skull was a basin, had put his pick through it. On proceeding 
thither to investigate, I found that the pick had been put through 
the skull most effectually, but that the fragments had been col- 
lected, while on examination of the trench I found other human 
bones, obviously arranged in non-natural relations and showing 
old fractures. The skull also appeared to have been broken before 
the intelligent working man came along. I was unable to find all 
the pieces but collected enough to join up and to show that 
it was a typical Bronze Age skull with very heavy lower jaw and 
strong superciliary ridges, while the tibia showed the marked 
points of muscular attachment that are generally found in skele- 
tons of this age. 

Examination of the rest of the trench showed that the scarp had 
been formed by cutting and filling, Absolute proof of the artificial 
nature of the upper strata was given by the presence, at the west 
end of the trench and on the original surface, of a layer of 
charcoal, containing calcined bones, one at least human, and flints. 
In the layer was a fragment of pottery pronounced by Mrs. 
Cunnington and by Dr. Blackmore to be part of a Bronze Age 
beaker. Each face was reddish-brown, the outside ornamented 
with elongated dots in groups set chequerwise and separated by 
small incised bands. The core was black, composed of fine stuff 
and the whole was about \ inch thick. Below the charcoal lay 
the quite normal depth of 6 inches of soil that rested on the un- 
disturbed chalk. My two companions were men experienced in 
excavation, who agreed that these were the original untouched sur- 
face and subsoil. Above the charcoal, which reached a maximum 
of 4 inches in thickness, was spread a layer of chalk lumps averaging 
about 3 inches either way, the thickness whereof diminished in 



By P. Farrer. 101 

proportion to the distance from the crest of the scarp, in other 
words tapered from east to west, but the vanishing point was not 
exposed. Above the lumps lay the present surface soil, here in- 
cluding the grass, about 15 inches deep and very pale, though it 
was under cultivation within the last fifteen years. The depth 
may have been increased by washings from the higher land to the 
westward; the colour made us think that the soil must contain a 
very large proportion of broken down chalk. 

The charcoal layer was exposed for about 7 feet from east, where 
it began, to west, where the end was not reached, and was visible 
on both sides of the soakpit, that is to say, for a width of about 
4 feet, but on neither side was the end exposed. Skull and bones 
were well above the level of the charcoal and lay in the layer of 
chalk lumps. 1 should suppose that they had been reinterred 
after discovery during the excavation of Durrington Walls; there 
certainly was no sign of disturbance in the overlying strata. 
Further excavation was most desirable but I had not time, men, 
or authority to enable me to dig. The human bone showing traces 
of fire suggests, perhaps, that here was the site of a funeral pyre, 
though the meaning may be sinister. 

The presence of the pottery shows that Durrington Walls must 

| have been constructed after the date when this was deposited, but 

I whether only later in the Bronze Age or in the subsequent ages 

I excavation alone can show. 1 cannot think it later than pre-Roman, 

and the fragment of Late Celtic pottery found seems to me to 

suggest this period as the probable date. 

Leaving this anomalous work, 1 may say that there is a great 
i deal of Romano- British pottery visible about 100 yards south-west 
i of the Walls, with many pits and trenches. This was evidently the 
i site of a considerable settlement and the pottery extends for some 
i distance southwards, to a point at least 150 yards from the S.W. 
- corner of the work. 

I also found four fragments of ware of the same period close to, 
i and apparently dug by a rabbit from underneath the sarsen that 
! lies about 350 yards from the earthwork. Presumably this is the 
I stone mentioned by Colt Hoare in Ancient. Wilts, Vol. I., p. 172, 



102 Durrington Walls, or Long Walls. 

but he uses the vague phrase "above Durrington Walls," From 
the pottery and from the pale and chalky nature of the soil thrown 
up I should judge that here was the site of an interment. Rabbits 
must have a reasonable depth of soft stuff for their workings, and 
it is very rare in this locality to find undisturbed chalk sufficiently 
friable to permit of rabbits burrowing therein, while still more 
rarely does enough soil overlie the chalk for rabbit buries. It has 
been suggested that this was a stone intended for Stonehenge, but 
dropped on the way, a ridiculous idea, for who would bring a stone 
about 6 feet x 5 feet X 3 feet 6 inches, weighing at least 5 tons, 
to within two miles of their destination and then leave it ? Of 
course the architect in charge may have condemned the stone in 
transit, and the contractor simply dumped it where it was stopped. 
Doubtless the theory " lost in transit " may apply to the larger 
stone that lies in the river, about 1000 yards up stream from 
Durrington Walls, but it seems quite inapplicable to the stone 
under consideration or to that on Bui ford Hill, Another ap- 
parently futile suggestion is that these stones were employed as 
pointers for the setting out of Stonehenge : trig : points so to speak : 
but I can assert that they would be useless for this purpose to the 
modern surveyor, though it is possible that the ancient methods 
employed crooked lines. Yet another suggestion is that these 
stones are remnants of the overlying beds, which is possible, for 
there are sarsens on the plain, some above some under ground. I 
think, however, that the fact that those now to be found are much 
smaller than the stones under discussion (the largest being barely 
more than a third of the size and the average run about that of a 
large pebble from the Pebble Eidge at Northam, North Devon), 
coupled with the fact that nowhere can one find evidence of large 
sarsens having existed in any numbers; these two considerations, 
I say, preclude the possibility of the stones being " natives." In a 
sarsen country everything that can be is made of sarsen, cottages, 
paths, gateposts, &c, as Mr, Goddard has pointed out: whereas 
here the occurrence of sarsen in the villages is most rare, and it 
seems certain that there were never many large sarsens on the 
plain, and that these stones were importations or, at best, 



By P, Farrer, 103 

abnormally large stones brought to their present positions for 
some specific purpose, as, for instance, that of gravestones. 

Altogether the earthwork and the vicinity are full of interest, 
and, when the visitor is satiated with antiquity, he can refresh his 
mind with the problems presented by the detestable huts that now 
defile the down. As whitewash has now been lavishly applied 
perhaps the less said the better but we all know that the purpose 
of whitewash is to conceal dirt. 



104 



THE CHURCH OF S. MICHAEL. 
BEINKWORTH, WILTS. 

By C. E. Ponting, F.S.A. 
[From Notes made in August, 1896.] 

The dedication of this Church to S. Michael is what one would 
expect in a Church so eminently placed — a land-mark to the 
country for many miles round. 

The Church shows great regularity both in plan and design, it 
consists of nave of five bays with north and south aisles, west 
tower and south porch, of old work, and a modern chancel ; each 
aisle has a door and four three-light pointed windows exactly 
similar, in the side wall, the east and west ends being without 
windows, whilst the north and south arcades of the nave are alike 
both in form and detail, a very rare circumstance. This is ac- 
counted for in great measure by the nave, aisles, and porch having 
been (with the exception of parts at the east and west ends of the 
south aisle) entirely rebuilt at one time, during the first quarter 
of the 15th century. The evidences of an older Church having 
existed here are : — 

(1) The tower is earlier than the nave by, perhaps, 30 years, 
and the nave is obviously built against it (this is seen more par- 
ticularly on the north side where the rubble masonry of the aisle 
is built over the wrought stone weathering of the buttress). (2) 
There are parts of the earlier wall left at the west end of the south 
aisle, where its height can be traced, and the low buttress here, 
without plinth, is coeval with the wall. It is evident that the 
nave was widened southwards only when the arcades were built, 
and this accounts for the 14th century arch of the tower not 
being central with it. The curious way in which the diagonal 
buttress here is added to the south aisle is remarkable. (3) 
There are also parts of an earlier wall, with one jamb of a 
window, at the east end of the south aisle, but altered in the 15th 
century remodelling of the aisle. (4) A single-light window and. 
priest's doorway of 14th century date were re-used in the south 
wall of the chancel (together with a two-light one of slightly latef 



The Church of S. Michael, Brinkworth, Wilts. 105 

date), when it was rebuilt in 1889. (5) The east wall of the nave 
is evidently older than the aisles, for the parapets of the latter run 
up and die out on to the earlier coping of the former. (6) The 
font, an octagonal one of stone, is of a distinct 14th century type. 
The tall proportions of its arch show that the tower was built 
against a lofty nave, which seems to point to an early date for the 
latter: and the builders of the present Church followed on the 

| same lines; for the height of its walls — 23ft. from floor to roof- 
plate — is unusual for the un-clerestoried nave of a Church of this 
size. 

To describe the Church more in detail : — The tower is of three 

! stages in height, with diagonal buttresses at N.W. and S.W. angles 
carried up for the height of the lower two stages ; it has base 

L mould and chamfered plinth and is surmounted by an embattled 

1 parapet. The lower stage has in the west wall a door with four- 
centred arch contained within a square head, with a three-light 

I window over it. In the east wall is a very fine archway of two 
orders of cavetto, the inner dying on to the jamhs, and the outer 
carried down to the floor; whilst the north and south walls are 
blank with the exception of a rough stone " relieving" arch on the 
outside, the use of which is not apparent. The middle stage has 

I a small square-headed window on the south, north, and west sides. 
The upper stage has a two-light square-headed window in each 
face, with in addition, on the south side, a small single-light by its 
side, which appears to have been made when the bells were inserted, 

j as noticed below. 

The works of remodelling carried out early in the loth century 
are characterised by great breadth and refinement; the windows 
of the aisles are large and of good detail, a bold buttress occurs 
between each pair of side windows, and the aisles have a good 
external cornice and embattled parapet ; a base mould is carried 
round the whole (with the exception of the older buttress at the 
west end of the south aisle) at the level of that of the tower; and 
it appears to have been inserted in the pieces of older wall left at 
the ends of the south aisle. The nave arcades consist of lofty 
octagonal columns and semi-octagonal responds with moulded caps 



106 The Church of S. Michael, Brinkworth, Wilts. 

and bases, supporting pointed arches of two orders of the cavetto 
mould, witli labels. The chancel arch spans the full width of the 
nave; it appears to have been inserted in the wall of an earlier 
chancel soon after the erection of the arcades. It has plain 
chamfers in lieu of hollows and these are carried down to the floor, 
the imposts having been cut away. 

The nave and both aisles retain roofs coeval with the walls : that 
of the nave is of a waggon-head vault of nine bays with oak ribs 
springing from an embattled cornice with carved bosses at the 
intersections. The easternmost bay (which came over the rood 
loft) appears to have been subdivided and the bosses of an inter- 
mediate rib still exist. The roof has two tie-beams — one at the 
west end and one over the second arch, and is covered with stone 
tiles. 

The aisles have roofs alike, of lean-to form, divided into twelve 
bays, with moulded principals, purlins, and* pole plates, having 
carved bosses at their intersections. The rafters are also moulded 
on the edge and are covered on the back by rough boarding, on 
which a covering of lead is laid (the date 1757 on that of the north 
aisle probably indicates a re-casting of the lead at that time). The 
wall plate has mouldings planted on. 

The newel-stair to the rood-loft, at the north end of the 
north aisle, was constructed at the time of the rebuilding, and 
is not an after insertion, as is more frequently the case. A doorway 
gives access to this from the aisle and the exit doorway on to the 
loft is also into the aisle, so that the loft must have been carried 
through here. (See notes at the end.) 

A squint, giving a view of the high altar from the aisle, is formed 
through the staircase in a somewhat remarkable manner. There 
is a two-light window to light the access to the loft, opposite the 
upper door, but a subsequent lowering of the turret has mutilated 
this and the upper doorway is blocked up. 

The easternmost window in each aisle is recessed below the sill,' 
as though for a tomb near the side altar. 

The porch is a large one with good outer archway and inner 
doorway (the latter four-centred), well moulded and with labels 



By C. E. Pouting, F.S.A. 107 

the terminals of which are returned: there are diagonal buttresses 
at the angles and a gabled parapet. 

The Church was rich in frescoes in the 15th century, and several 
valuable traces still exist on the walls and columns, and are 
discernible through the whitewash. 

No means of access to the top of the tower (excepting, perhaps, 
a ladder) appears to have been provided originally, but in the 17th 
century a very interesting newel-stair of oak was erected inside, 
at the S.W. angle, leading to the middle stage. The pulpit is a 
good specimen of this Jacobean period, with sounding board, the 
back panel being flanked by heraldic supporters. The panel at 
the back of the pulpit bears the inscription, "Wo be vnto me if I 
preach not the Gospel Anno Domini 1630." Also close to the 
back panel, "John beale gefri ■ h ■ inli chvrch * wardins." 
There are also curious beast supporters to the base of thepulpit itself. 
A large reading pew with a small clerk's desk below (both of 
deal and of later date) complete the composition. The font cover 
is also of this time. 

Early in the 18th century a fine oak gallery was erected across 
the westernmost bay of the nave, with staircase for access from 
the south aisle, and oak seats; this is exceedingly good work of 
the period. A three-light dormer window has been inserted in the 
nave roof to light the gallery. 

There is a peal of live fine bells in the tower. The tower roof 
is dated 1766. 

TheChurch possesses two panels displaying royal arms of different 
dates; one on the tower side of the back of the gallery with 
monogram of the letters W. M. 1693., and another on the nave side 
of G. K. 2nd. C. K. 1728. Both block the tower arch. 

There is a fine iron-bound oak chest in the south aisle. A 
chained copy of Foxe's Book of Martyrs, bound in oak covered 
with leather, and bearing the inscription on the cover, " The gifte 
of Mr. Samuell Crispe of London, Salter, to the Church of Brink- 
worth," was, some years ago, disinterred from this chest, carefully 
repaired, and again placed on view, on an oak desk against the wall. 

The altar is a beautiful one of oak with A.B. 1633 carved on the 
end. 



108 The Church of S. Michael, Brinkworth, Wilts. 

Supplementary Notes, 

The foregoing are taken from my report on the Church in 1896. 

The principal works carried out in the restoration of 1902 — 3 
are as follows : — 

The roof of the nave stripped and repaired and re-boarded, the 
plaster panels which covered the outer mouldings of the ceiling 
removed, and the roof strengthened by two additional tie beams, 
the badly-leaning south arcade set upright and, with the foundations 
of porch and parts of the aisle, underpinned. The aisle and tower 
roofs repaired, the former boarded, the lead of both re-cast. The 
porch roof re-constructed on its original lines. The rood-loft stair 
raised to its original height and other stonework repaired. The 
old paving and ledger stones relaid on concrete. 

When the bells were hung in the tower a reckless disregard was 
shown for the structure ; in order to make room for the swing of 
the bells the walls of the tower at theS.E. and N.E. angles were cut 
away to an alarming extent — in one place for two-thirds of their 
thickness — breaking through at one point, when the opportunity 
was taken to insert the small window above referred to. The bells 
have now been re-hung, in a new frame, and the walls reinstated 
to sound condition. 

The gallery has been repaired and re-seated, the space beneath 
enclosed by screens as a baptistery, and the 14th century font, from 
which the leer-tap, inserted in the east side, has been removed, set 
up on a new step. The two hatchments of royal arms have been 
repaired and fixed on the walls af the vestry under the tower. 
The pulpit has been cleared of its varnish and a new oak stair 
takes the place of the deal reading pew ; the deal box pews have 
been replaced by oak benches. 

Some points of interest were revealed in the course of the work : 
two sockets high up in the inner ring of the chancel arch, and plain 
marks and plugs on the wall above it, indicate the position in which 
the rood beam was fixed, and the length of the arms can be de- 
termined ; these sockets have been filled by a new beam and a simple 
cross erected on it. 



By G. E. Porting, F.S.A, 109 

In the underpinning of the south porch were found fragments of 
tabernacle work with colour and gilding, probably part of an altar 
piece; the stem and base of a small cross — early Norman or Saxon 
— -and an oak coffin cut out of a solid block ; this latter was lying 
north and south at a depth of over 8 feet. 

Several fragments of stonework were found elsewhere, including 
part of a Saxon shaft with cap, two pieces of an early-Norman font, 
with part of an oak bench end. 

An aumbry has been opened out near the east end of the north 
wall of the aisle, also the fragment of a corbel for figure over the 
south door. There is a stoup made from the base of a churchyard 
cross. On the east face of the tower are traces of an earlier roof, 
central with the present roof but not with the tower. 

The evidences of remains of wall paintings have been further ex- 
tended and developed ; on the eastern pillar of the south arcade can 
be seen a triple canopy with three finials painted on the stone itself, 
in red, but the niche and the figure have disappeared ; there are also 
plug holes, one in the centre and two on either side as though for 
some attachment, On the second pillar, which is to the right of the 
south entrance, the figure of a bishop with crozier was first painted, 
and, at a considerably later date, the figure of a female saint, with 
blue nimbus (probably the Blessed Virgin Mary) was painted over 
it, forming a kind of palimpsest. On this arcade the hollows of 
the two orders are decorated with the chevron ornament, alternating 
in the various arches; a similar ornament appears on the tower 
arch. 

The east wall of the nave was covered with a large painting 
around the rood, the subject of which is not clear; the colouring 
on the jambs of the chancel arch follows the line of the cove of 
the loft. 

On the north wall is a fresco much damaged by a monument 
fixed over it, but it is probably coeval with the building of the 
piisle — apparently a seated figure with the left hand held out as if 
holding something not apparent ; above this the head and shoulders 
of an angel or other figure. Over this fresco was painted a panel 
of Elizabethan character, with festoons and foliage. 



110 



CUSTOMS OF THE MANOR OF PURTON (cir. 1597). 
Transcribed by Canon F. H. Manley. 

The manor of Purton was one of the earliest possessions of the 
Abbey of Malmesbury, being granted by Caedwealha, King of 
Wessex, to Aldhelm, as the ancient charter states, "for the foun- 
dation of his Abbey at Malmesbury," A.D. 688. This charter was 
confirmed by Edward the Confessor. The Domesday " Piritone " 
is included among the estates held by the Abbey, but no mention 
is made of a mesne tenant. Early in the thirteenth century we 
find that, apart from a considerable amount of land in the parish 
which was under the immediate control of the Abbey, certain 
portions were now held under the Abbey by the tenure of knight 
service, Robert Malreward owing service to the Abbot for his 
estate of one eighth part of a Knight's fee and Adam de Peritone 
for his three parts of a knight's fee and also for another fourth part 
(Malm. Beg., vol. ii., p. 389 — 90). The property of Adam 1 de Peritone 
passed 2 by his daughters and coheirs to the families of Keynes, Wells 

1 Grandson of the first Adam de Periton, who died before 1219. The 
Peritons were owners of large estates in various counties. Their great 
position was due to two marriages, one with the coheiress of Sandford, the 
other with an heiress of Dumart, a family which had acquired considerable 
property in marriage from the great family of Baliol. From the first 
marriage came to the Peritons the bailiwick of Braydon and lands in 
Chelworth, Calcot and Oxford, from the second lands in Northumberland, 
Warwick, N orthampton and Glamorgan. 

2 Whether it was equally divided is uncertain, but probably not. A 
subsequent rearrangement of their interests in many counties was made 
between the coheirs. The Paynell part was subdivided between Paynell's 
coheirs, Lincolnshire people, of the name of Gaskrik and Pouger. There 
is a fragment of a Court Roll in existence of the " manor of Purton Gaskrik." 
Gaskrik's issue failed and Pouger succeeded. Pouger's heir married 
Suthill, SuthiU's coheirs married Norman vill and Constable. NormanviU's 
issue failed and Constable sold the manor of " Purton Powchers " als Purton 
Paynell piecemeal temp. Mary. The Keynes were unlucky. One was done 
out of his estate by the Despencers. On their fall it was recovered. Then 
the right heir was defrauded (see under " Dodford " in Baker's North- 
amptonshire, Vol 1) of this and other manors and two ladies who 
were not the lawful heirs got possession, one of them married Nicholas 
Wotton. She died without issue and her sister married to Cressy, apparently 
succeeded. Ultimately the Brydges must have bought this property. (See 
Wilts N. Sf Q., vol. i„ " Annals of Purton.") 



Customs of the Manor of Purton (cir. 1597). Ill 

and Paynel. Again through failure of male heirs the Keynes property 
passed to the family of Wotton, while that of Paynel descended to 
the family of Poucher, and from them to the family of Constable. 
These various properties seem all to have been called " manors " 
so that we find mention of the Manors of Purton Keynes, Purton 
Pouchere, Purton Wotton, Purton Constable, &c. The principal 
estate, however, " the Great Manor/' and the Rectory Manor 
acquired by the Abbey in 1276 — 7, remained under the Abbey 
directly, and at the dissolution these were granted by the Crown 
to "Edmunde Briges esquier 1 & Dorothy Brave," & their heirs 
8th May, 1544. Another manor in Purton, that of Pevenhyll, 
had its origin in the Malreward property, which came later to the 
Walerand family, and then passed by descent through various 
families 2 to that of Essex early in the sixteenth century. We 
can thus trace five manors in Purton, (i.) the Great Manor, (ii.) 
Pevenhill (Malreward's), (iii.) Powcher's (Paynell's), (iv.) Keynes', 
(v.) the Rectory Manor, Towards the end of the sixteenth century 
the copyholders became more and more the owners of their holdings 
by purchase from the lords of the various manors. This process 
was hastened by what took place in 1593-4, when the Brydges 
family, who were lords of the manor of Pyrton, als. Puryton, 
owners of the "parsonadge of Pyrton," lords of the manor of 
Pyrton Keynes als. Stoake 3 &c, were joined by John Sadler, genfc., 
lord of the manor of Pyrton Pevenhyll and the occupiers of the 
" dismembered " manor of Pyrton Powchers in agreeing to a general 
readjustment of their holdings. Among the deeds at Basset Down is 
a confirmation of this settlement by Wm. Lord Chandos, Sir Wm, 
Knollys, and Lady Dorothy, his wife, ratifying to the tenants, copy- 
holders, and farmers the exchanges made, dated 31st Jan., 1596-7. 

1 Edmund Brydges in 1557 succeeded his father as 2nd Lord Chandos and 

died 1572, leaving two sons who each succeeded to the title, Giles on the 

death of his father and William on the death of Giles in 1593. Dorothy 

: Bray was daughter and co-heiress of Wm. Lord Bray. She married, secondly, 

Sir Wm. Knolles (afterwards Earl of Banbury) and died 1605. 

a By the heiress of Walerand it came to Rogers and by the heiress of 
I Rogers to Essex temp. Hen. 7. By the heirs of Essex it was sold directly 
1 or otherwise to Sadler. 

3 It is doubtful whether Purton Stoke is identical with Purton Keynes. 
VOL. XL. — NO. CXVIII. H 



112 Customs of the Manor of Purton (cir. 1597). 

There is in the possession of Mrs. Story Maskelyne a draft with cor- 
rections and alterations of an "Answer " to a bill brought against 
Mr. Edmund Maskelyne some 36 years after this enclosure with 
reference to a field called " The Downe Plott." This is in the writing 
of Mr. Edmund Maskelyne, and gives his views (though perhaps 
not in their final and authorized form) about the Manors of Purton 
at the time of the enclosure and their owners as follows : — (i.) " The 
Right Honourable Wm. now Earle of Banbury and the Lady 
Dorothy Chandos his then wyfe . . . were lawfully seised of 
some Estate of Inheritance . . , in the Mannor & Lordshypp 
of Pyrton als. Puryton, in the Capytall measuadge or ffarme &• 
Rectory or p'sonadg of Pyrton als. Puryton & in dyvers Coppyholds 
& Customary tenem'ts in the said p'ishe of Pyrton . . . for- 
merly parcel of the possessions of the late dissolved monastry of 
Malmesbury , , . and then were & yet are holden by knights 
s'vyce in capite. (ii.) They were also seised &c. in the Mannor 
of Pyrton Kaynes als. Pyrton Stoake, the Capytall messuadg or 
ffarme of Pyrton Kaynes, called Neales ffarme & dyvers Copyhold 
& customary tenem'ts lying in the said p'ishe of Pyrton . . 
held in Socage in Chief, (iii.) dyvet's inhabitants of Pyrton were 
seised of some Estate of Inheritance in dyvers messuadgs &c 
heretofore parcel of the possessions of Sr. Rob'te Constable, knight 
deceased, as of his Mannor of Pyrton Powchers, long sithence dis- 
membered holden by knights s'vyce (iv.) John Sadler gen, deceased 
was seised &c. in the Manor or Capytall messuadg or ffarm of Pur- 
ton Pevenhyll . . . holden in free & common Socadge tenure." 1 

1 In Mr. Nevill Maskelyne's note book, also preserved at Basset Down, 
under date 1638 is given a list of occupiers of holdings, 145 in all, apparently 
for the whole parish, with annual value of each, under. the headings :- 
Church End, Resterrope & peuven hill, West Marsh & Wyddiam, Stoake & 
bentham, Perton Pouchers, Perton VVotton. It concludes thus: — "The 
particulers of great Perton and perton Kaynes is per ann. 2422li. 10s. The 
stint of beasts 489, yerling 20. The particulers of the Manour of Perton 
Powchers is per ann. 238li. The stint of beasts 45, yerlings 5. The particulers 
of the Manour of Perton VVotton is per ann. 242li. The stint of beasts 48, 
yerlings 1. The whole stint 583 beasts, 26 yerlings. The Demaynes of all 
Perton is per ann. 2982li. Total beasts & yerlings 596." Here the manor 
of Pevenhill seems merged in the larger manors. 



Transcribed by Canon F. H. Manley, 113 

In 10 Geo. II. an Act of Parliament was passed to carry out en- 
closures of commons in Pnrfcon (Wilts N. & Q., iv. 267 — 70). At that 
date George Pitt, of Strathfieldsea, was Lord of the Manors of 
Great Purbon, Purbon Keynes, and Pnrfcon Ponchers, while 
Anthony, Earl of Shaftesbury, was impropriator of the rectory and 
owner of the great tithes and advowson. 

The original MS, of the "customes" printed below is also at 
Basset Down, and the writing is similar to that of the "confirma- 
tion," so that although undated it was probably written at the 
time when a new arrangement with regard to much of the land in 
the parish was coming into existence. As a record of rules which 
had been in force from time immemorial these customs may be 
compared with those for Bradford-on-Avon Manor, held by the 
Abbey of Shaftesbury, printed in an earlier volume oi this Magazine 
(v., 71—76). 



Crrtaine Customes belonging to the Mannor of Pirton. 

Inprimis our Custome is that the Lord of this Mannor may grant three 
lyues in possession or t[hree] lyves in reversion of any Copyhold within 
his Mannor and no more by our Custome and not reu'con uppon. 1 

[2] Item our Custome is if the ffather being the first purchasor to him and 
his Children to holde successiuely may at his pleasure surrender his 
estate into the Lords hands to the use of hymself or others and Cutt 
of his owne C[hildren] unless the Children doe give any money to the 
purchase with the ffathers estat and openly knowne in the C[ourt] 
lykewise the last wife of every sonne being tenant or any other named 
in hhe Copy to hold successively [shall] have her widdowes estate ac- 
cording to the Custome. 

[3] Item our Custome is the wife named in the Coppy her husband dead 
may marry without lycence and keepe her estate duringe her life though 
shee have neuer so many husbands although her husband [doe] surrender 
in his life tyme that doth not take away his wyues estate except shee 
[come] into the Court and conse[nt un]to the same also. 



1 See Custom 9. If the Lord had granted to A the lease of a Copyhold 
into which he would enter on death or surrender of B, the holder, then 
before A had entered into possession the Lord could not grant a lease of 
this property to C to become operative on the death or surrender of A. 

H 2 



114 Customs of the Manor of Purton (cir. 1597). 

4 Item our Custom e is if the first taker doe doe (sic) purch[ase] unto him 
and certaine Strangers to holde successively he may as well Cutt off 
the Strangers as the father may his Children except the Strangers do 
lay their [money] toward the purchase of the same and openly knowne 
in the Court. 

5 Item our Custome is if that the ffather doe purchase any estate to hee 
and his children the ffather deceased the next taker cannot surrender 
for tyme of his life if he so doe the next taker being in the same copy 
(if lyvinge) ymmediately shall enter into it by our Custome. 

6 Item our Custome is if a graunt be made to a man and his daughter, 
and shee after the death of her ffather entreth the Coppyholde shee may 
take a husbande without lycence not breaking Custome nor cause of 
forfeiture nor losse of heriott to the Lord for she is steedeholder l and 
not her husbande. 

7 Item our Custome is that if a tennt dieth before our Lady Day in lent 
his executors shall have the p'fitt of his lyving 2 till Michaelmas next 
following paying all duties to the Lord, the Steane mead 3 and the 
vallowe excepted to the next taker And if she dye after our Lady Day 
and before Michaelmas his executors shall holde till Michaelmas then 
next come twelvemonth leaving the vallowe and Steanemead as afore- 

* said. 

8 Item our Custome is the widowe uppon her determynacon of her estate 
by death shall leave the Lord an heriott but uppon forfeiture non att 
all for that her estate is fallen thereby into the Lords hands or the 
next taker in reu'con when it shall happen. 

9 Item our Custome is that graunts in reu'con are good of any Customary 
tenem't so it be not reu'con uppon reu'con which is contrary to our 
Custome. 

10 Item our Custome is that when an Infant cannott occupy his Coppy- 
holde, the mother or next of Kynn ought to have the use of his Copy- 
holde to the profitt of the Infant and also the Custody of his body 
Except his ffather in his last Will and Testament doe appoint it to 
any other to the p'fytt of the Infant and also the Custody of his body 
till he doth come to age if they will take it on them. 

1 No instance of the use of this word is given in Wright's English Dialect 
Dictionary, 1905, but "stead" occurs with the meaning especially in 
Yorkshire of a " farmhouse and buildings." 

2 Commonly at this date used for " farm." 

3 " Certain parcels of meadow called Steane Meade ... in a place 
called Vennys " are mentioned in the Inq. p.m. of Edmund Maskelyne, 1630, 
and " 6 acres of Steanemeade ... in a place called Smithmeade " in 
the Inq. p.m. of William Digges, 1641. Here the term would seem to have 
to do with some right of the tenant to dig stone. 



Transcribed by Canon F. H. Manley. 115 

1 1 Item our Custome is to haue all such meadows pastures lands errable 
Comons feedings which is p'te and parcell of our Copyholde which he 
hath belonging or nowe is accustomably occupyed as well in Braden as 
elswhere to be ours by our Custome. 

12 Item our Custome is to haue all manner of Tymber for our reparacons 
of Custom'y tents as offten as needs shall require, as well for dores 
wyndowes as other great tymber appointed by the Lord's officer and 
also that we shoulde ha ye sande for the same reparacons in the Comon 
and also stones if we have any within our errable ground euery man 
uppon his owne grounde. 

13 Item our Custome is if wee take tymber for reparacon of bridge we 
should have it delivered by the Lord or his officers as often as need 
shall require. 

14 Item our Custome is that all Toppes starved trees and wyndfalls and 
shrowdes ' all underwood as thorne maple hazell and withy as other 
to be ours by our Custome. 

15 Item our Custome is if a man doe purchase a Coppyholde for himself 
and his wife naming his wyues Christen name in the Copy that then 
shee shall eniOy it during her life and if shee doe bury her husbande 
And if it fortune that the man doe bury his wife and marryeth another 
and then he deceaseth the last wife shall enioy her widowes estate by 
oure Custome. 

16 Item our Custome is that uppon the death of a Copyholder the Lord 
ought to haue an heriott if the tent ought to pay them, of his best 
quicke* Cattell that he hath of his owne at the day of the death of the 
tennt and for lack of such other Cattell the best of his other goods. 

17 Item our Custome is that he that holdeth by Copy of lycence may 
make tennt and under tenants as he shall think good by vertue of the 
same Copy. 

18 Item our Custome is that a Copyholder may keepe thoccupacon of 
his Copyholde in his owne hands not dwelling uppon the same himself 
but his s'vants without lycence. 

19 Item our Custome is that a surrender made out of Court by any 
Custom'y tennts before two or three other Custom'y tennts of this 
Man nor is good So as the same surrender be presented at the next 
Court. 

20 Item our Custome is that if the Lord or his Steward doe graunt any 
Copy or Copies they cannot be good till they be published before the 
homage in the Lords Court when they ought to be taken. 

1 Wood cut off from growing trees. The verb is commonly used to denote 
trimming a tree or hedge. 

2 Alive. 



116 Customs of the Manor of Purton (cir. 1597). 

21 Item our Custome is if any tennt doe lose his Copy by mysfortune yet 
shall he keepe his lyvinge And if there be any other ioyned with him 
in the same Copy in reu'con of him he shall as well enioy it after the 
death forfeiture or surrender by our Custome. 

22 Item our Custome is that if a Copy in reu'con be graunted by the Lord 
and lawfully taken before the Homage in the Court and the Copy to be 
lost by mysfortune before the reu'con doth fall after the death forfeiture 
or surrender of any Custom'y tennt that last was this Reu'coner or 
Reu'coners shall enioy it by our Custome and any such reu'coners shall 
come into the Court and clayme it within twelvemoneth and a day or 
any man for him. 

23 Item our Custome is if any Copyholder hauing any Rowlesseholde 1 may 
put out any part of his Copyholde for one yeare havinge it once in his 
owne hands. 

24 Item our Custom is that when any tennt deceaseth whosoever is next 
Taker ought to come into the Court to make his clayme and there to be 
admitted tennt according to the Custome And if that it [should] happen 
that the Steward for the absence of the Lord will not admitt him 
tennt uppon his clayme and the p'ty that so hath claymed dyeth that 
the Lord ought to haue a heriott or heriotts and his wife ought to 
haue her widows estat. 

25 Item our Custome is that no other man that is sworne with us shall 
haue to doe with anythinge that appertayneth to our Custome but 
those that be Customary tennts. 

26 Item our Custome is that for all amercyam'ts' 2 paines and all orders 
which app'taineth to the Lords Court ought to be affered 3 by the 
Custom'ry tennts. 

27 Item our Custome is that the Constables and Tythingman ought to be 
chosen yearly by the Steward and homage And that when Barsfeild 4 

1 This curious expression, variously spelt " roughleaze," "roughless," "the 
roueless" "roveless," &c, occurs in Wilts and Somerset documents from 
the time of Eliz. to the middle of the last century. (Wright's Eng, Dialect 
Diet., 1905.) Sometimes it is used of a building, e.g., "a toft or roueless 
tenement," sometimes of a field or holding, eg., "all that roveless tenement 
called Comptons containing 16 acres, &c." That it means a property in an 
impoverished or derelict condition is clear, but the derivation of the term 
is doubtful. (See Wilts Arch Mag., xxvii., 145 ; xxx., 258 ; xxxii., 225—7.) 

2 "A pecuniary fine arbitrarily imposed by assessors." (Cowel's Law 
Terms.) 

3 " Affeerers such as are appointed in Court Leets upon oath to set the 
Fines on such as have committed faults, &c." (Cowel's Law Terms.) 

4 " Barfeild " is mentioned in the Inq. p.m. of Edmund Maskelyne and 
Wm. Digges. Apparently elsewhere called " Berkfield " . . . a large 
field held in strips, lying N.E. of the Church. 



Transcribed by Canon F. H. Manley. 117 

is wheat and hitchin 1 the Tythingman ought to be one of the great 
Mannor 2 for that he hath two stiches 3 of mead in Litle mead in respect 
of his office and when Barsfield is vallowe the Tythingman ought to be 
one of the Knighten 4 tenants. 

28 Item our Custome is that if any tennt being a Copyholder make default 
at the Lords Court having a lawful busyness may be assigned by a 
penny and so to saue his amercyam'ts. 

29 Item our Custome is that all Stray ers taken within this Mannor under 
vis. viiid. are to the farmer of this Mannor and if they be above the 
same value, then they are to Remayne to the Lord of the Mannor. 

30 Item our Custome is if any tennt holde one two or three tenements or 
messuags at his death he ought to pay unto the Lord for any messuage 
or tenement one heriot except it doth otherwise appeare by his Copy. 

31 Item our Custome is if any tennt shall happen to be attainted of 
treason or felony the wife shall not haue her widowes estate aflfter the 
death of her husbande bycause her husband dyed not seised therof. 

32 Item our Custome is that if the Lord graunt by Copy of Courtroll to 
any tennt three lyues every tenant being in possession ought to pay an 
heriot or heriots after their death according to the Custome. 

33 Item our Custome is that it shall not be lawfull for any Custom'y 
tennt to give or sell any manner of tymber Tynnett 6 or shrowdes 
growing in and uppon his Customary tenement without the Lords 
licence. 

34 Item our Custome is that it is not lawfull for any Copyholder to 
fell any great Tymber growing in and uppon his Copyholde without 
the Lords licence. 

35 Item our Custome is that if the ffather doth make any forfeiture uppon 
his Copyholde That hit shall not take away the right and interest of 
the next reu'coner or reu'coners but they shall haue and enioy the 
same according to the Custome. 

36 Item our Custome is that no tennt that holdeth by Copy of Courtroll 
may make any undertennt or tenants uppon his Copyholde aboue a 
yeare and a day without a Copy of lycence graunted by the Lord of 
the Manor. ___ 

1 Fart of a field ploughed and sown during the year in which the rest of 
the field lies fallow. (Wright's Eng. Dialect Diet., 1905.) 

2 The manor before the dissolution held under the direct control of the 
Abbey. 

3 " A narrow ridge of land." (Wright's Engl. Dialect. Diet., 1905.) Still 
in use. 

4 The tenants of the manors held under the Abbey by knight's service. 

5 |C Wood used for filling a gap in a hedge ; brush wood," from verb 
41 tine," meaning to shut, enclose. (Wright's Eng. Dialect Diet., 1905.) 



118 Customs of the Manor of Furton (cir. 1597). 

37 Item our Custome is that if two or three doe come to the Court and 
they doe take of the Lorde a Copyholde and every of them doth pay 
part of the fyne Then they be takers all three Then non of them can 
defeat the other by our Custome. 

38 Item our Custome is that if a man take of the Lord by Copy of Court 
any Messuage or Tenement for himself and two of his Children or one 
Childe and not name the names of them but leave it a space for them 
or one of them it is not good. 

39 Item our Custome is that if any tennt of this Mannor doth not pay 
his rent within a year and a [day] next after the same is due being 
lawfully demanded and that there be no sufficyent distresse can be had 
uppon the tenement for the levying of the fine That then such a tennt. 
in such default being doth forfeit his Copyholde by our Custome. 

40 Item our Custome is that if any wydowe within this Mannor which 
holdeth any Customary tenem't in this Mannor by her freebench l 
according to the Custome of the same Mannor doe marry or lyve 
incontinently unmarried and that incontynency be publiquely proued 
and knowne to the homage Then such widowe so marrying or lyving 
incontinently unmarried doth by our Custome forfeit and lose her 
estate of freebench and the tenement and lands wherof her husbande 
dyed seised unto the next taker in reu'con or unto the Lord for want 
of such [taker] in reu'con Notwithstanding if any man shall for malice 
or any other deuellish intent say or report that he hath carnally Knowne 
any widowe That shall not be a sufficient prooff except it be so lawful! 
as the ecclesiasacall law doth allow of. 



1 " The estate in Copyhold Lands which a wife on decease of her husband 
hath, &c." (Cowel's Law Terms), where also various places are mentioned 
at which curious penalties were enforced for breach of conditions mentioned 
here. See also Addison's Spectator, No. 623. 



119 



PERAMBULATION OF PURTON, 1733. 
Transcribed by Mrs. T. Story Maskelyne. 1 

The following is a verbatim copy of the Perambulation of Purton, 
the original of which is at Basset Down, and has been in the 
possession of the Maskelyne family ever since it was written in 
1733, when in all likelihood Nevil Maskelyne, who sold the old 
family mansion of West Marsh, Purton, and went to live at Purton 
Down, made one of the party who perambulated the parish. 

The old custom of perambulating the parish, or beating the 
bounds, was of great importance in days before accurate maps were 
in the possession of parish authorities, and for want of keeping up 
the old custom parish boundaries were often confused, as is the case 
in more than one instance in the outlying parts of Wroughton. 

Rogation- tide, in May, was the time when these perambulations 
took place, and the day was begun with prayer in the Church, as 
in the older Rogation services of pre-Reformation days, when God's 
blessing was asked on the crops and labour of the coming year. 

Amongst many interesting facts mentioned in the Purton 
Perambulation of 1733 I should like to call attention to the 
penny paid by Orchard, the miller, at his mill, to the minister of 
Purton, "which was an ancient custom!' Orchards Mill or Elvers 
Mill was originally known as Ayldeford, and was as such mentioned 
on the boundary of Braden Forest in the time of Henry III. 

Prom Wilts Notes and Queries, vol. L, p, 435-8, we learn that this 
mill was the oldest mill in Purton, and that it existed long before 
Abbot Wm. Colerne erected his mill, rather nearer his church 
land in Purton. 

Another interesting fact is to note the number of oaks which 
marked important points in the parish boundary, where during the 
perambulation a "Gospel was read and a cross made," hi the 
days of old. No fewer than five of the oaks were known by 
distinguishing names : — Greenhill Oak, Gospel Oak, Charnham Oak, 
Pin Oak, Jaques Oak, all stood at important places in the boundary, 

1 The Society is indebted to Mrs. Story Maskelyne for the cost of the map 
illustrating this paper. 



120 Perambulation of Pur ton, 1733. 

bub these oaks were mostly dead and gone in 1733, and other trees 
were chosen to represent the spot where they once grew. 

The " Gospel Oak " here mentioned as having in 1733 " formerly 
stood " on the boundary between the parishes of Purton and 
Cricklade is mentioned ( Wilts Arch. Mag., vi., 200) in a Survey 
taken in 1591, 33 Eliz., of " the woodes adionyninge unto the 
Forest of Braidon " belonging to the Duchy of Lancaster, and a 
paper by J. Y. Akerman on "The ancient Limits of the Forest of 
Braden " (Archceologia, xxxvii., 304) is accompanied by a map, 
from the 1 inch Ordnance Survey of 1828, in which " Gospel 
Oak" 1 is placed about f mile N.W. of Eed Lodge House, a few 
hundred yards W. of the cross roads on the 1ST. side of the road 
leading towards Great Lodge (or, as it is called in the modern 
Ordnance Map, Ravenhurst House Lodge). Mr. J. E. Ward, of 
Red Lodge {Wilts Notes and Queries, viii., 526, Sept., 1916) carries 
the history of the tree back to the 5th year of Elizabeth, when it 
was mentioned in an indenture under the Duchy seal recited in 
an abstract of title now in Mr. Ward's possession, dated 31 March 
in that year, Gospel Oak Farm derived its name from the tree. 
In 1865 the tree bearing this name was cut down, and its stump 
taken to Cricklade and placed on the Vicarage lawn. Here it 
remained until 1913, when in consequence of the wide currency 
given to Bishop G. Forrest Browne's suggestion that it marked the 
meeting-place of St. Augustine with the British Bishops in A..D. 
603, an event which he contended took place near Malmesbury, 
and not as previous authors had assumed, at Aust, near the old 
passage on the Severn, the stump became an object of interest and 
was placed in St. Sampson's Church for preservation. 2 The Bishop 
set forth his theory in Some Results of the Battles of Deorham and 
Wanborough, and enlarged upon it in a lecture given to the 
Historical Association at Bristol, an abstract of which is printed 
in the Bristol Diocesan Magazine, Feb., 1914, in which he suggests 
either the Gospel Oak at the Cricklade — Purton boundary, or the 
" Oak Farm " at Down Ampney, two miles from Cricklade, as the 






1 This however may refer to the farm and not to the tree itself. 
2 Wilts Arch. Mag., xxxviii., 633. 



Transcribed by Mrs. Story Maskelyne. 121 



site of the meeting. Meanwhile a pamphlet by Mr. J. Lee Osborn. 

The Gospel Oak, Gricklade, St. Augustine's Meeting -place with the 
British Bishops} Cirencester, 1913, assumed that the Bishop's sug- 
gestion was proved, and the legend that it was " St. Augustine's 
Oak " became attached to the relic. The tree was never so called, 
though some tradition of " early Christians having met under 
it" is said to have attached to it. The evidence of the 
Perambulation of 1733 here given however seems to suggest that 
it gained its name of " Gospel Oak " simply from the fact that it 
was one of the trees on the parish boundary under which a gospel 
was read at the beating of the bounds. On the other hand it may 
be argued that as this tree is the only one amongst the several 
oaks mentioned which bears the title of " Gospel Oak," this fact 
would seem to point to some special tradition attaching to this 
particular spot. In any case it is to be noticed that the original 
"Gospel Oak" had disappeared before 1733, so that the stump 
now in Cricklade Church cannot itself claim to be of the age which 
has sometimes been attributed to it. 

The matter is further complicated through the discovery by Canon 
F. H. Manley of a map preserved in the Public Kecord Office, 
showing how the lands in Braden Forest awarded to the Crown 
J by the Commissioners at the time of disafforesting were to be 
divided between the lessees of the Crown. In this map of datecir. 
1632, two "Gospel Oaks" are marked, one near the site of the tree 
cut down in 1865 and another considerably to the west, near where 
the road from Purton Stoke turns to the north. 2 The fact that two 
trees are marked as "Gospel Oaks" is a strong argument that the 
name merely meant a tree where a gospel was read at the parish 
perambulation. 

The term " Langett " used several times in this perambulation 
occurs in a great many places in the Map of Purton made in 1744 
as "Langate," or " Landgate," and is shown as a long narrow strip 
or lane. In one place " Drive or Landgate "is the expression used. 
It appears to mean the way by which a man gained access to his 
• land." 

1 Wilts Arch. Mag., xxxviii., 523. 
2 This second oak is marked q on the Sketch Map on the E. side of the 
road to Minety between Gospel Oak and Great Lodge. 



122 



Perambulation of Purton, 1733. 




Transcribed by Mrs. Story Maskelyne. 123 

The Perambulation. 

A true and Exact Perambulation of the whole Parish of Purton in the 
county of Wilts in the year of our Lord 1733 shewing all the boundaries of 
the said Parish with a particular account where the Procession began and 
ended and of all the several places where Gospels were read and Crosses 
made & all occurances that happened being the business of two Days 
as followeth. 

Meeting at the Parish Church of Purton the third day of May where 
Prayers being ended the Procession went from thence down to the Water 
in Jobbers Lane where a Gospel was read <fc and a cross made, from thence 
went along the bottom of the Earl of Shaftesburys Grove piece leaving the 
hedge on the left hand and so thro Thomas Brays ground heretofore 
Gillams into the said Earl of Shaftesburys Saunders's closes where a Gospel 
was read and a Cross Cut on the right hand side of an Ashen tree standing 
in an old decayed Mound in the middle of the upper close from thence into 
Bagbury Green where a Gospel was read and a Cross made from thence 
thro three Grounds the lands of Thomas Hardyman Esq r . leaving the hedge 
on the left hand we came into Restrop lane where a Gospel was read and 
a Cross made from thence thro a Ground the Land of Toby Richmond Esq r . 
called Dry field then thro a ground of the said Earl of Shaftesbury called 
Iles's rented of his Lordsh p by W m . Templar then thro a Ground the Lands 
of Tho Norton, then thrd two Grounds the land of the said Toby Richmond 
then thro Charles Packers Garden held by lease from the s d Toby Richmond 
then thro a Garden the lands of Nevil Maskelyne Esq r . then thro a ground 
the lands of the said Toby Richmond called Green hill Ground then thr6 a 
Ground the lands of John Jefferris called also Green hill Ground. Then thro 
a Ground the lands of Wm. Morse then thro another Ground of the said 
William Morse held by lease from the said Earl of Shaftesbury stil leaving 
the hedge and Lidiard lane on the left hand, then thro into Greenhill to 
an Oak there called Greenhill Oak 1 where a Gospel was read and a Crosse 
cut on the said Oak on the right hand side thereof and money thrown 
amongst the boys and to Every person there present was given Cakes and 
Ale from thence to an Oak about the middle of Greenhill where a Gospel 
was read and a Cross cut on the right hand side of the said Oak from 
thence to a place at the bottom of Greenhill where a M eer Stone formerly 
stood near Sugham's ford which divides the Common & Manor of Purton 
from the Manor of Lidiard Millicent where a Gospel was read and a Cross 
made from thence thro a Ground of the said Nevil Maskelyne at the bottom 
of Greenhill into Purton Comon and from thence into the said Earl of 
Shaftesbury Purlieu to a place where an Oak called Pin Oak formerly 
stood where a Gospel was read and a Cross made fromjbhence in a direct 
line thro the said Purlieu into the Langett in Purton Comon where a Gospel 
was read and a Crosse made from thence up the road leading to Brinkworth 
leaving the Meerstones near Webbs wood on the left hand and the Comon 

1 There is at Basset Down an interesting Map of the Parish of Purton, 
in which every field and house is intended to be marked. Unfortunately 
none of the oaks here mentioned are marked. It is dated 1744. 



124 Perambulation of Pur ton, 1733. 

of Purton on the right hand to a place near where an Oak called Jaques 
Oak formerly stood near Lookers Wood where a Gospel was read and a 
Crosse made and money thrown amongst the Boys, from thence leaving 
Lookers Wood on the right hand we came into Momes Leaze and a large 
Inclosure belonging to the Earl of Berkshire Somerford Comon & Milburn 
Comon 1 on the left hand we came to the upper end or corner of Momes Leaze 
where a Gospel was read and a Crosse made From thence leaving tho 
Inclosures of the said Earl of Berkshire on the left hand we came to the 
Way that leads fromi Purton to Malmesbury crossing the way into the 
lands of Mrs. Jacob Widow leaving the said Way on the left hand til we 
came to an Inclosure of the said Earl of Berkshire then leaving the s 4 
Inclosure on the left hand til we came to the top of the hill called 
Worthy Hill turning up the lane that leads to Minety where a Gospel 
was read and Crosse made then leaving the Inclosures belonging 
to the Manor of Charleton on the left hand and the Wood called Dutchy 
Coppices on the right hand we came to a place where an Oak formerly 
stood called Charnham Oak 2 where a Gospel was read and Crosse made & 
money thrown amongst the Boys & two Boys fought. This is the utmost 
Bound of the West part of the perambulation of Purton from thence thro 
the Dutchy Wood the lands of the said Mrs. Jacob leaving the strait Hedge 
and the Exchequer Lands 3 stil on the left hand we came to the lands of 
Mr. Nott 4 then thro the Dutchy Lands of the said Mr. Nott stil leaving the 
Exchequer Lands on the left hand then thro the Dutchy lands of the said 
Mrs. Jacob leaving the Exchequer lands of the said Mr. Nott and Mrs. 
Munday on the left hand we came to a house called Willis's House going 
between the said House and the Dutchy 5 coppice then to a place where an 
Oak formerly stood called Gospel Oak where a Gospel was read & a Crosse 
made and Money thrown amongst the Boys and to Every person there 
present were given Cakes & Ale then thro the estate of Mr. Neale being 

1 These pieces of ground were granted, it seems, to the copyholders of 
Little Somerford and Milbourne at the time of the disafforesting of 
Braden, 1631, in lieu of the rights of feeding which they claimed in the 
Forest. By an Enclosure Act of 1796 the land was divided up between the 
owners of property in these parishes according to their rights of feeding. 

2 This oak stood at the place where the parishes of Charlton, Purton, and 
Cricklade St. Sampson meet. It was the spot from which the ancient 
perambulations of the Forest of Braden always started. The name occurs 
in the Perambulation of Chas. I.'s time, when the tree was no doubt standing. 
In earlier Perambulations this spot is called " la Beostocke," " Betstolke," 
&c. In a map of about 1632 of the Crown Lands in Braden, it is called 
Charlton Oak, and in the survey of 1691 (Wilts Arch. Mag., vi., 200) 
" Charlame Oke." 

3 The Crown Lands under the administration of the Exchequer Court. 

4 The Nott family for many years were lessees under the Crown of the 
Great Lodge Estate. 

5 The Crown Lands under the administration of the Duchy of Lancaster, 
now the modern parish of Braden. 



Transcribed by Mrs. Story Maskelyne. 125 

Duchy lands til we came to the house of one John Stoneham (an Ale house) l 
then thro the Estate of the Rev. Mr. Butler being Dutchy lands leaving 
the Hedge Oricklade Road and the Exchequer Lands of the said Mr. Neal 
stil on the left hand til we came thro into Cricklade Koad then leaving the 
Hedge belonging to the Dutchy and the Exchequer lands on the left hand 
til we came to the Gate at the end of the lane, then leaving the said Gate 
on the left hand we went thro the Hedge on the right hand into the lands 
of Mr. Rich being Dutchy lands leaving the hedge and the Exchequer lands 
on the left hand til we came to the Corner of the Poors Plot 2 where a Gospel 
was read and a Crosse made from thence thro a Ground called Pancake 
Hall crossing the Brook 3 into Stoake Common along the said Comon til we 
came to the north Corner of the said Poors Plat leaving the Hedge of the 
said Piatt on the left hand where the Perambulation for this day ended. 

Meeting the fourth day of May in Stoake Comon 4 against the North 
Corner of the said Poors Plat to continue the said Perambulation from 
thence we proceeded to the upper End of Stoake Comon leaving the lands of 
the said Mr. Rich (being the Exchequer) on the left hand so on directly up 
jthe Berry Hill Grounds leaving the lands of the said Mr. Rich stil on the 
left hand so stil directly on thro the lands of George 5 Pitt Esqr. til we came 
to a lane leading from Minety Comon to Monies leaze Leaving the lands 
belonging to the said Mrs. Monday &, the said Mr. Nott on the left hand 
(being Exchequer land) where a Gospel was read and a Cross made. Then 
proceeding crosse the End of the same Ground leaving the said Lane on the 
left hand where a Gospel was read and a Cross made, then returning down 
the lands of the said George Pitt til we came to a pond at the corner of the 
Ragg meads 6 leaving the lands of the said Mrs. Jacob and of the said Mr.Nott 
on the left hand (being Exchequer lands) making a short turn on the left hand 
down the Ragg mead & so on til we came to the Corner of the Great Ragg, 

1 Called the " Black Dog " in Map of Purton, 1744. 
2 This is the land, 25 acres, allotted to the poor of Purton Stoke at the 
time of the disafforesting of Braden. It lies in the parish of Cricklade 
| St. Sampson. 

3 Rey river. 

4 This land was presumably ancient common but some of it was perhaps 
allotted to the copyholders of Purton Stoke at the time of the disafforesting 
of Braden in lieu of their rights of feeding in the forest. By the Purton 
Enclosure Act of 1737 it was divided up between these owners of property. 

5 Of Strathfieldsaye. His son was raised to the peerage as Baron Rivers. 
The third Baron took the name of Pitt Rivers. The title became extinct 
in J 880. Aubrey tells us that " George Pitt, Esq ," was owner of the Manor 
of Minety. He was father of the man mentioned in the text, and married 
the relict of George Brydges, Lord Chandos, to which family the manors 
of Minety and Purton were granted, 8th May, 1544. It was sold by Lord 
Rivers early in the last century. (Britton's North Wilts, p. 56.) 

6 This word is used with reference to tracts of wood, e.g., Dutchy Ragg, 

(Vouchers Ragg, but also of fields, as here and in other parts of Purton (1744 
map). 



126 Perambulation of Purton, 1733. 

leaving the lands of Mrs. Cox 1 Widow on the left hand where a Gospel was 
read and a Crosse made Then proceeding in a direct line til we came to a 
corner against the Great Purlieu where a Gospel was read & a cross made 
and so all throgh the lands of the said George Pitt (formerly Enclosed out 
of the Comon of Purton Stoake) til we came to a small Stream called 
Stoake Brook leaving the lands of the said Mrs. Cox and Thomas Warner 
Esqr. on the left hand from thence we crossed the said Stream into a 
Ground called Monks the land of Samuel Shepherd then thro a Ground of 
the Widow Trinders into Littleworth Lane leaving the lands of the said 
Thomas Warner & of late Henry Sheppard on the left hand from whence 
we proceeded on to the Midway in the said Lane where a Gospel was read 
and a Cross made near the Shore of the ditch on the Right Band & also 
on an Ashen Tree over against the same and to every person there present 
was Given Cakes & Ale from thence we went thro into a Ground the lands 
of Henry Broadway and so into a ground called Littleworth the lands of 
Mr. James Dyer then into a Ground called East Mead the lands of Mr. 
Robert Moulden then into a Ground called Hast Mead the lands of Mr. 
Robert Carter then into a ground called Hay laines the lands of the said 
Henry Broadway then into two grounds called Hay laines the Lands of 
the said Earl of Shaftesbury and also into a Ground called Great Hayes the 
Lands of the said Earl of Shaftesbury then into a Lane called Hayes Lane 
leaving the Lands of Mr. John Self of the late Henry Sheppard of Edward 
Pleydel Esqr. of the said Widow Trinder of the late William Orchard and 
three other Grounds belonging to the Parish of Cricklade on the left hand 
where a Gospel was read and a Crosse cut on an Oak on the right hand 
side thereof belonging to the Earl of Shaftesbury from thence into a 
Ground called Little Hayes the Lands of the said Earl of Shaftesbury then 
into a Ground called the Hayes the lands of Richard Gardiner then into a 
Ground called Marsh furlong the Lands of Mr. Thomas Pleydel then into 
a Ground called also Marsh furlong the lands of the said Earl of Shaftesbury. 
Then into a Ground called Ten Acres the Land of Martha Pepwal Spinster 
then into a Ground called Gossey Mead then into a Ground called the 
Langett and also into another Ground called the Langett, all three 
the lands of the said Earl of Shaftesbury leaving the Lands of the 
said Richard Gardiner and a large Comon Mead called South Mead 
belonging to the Parish of Cricklade on the left Hand where a Gospel 
was read & a Crosse made at the North East Corner of the said Langett 
last mentioned from thence into a Mead called the Ham the Lands of the 
said Earl of Shaftesbury then into a Ground called the Ham the lands 
of the said Henry Broadway then into a Ground called the long Acres, 
the Lands of the said Earl of Shaftesbury then into a Smal Ham belonging 
to the late Mr. Joseph Hall then into a Ham the Lands of James Long 
Gent, then into a Mead called the Lower Mead the Lands of Mr. William 
Wilkins, then into a Ground called the lower Ground the lands of William 
Bathe Gent, then into a smal Langet and Mead & a Ground called Gamons 
Ground all three the Lands of Mr. Thomas Moulden then into a Ground 

1 The Cox family of Ashton Keynes were for many years lessees under 
the Crown of the Slytield Lodge Estate. 



Transcribed by Mrs. Story Maskelyne. 127 

called Gamons Ground the lands of the late Mr. Dyke then into a Ground 
called also Gamons Ground the Land of Mr. Richard Fannel then into a 
Mead & then turning short on the left Hand into another Mead the land 
of the said Thomas Moulden &, up to the Rivers side called the Rea and so 
on by the River's side till we came to the bridge called Woodward's Bridge 
leaving Queen Ham the Lands of the said John Self in the Parish of 
Cricklade, the Land of the late Keck 1 Esqr. in the Parish of Blunsden 

St. Andrew and a Mead belonging to several persons in Haydon in the 
Parish of Rodbourne Cheyney on the left hand we came to the said Bridge 
called Woodward's Bridge where between the two Bridges a Gospel was 
read and a Crosse made then we came into a Mead called Norths Mead 
then into a Mead called Long Ham's the Lands of the said Earl of Shaftes- 
bury then into a Mead the Lands of Mr. John Herring then into a Common 
Mead called Common Brook Mead then into a Mead called Smalways End the 
Lands of the said IN evil Maskelyne then into a Meadcalled WroughtonMead 
the Lands of the late Mr. Phelps then into two little meads the lands of 
George Clarke Esqr. then into a Mead the lands of the said late_Mr. Phelps 
stil leaving the River on the left hand til we came to the said Comon Mead 
called Brook Mead where the river divides til we came to almost the upper 
End of the said Common Mead. Then leaving both Rivers on the left hand 
and stil leaving the River on the left hand til we came to a Mill heretofore 
called Elvers Mill 2 nowOrchard'Mill where in the Hall thereat the upper End 
of the Table a Gospel was read and a Penny was then i> lid by Orchard the 
Miller (being an Ancient Custom) to the Minister of Purton then we 
crossed the said River at the Mill Taile and went thro two little Meads 
lands belonging to the said Mill then into a Mead the lands of the Rev. Mr. 
Coker 3 up the middle part thereof to Elvers Bridge leaving a Watercourse 
heretofore a River (according to ancient Tradition and the best information 
that can be had) stil on the left hand we came on the said Bridge called 
Elvers bridge where on the East side of the said Bridge belonging to the 
Parish of Purton a Gospel was read and a Crosse cut on the Post there . 
then we came into a Mead called Elvers bridge mead the lands of the said 
Nevil Maskelyne then into two meads the lands of the said late Mr. Phelps 
then into a little mead called the Moor the lands of the said Earl of 
Shaftesbury then we crossed a little Brook or Rivulet into a Mead called 
Brimhil the lands of the said Earl of Shaftesbury about thirty perches up 
to a Meerstone there stil leaving the said River and some lands lying in 
the Parish of Rodbourne Cheney on the left hand where a Gospel was read 

s John Keck died Aug. 1729. His grandfather, Sir Anthony Keck, pur- 
chased the Manor of Blunsdon St. Andrew about 1693 (see Wilts N. Sf Q , 
vi., 314—9). 

2 " Elvers " is evidently a corruption of " Ayleford," William de Ayleford 
being mentioned as tenant of the mill in an Inq. of 11 Sept., 1306 (Malm- 
Reg., ii., 406). Now called Ridgeway Mill. Mr. Akerman in his paper 
{Arch, xxxvii., 304) suggests that "Ayleford" was at Woodward Bridge, 
but this is most improbable. 

3 Rev. Thomas Coker, Rector of Little Hinton (1684—1741). 
VOL. XL. — NO. CXVIII. I 



128 Perambulation of Purton, 1733. 

and a Crosse made then we proceeded in a direct line from the aforesaid 
Meer stone to a Stone Bridge and went over the same into a little Mead to 
the South East corner thereof the Lands of the said Earl of Shaitesbury 
then turning up the Strait West Hedge leaving the lands of the Earl of 
Shaftesbury in the Parish of Liddiard Millicent on the left hand we came 
into the Backside belonging to a Farm called Spressels 1 the Estate of the 
said Earl of Shaftesbury where every Person there present eat Cakes & 
drank ale ; from whence up the said Backside into a pasture ground part of 
the said Farm leaving the Barnes, Stables & outhousing in the said Parish of 
Liddiard Millicent on the left hand and so on up the said Ground in a direct 
line into a ground the land of the said Thomas Bray then into a Ground 
the lands of the said George Clarke then into a Ground of the Reverend Mr. 
Richard Glasse Vicar of Purton stil leaving the Lands of the said Earl of 
Shaftesbury in the said parish of Liddiard Millicent on the left hand then 
into the highway leading to Swindon where a Gospel was read and a Crosse 
made then crossing the said Highway into a ground the Lands of Mr. 
Richard Tuckey then into the Estate of the late Mr. Anthony Goddard 2 
called Longs to the West corner thereof where a Gospel was read and a 
Crosse made leaving the Lands of Mr. Oatridge George Riddle a smal 
parcel of the said Ground called Longs & the Lands of the said Earl of 
Shaftesbury on the left hand then thro a Ground called Free Close the 
lands of Arthur Evans 3 Gent then thro a ground called the Moor and a 
Ground called Hey croft both the lands of the said Earl of Shaftesbury 
leaving the lands of Francis Mundee and the lands of the said Earl of 
Shaftesbury in the said Parish of Liddiard Millicent on the left hand then 
Ave came thro the hedge to the Water in Jobbers Lane where the Peram- 
bulation was completed and so there ended. 



[I am indebted to Canon F. H. Manley for most of the foregoing 
footnotes and other helpful suggestions. T.S.M.] 



1 The extreme S.E. corner of the parish, still called Sparcel's Farm. 

* The owner of the estate now called Purton House and the mill adjoining 
Buried at Purton, 31st Aug., 1725. 

3 The owner of property in Rodborne Cheney, Sheriff of Wilts, 1755, an<j 
guardian of Mr. Anthony Goddard's children. His wife was a daught 
of the Rev. Thomas Coker and his sister Mary was wife of Anthonj 
Goddard. 



129 



WILTSHIRE NEWSPAPERS— PAST AND PRESENT. 

Part II. 

By J. J. Slade. 

Marlborough Journal (1771). 

Outside of Salisbury, which from its ecclesiastical and political 
importance held a unique position in the county, there was only 
one Wiltshire town which possessed an 18th century newspaper, 
so far as we have any record. It was Marlborough. Although 
Marlborough was no mean place at any time in the historical period, 
it might be thought that Devizes enterprise would have been at 
least equal to that of Marlborough, and that there we might expect 
to find the first essay in newspaper publishing in North Wilts. 
The fact is, however, that while Devizes had no newspaper until 
Simpson's Salisbury Gazette was removed thither in 1819, Marl- 
borough had its paper in 1771. The fact that it could not be made 
a financial success, and came to an end in rather over three years, 
does not detract from the credit due to the effort ; it suffered in 
good company. Like its Salisbury contemporary, it was styled 
" Journal " — The Marlborough Journal. Fortunately there exists 
a practically complete file of the paper. Some forty years ago 
Mr. Stephen Neate, of Marlborough, acquired the volume at a sale 
of the effects of a successor to the publisher. He thought that it 
would have a suitable, also a safe, resting place in Marlborough 
College, and when Canon Bell was Master there he first lent and 
then presented it to the College library. The Rev. J. M. Lupton, 
College librarian, has inspected the file for the purposes of this 
article, and the Journal is thus the witness to its own history, which 
after this lapse of time could not otherwise be recovered. 

The first issue in the file is No. 2 of the series, published on 
Saturday, April 5th, 1771. The title is printed in the usual old 
English type, and is flanked on the one side by the figure of 

I 2 



130 Wiltshire Newspapers — Past and Present. 

Britannia and on the other by the Borough Arms, each surrounded 
by a wreath of oak leaves, The imprint is as follows: — 

"Marlborough, printed by J. Smith and E. Harold. 

" * # * Advertisements are taken in at the Printing-Office in 
Marlborough; by T. Longman, bookseller, in Pater-noster 
Bow, and at the Chapter Coffee House, in St, Paul's Church- 
yard, London; E. Ward, Printer and Stationer, in Corn- 
Street, Bristol ; Mr. Tennent, Bookseller, in Milsom Street, 
Bath; T. Borough, Bookseller, in Devizes; D. Stretch, 
Bookseller, in Calne ; Mr. Simpson, in Chippenham ; ll 
Smith, in Swindon; E. Pullen, in Cricklade; S. Rudder, 
and Mrs. Hill, in Cirencester; and by the men who dis- 
tribute this Paper." 

In No. 7 we have evidence that the publishers carried on other 
business besides that of newspaper proprietors, for the imprint is 
expanded as follows : — 

"Marlborough, printed by J. Smith and E. Harold, of whom 
may be had all sorts of Books and Stationery Wares, as 
cheap as in London ; and by whom Printing is executed in 
the most correct Manner, and on reasonable terms." 

At the same time the London agents were added to, the London 
Coffee-house, Ludgate Hill, being named with the others. 

There is an editorial address in which the readers of the Journal 
are promised early intelligence from London, the proprietors basing 
their anticipations of this on not only their. advantageous situation 
(on the main road from London to Bristol), " but likewise from an 
express established for this purpose only between London and 
Marlborough." They " solicit the assistance of men of genius for 
essays and articles of a literary nature, and the correspondence of 
men of business," 

The paper consisted of four pages, with four columns to a page 3 
the size of the pages as bound is 17 inches by 11 J inches, but in 
the course of binding they were appreciably reduced, as the ab- 
breviated margins show — the columns occupy the full length and 



By J. J. Slade. 131 

are 2f inches wide. The proprietors seem to have had " after- 
thoughts" as to advertising the price. " Price Two-pence Half- 
penny" appears upon No. 3 (not upon No, 2), but it drops out on 
No, 53 (for March 28th, 1772) and does not re-appear. 

The contents of the paper resemble generally those of most 
newspapers of the time, " Monday's Post " provides about a column 
of various intelligence, English and foreign. Ireland takes about 
a quarter of a column ; London Letter three-quarters of a column ; 
Wednesday's Post the same ; Friday's Post, two columns (which 
shows that the proprietor tried to be as up-to-date as possible) ; 
another London Letter is half a column. Marlborough did not 
provide much news, or the publishers were not active reporters; 
it was less than a column. Bath was then in its hey-day, and as 
sojourners in that city mostly passed through. Marlborough the 
editor recognized the local interest in them by publishing the 
" Arrivals at Bath." The remainder of the space is devoted to 
Original Poetry, Letters, Answers to Correspondents, advertise- 
ments of books, of patent medicines, and of houses to let, etc. 

A change in the proprietorship occurred in the summer of 1773. 
In the imprint on June 26th of that year (No. 118) Smith's name 
drops out, leaving E. Harold, who refers to the fact editorially, and 
proposes " to devote one corner of his Paper to original Pieces, or 
extracts from new and valuable Publications." The new imprint 
continues to the end, with occasional changes in the list of agents 
for taking advertisements. 

Unfortunately for the proprietor, these agents were not successful 
in securing an advertisement revenue sufficiently remunerative to 
pay the expenses of publication, and the Marlborough Journal (of 
the 18th century) expired on Saturday, July 2nd, 1774 (its 17lst 
number) with the following laconic explanation : — 

" E. Harold thanks the public for their patronage ; finds the expense 
of printing and circulation greater than the profit, and announces his 
intention of discontinuing its publication. In exchange, by arrange- 
ment with R. Cruttwell, printer of the Bath Chronicle, he proposes to 
send that paper instead to his present customers every Thursday." 

The announcement concludes with a commendation of the Bath 
Chronicle. 



132 Wiltshire Newspapers — Past and Present, 

Marlborough Journal (1873). 

It was just about one hundred years later, at the end of June 
or beginning of July, 1873, that another Marlborough Journal was 
issued. Although it was published from the same premises and 
under the same (principal) title as the original, it cannot be de- 
scribed as a re-issue; there was no continuity and of course the 
character of the two papers was entirely different. The full title 
of the later journal was the Marlborough Journal, Hunger/oral 
Gazette, Calne and Pewsey Herald, and General Advertiser for Wilts, 
Berks, and Hants. The borough arms were inset in the title. 
The imprint states: — "Printed (by Gas and atmospheric Power) 
and published by Maskelyne and Co., at their General Printing 
Office, High Street, Marlborough, in the County of Wilts." 

This was an 8-page paper, and six columns to the page, the 
columns measuring 19 inches in length by 2f inches in width. 
Four pages were printed in London ; the four pages printed in 
Marlborough contained a fair quantity of Marlborough news and 
some from other Wiltshire towns and the near district of Berks.. 
The price was one penny. The politics were Liberal, (The 
politics of the original Journal it is difficult to determine.) 

The exact date when this Journal expired cannot be stated. 
The business from which it emanated was that now carried on by 
Messrs. " Lucy & Co.," at No. 132, High Street (in those days Mr. 
William Wootten Lucy carried on business on the other or 
south side). Formerly it was " Emberlin and Harold," and was a 
combination of chemistry, stationery, bookselling, and printing. 
About the "seventies" it passed into the hands of Mr, Maskelyne, 
and he was the first publisher of the new Journal, but it continued 
for a time under Maskelyne's successor, John Lanchenick, who 
took over the business on Midsummer Day, 1875. Lanchenick 
was there until 1876 or 1877, and it was under him that the 
paper was allowed to die, as his successor, Mr, Jarvis, certainly did 
not publish it. The last issue on the British Museum files is dated 
February 15th, 1877, so that, like its predecessor of the same name, 
last century's Journal did not exist longer than four years. It was 
from Jarvis that Mr. Lucy took over the business, crossing the street j 
after the fire destroyed his and other premises on the south side. 






By J. J. Slade. 133 

Marlborough Express. 

Another Marlborough newspaper, was " The Marlborough and 
Hungerford Express." This was started in 186 L by Mr. William 
Cane, who was with Emberlin and Harold and detached himself 
and set up a stationer's shop and printing office of his own — that 
now represented by Mr. T. E. Leadley at INTo. 100, High Street. 
The Express was an eight-page paper of Liberal politics and of the 
character which was usual at that period. It was weekly in 
publication and, like the Journals which preceded and followed it, 
ran for three or four years. The last issue on the British Museum 
files is April 4th, 1863, 

The Marlborough Times. 



The Marlborough Times was founded by Mr. Charles Perkins, 

At that time there were two chief printing establishments in 

Marlborough, viz., those of Mr. William Wootten Lucy, on the 

south side of the High Street, and of Messrs. Emberlin & Harold, 

on the north side. (Mr. Lucy's business was transferred to, and 

absorbed, Messrs. Emberlin & Harold's at the time of the destructive 

I fire on the south side.) It was from Messrs. Emberlin and Harold, 

j that Mr. William Cane detached himself and set up the stationer's 

] shop and printing office, from which, as noted in other connection, 

he afterwards issued the Marlborough Express. Mr. Charles Perkins 

I was chief of the printing staff in the other establishment, and he 

I frequently urged Mr. Lucy to start a newspaper. Mr. Lucy did 

not feel equal to, or did not care to undertake, the enterprise, and 

by and bye Mr. Perkins left him and started the Marlborough 

Times. 

The first number appeared on September 24th, 1859, with the 
title of The Marlborough Times and Hungerford Weekly Advertiser, 
and it was described as "circulating in Marlborough, Hungerford, 
Lambourn, Kamsbury, Froxfield, Avebury, Overton, Great and 
Little Bedwyn, Burbage, Collingbournes, Ogbournes, Pewsey and 
Swindon Vales, and the entire neighbourhood." 

In his inaugural address, the Editor said the journal 



134 Wiltshire Newspapers — Past and Present. 

" will not insult its readers, or prevent its own fair fame and ultimate 
success, by publishing that scurrilous abuse which is a stumbling block 
to the promulgation of true morality. Articles of this character will 
at all times and at all risks be studiously and sternly forbidden to 
pollute its pages, and spread strife and disunion around. It will not 
contain angry and prejudiced ebullitions of party strife, but a faithful 
record of such occurrences in the town and neighbourhood or the more 
distant parts of the kingdom, as may deserve publicity or warn its 
readers. We will venture to promise that truth, fairness, and im- 
partiality shall characterise its pages, that the Marlborough Times will 
seek to uphold the claims of equity, right, justice, and honour in all 
their relations, whether in reference to the State, the family, or the 
individual, and aiming to have a place in the family and an influence 
in the whole town and neighbourhood, its tone shall be cheerful without 
levity, grave without moroseness, moral and religious without sec- 
tarianism or bigotry." 

Although in this opening address there is no reference to party 
politics, as a matter of fact the paper gave support to the Con- 
servative cause during the first twenty-six years of its existence. 
In 1885 it became neutral in politics. 

The publishing house of the paper was Waterloo House, in the 
High Street, and there it has continued. The imprint of the paper 
has never had to be altered, except when the founder died and the 
property passed to his son. The date of issue is not embodied 
in the imprint, being the only case of the kind in a Wiltshire- 
printed newspaper. 

The title has undergone many, almost baffling changes, some of 
its forms lasting only a week or two. The list of places named (as 
part of the title heading) as places where the paper "extensively 
circulated" was added to shortly by the inclusion of Aldbourne, 
Calne, Devizes, Swindon, Woodborough, Wootton Bassett, Baydon, 
and East Garston, On the 20th December, 1862, this long list 
was omitted, and the paper became the Marlborough Times merely. 
On the 7th February following, however, it was back as the Marl- 
borough Times and Hungerford Weekly Advertiser, but after twelve 
months of this form, on January 23rd, 1864, the Hungerford sub- 
title was again dropped. In these years progressive circulation 
was claimed: in March, 1861, the figure was put at 2850, which 
" we believe to be unequalled by any paper in the county"; by 
1862 it was stated to be upwards of 3000 ; in November, 1863, and 



By J. J, Slade. 135 

for a considerable time afterwards, until the feature was dropped 
altogether, the circulation was put at 4000, and at "upwards" of 
4000, " in Wilts and Berks," then " in Wilts and Berks and Hants " 
— -the first reference to the county of Hants being on December 
16th, 1865. 

From November 18th, 1865, until April 22nd, 1871, this statement 
as to the number and area of circulation was made a feature of the 
title, but on the latter date it was abandoned in favour of the 
Marlborough Times and Wilts and Berks County Paper, the editorial 
explanation being : — 

" The Marlborough Times having for some years steadily progressed 
in its importance and circulation, the proprietor has yielded to the 
desire of many gentlemen to identify it by its title more closely to the 
counties of Wilts and Berks, throughout which it circulates very largely." 

On August 26th. 1905, there was added to the title heading the 
declaration that " This journal is the organ of the landowners and 
agriculturists of Wilts, Berks, and Hants." On February 18th, 
1910, the name became the Wilts and Berks County Paper and 
Marlborough Times (the same component parts as before, but with 
the positions reversed). On June 17th in the same year it became 
the Wilts and Berks County Paper and Marlborough, Newbury, 
Hungerford, Andover, Peivsey, and Calne Times. The statement 
as to the paper being the organ of the landowning and agricultural 
classes continued through these variations, but it was dropped on 
July 2nd, 1910. In another month, or August, 1910, there was 
I another modification — to the Wilts, Berks, and Hants County Paper 
; and the Marlborough Times, — this and nothing else. 

There has since then been a further change, and the name of the 
i paper in July, 1917, is as above with the supplement — " withiuhich 
I is incorporated the Andover Times" The Andover Times was an 
\ offshoot, an Andover edition which was printed at the Times Office, 
; Marlborough, but issued from an Andover publishing office for a 
| comparatively short period. 

The paper started with eight pages, and continued with that 
number until war conditions compelled a reduction to six pages. 
Like most other provincial weekly journals started about that time, 



136 Wiltshire Newspapers — Past and Present, 

the sheets were sent from London partly printed, the local news 
being printed locally ; this continued for many years. The earliest 
issues had live columns to a page, the columns being 18-|- inches 
by 2-|- inches. The first enlargement was on June 27th, 1868, when 
the columns were increased in length to 20J inches and the number 
on a page to six. This was stated to be due to " extensive and 
still increasing circulation." On the 23rd August, 1873, the page 
was made one of seven columns of 22J inches, which it was claimed 
made the paper larger than any (other) published in the county 
and to be due to the journal's " unprecedented success." At this size 
it remained until the war reduction, effected in several stages. 
After being for some time a six-page paper, length and width of 
columns as before, it now has four pages, the pages being smaller 
as well as fewer — the effect of restrictions on supplies of paper. 

The price of the Marlborough Times was always a penny until 
early in 1918, when it became \\d. ; in March it advanced to 2d. 

Mr. Charles Perkins, founder of the paper, died on April 20th, 
1899, when he was within a month of his 79th year. The property 
passed by will to his son, Mr. Herbert George Perkins, by whom 
it is still carried on. In the issue following Mr. Perkins' death 
the imprint still bore his name, and the revised imprint appeared 
on April 29th, 1899. 

Mr. Charles Perkins did not occupy public offices, but he was, 
very loyal to Marlborough and zealous for its interests, this loyalty 
and zeal being testified to from various quarters at the time of his 
death. 

The Swindon Advertiser, 

The Swindon Advertiser has made good its claim to the distinction 
of being the oldest-established penny newspaper in Great Britain. 
Its publication was quickly followed by that of others, one of 
them after an interval of a few days, but many of these had only 
a brief existence ; any penny newspapers which existed at an earlier 
date had expired long before. The Advertiser started as a monthly 
newspaper — not magazine — under these circumstances: In January, 



By J. J. Slade. 137 

1854, an action had been brought by the Excise authorities against 
Bradbury & Evans, printers and publishers of Dickens's "House- 
hold Words," the complaint being that that publication included 
"news" in its contents and its publishers had not paid the Stamp 
Duty, which had to be paid for every copy of a newspaper. The 
action had this good effect — it made it clear that a newspaper was 
not a "newspaper" in the eye of the law if it was not published 
offcener than once in twenty-eight days. Mr. William Morris, the 
founder of the Swindon Advertiser, was a man of quick wit and 
prompt in action. " Within a few days after I was made aware of 
this decision," he wrote about 1885, " I determined on publishing 
a monthly newspaper, devoted to the news of Swindon and neigh- 1 
bouring towns and villages," The first number was dated Monday, 
February 6th, 1854, and its full title was The Swindon Advertiser 
and Monthly Record. It had four pages, with three columns on a 
page; the length of a column was 14 inches and its width 3 inches. 
The first two pages were taken up with advertisements; the other 
two were filled with news: it was editorially stated that want of 
room compelled the omission of not only several articles of interest 
but of a number of advertisements also ; therefore, from a business 
point of view the venture had an encouraging start. The editorial 
introduction stated : — 

" We think the character we would have our new periodical [it was 
no doubt with intent that " periodical " was the word selected] assume 
and maintain, is pretty well indicated by the title we have given it. 
But to prevent any misapprehension, we would state, that we shall 
endeavour to make our periodical the best advertising medium for the 
Professional Gentlemen, Tradesmen, and others, of Swindon, Wootton 
Bassett, Highworth, Cricklade, and the neighbourhood, requiring 
publicity given to their professional, trade, or business announcements." 

The writer went on ingeniously to make it known that his 
"Becord" would consist of full and faithful " Reports," but these 
were to be confined to such as "do not partake of a Pol itical, 
Party, or Personal character" — a limitation which was not main- 
tained in after years, certainly as regards political events. More 
than half of the two news pages was absorbed by a lecture given 
by George Dawson, M.A., of Birmingham, on Wellington and 
Napoleon; Brewin Grant's lecture on Secularism, Atheism, and 
Christianity was promised for the next number. 



138 Wiltshire Newspapers — Past and Present. 

The monthly publication continued until June 4th, 1855, but 
after the first issue there were eight pages instead of four. The 
editorial notice as to the compulsory omission of advertisements in 
No. 1 was not misleading as to the popularity of the paper with 
the business community; for in No. b 2 the advertisements again 
took half the space — now twelve columns. The length and width 
of the columns were not altered. 

The change from monthly to weekly issue came in 1855, when 
the stamp duty as such on newspapers was abolished (the impressed 
stamp was retained for postal purposes) and the obstacle to frequent 
publication was removed. The weekly Advertiser was of four, 
pages, but the page was larger than the page of the eight-page 
monthly. There were six columns to a page, and the columns 
measured 18 inches in length by 2 J inches in width. An enlarge-- 
ment came in 1861, when the columns were lengthened. This 
development necessitated the provision of a larger machine for 
printing than had hitherto served the purpose. We do not record 
all the changes in mechanical processes which were made by the 
newspapers of Wiltshire, as every paper had to progress by much 
the same stages, but in the case of the Swindon Advertiser there 
are reasons for mentioning this and other developments. The new 
machine was a "Caxton," the principle of which was that the 
cylinder was sufficiently large to enable its revolution to be con- 
tinuous instead of alternate. The " Caxton" was general in news- 
paper offices of the period, and though it has been long since 
superseded its principle of a continuously-revolving cylinder has 
been re-introduced in late types of machines. One result of this 
installation (and this is the reason for mentioning it) was that 
steam-power became desirable — though not essential, as hand- 
power might be used — to drive the machine, and this being a 
novelty and a mark of enterprise "Printed by Steam Power" 
appeared under the title of the paper. The boiler was one which 
had been made by students in the Great Western Eailway Works 
for driving a road vehicle; the engine was made by the Eailway 
Company; and the water for the boiler was provided in primitive 
fashion. The Wroughton Eoad spring, which (at least, the trough 



By J. J. Slade. 139 

in the wall into which the water formerly ran) was removed a 
year or two ago, was then in use, and the water needed for the 
engine was fetched from the spring in pails. 

The paper continued with four pages until February, 1870, when, 
on the 21st of the month, it was enlarged to eight pages — a bold 
step at that time. There were six columns to a page, the columns 
remaining of the length and width established at the time of the 
last previous enlargement — -21 J inches long, 2 J inches wide. It 
was the intention to make the enlargement on the day of the month 
most nearly corresponding to that of the original issue, but the 
railway delayed the delivery of the new machinery — a two-feeder 
Wharfedale, the first of its kind in the county. 

On the 25th February, 1905, the last (to date) of the series of 
enlargements was made — to twelve pages, six columns to a page, 
the columns measuring 22J inches by 2J inches. A web machine 
— the first of its type in England— was installed at this latest 
enlargement, which coincided with the establishment of the daily 
edition of the paper — The Evening Swindon Advertiser. As with 
other newspapers, the exigencies of the war necessitated a reduction 
in size; at the time of writing (March, 1918) The Swindon 
Advertiser (weekly edition) has six pages, the same width as before 
but the length of columns slightly reduced. 

As to the title of the paper: originally The Swindon Advertiser 
and Monthly Record, when its publication became weekly it became 
The Swindon Advertiser, and North Wilts Chronicle. At the 
same time an illustration of a railway train, emblematic of the 
town of origin, was incorporated with the title. This continued 
until 1861, when a phoenix displaced the railway train ; this fabled 
bird was also an emblem, the occasion for its introduction being 
narrated below. When the enlargement to eight pages was made 
on February 21st, 1870, the title became The Swindon Advertiser, 
Wilts, Berks, and Gloster Chronicle. So it is to-day, but a change 
in the " block " was made at the 1870 enlargement to that which 
now appears — an illustration of the front of the house in Victoria 
Street where the paper is printed and published. 

The original place of publication was at what is now No. 35, 



140 Wiltshire Newspapers — Past and Present. 

High Street (the houses have undergone changes in numbering). 
It continued there until April, 1857, when it was removed to 
JSTo. 10 (old number), Victoria Street — the house which bears a 
tablet recording that it was once the residence of Eichard Jefferies. 
(Mr. Morris had carried on business there before going to High 
Street.) The dwelling rooms of the house were first used for both 
type-setting and machining — not a unique circumstance in the 
early days of provincial journalism ; but, later, works or offices 
were built on the garden ground at the rear, Mr. Morris being his 
own designer and builder. 

The founder of the paper, Mr, William Morris, .was a man above 
the average level of men ; the founders of newspapers required to 
be above the average in those days, when the success of such an 
enterprise depended upon individual ability (business, literary, and 
even mechanical ability) and tenaciousness. He came from a 
family of Herefordshire farmers, but his father enlisted in the 
army, and left it plus the rank of sergeant and minus an arm lost 
in battle. He married a lady whose parents were the last to receive 
the pension granted to the descendants of Sir Cloudesley Shovel], 
Admiral of the Fleet, who lost his life in 1707. This Mr. Morris 
was well-educated, and on leaving the army he became a bookseller. 
William, his eldest son, went to a high school in Bath lload, and 
early became associated with newspapers, having to collect the 
accounts of a news agency carried on by his father for a person 
who forwarded the papers from London. He conducted the 
Advertiser fearlessly ; he had a passion for removing abuses, and 
was so outspoken that his newspaper career had stormy epi- 
sodes. It is said of him that " the foundation of the Advertiser 
was the foundation of anything approaching a Liberal party in 
Swindon, and Liberal principles were advocated by the editor- 
proprietor to the day of his death." His comments upon certain 
proceedings at Coate in 1861, when an ox was roasted on the ice, 
led to an attempt to burn his effigy in Old Swindon Market Square, 
and it was in the next issue after this that the phoenix was defiantly 
embodied in the title of his paper. He bore the brunt of several 
ibel actions and was threatened with more, but £50 represented 



By J. J. Slade. 141 

the " damages " cast against him, though of course he had to lose 
in costs even when the cases went in his favour. He took an active 
part in the public life of Swindon, of which he became the historian. 
Until he issued his "Swindon Fifty Years Ago" the town had 
practically no history such as other towns in the county possessed. 
The work retains its interest to the present and is an illustration 
of how a man who can " see " can make much out of what other 
men will pass without a thought. His interest in archaeology was 
shown also in similar works on Wanborough and South Marston, 
and he issued some books based on his travels in Europe and 
North America. 

Mr. William Morris died in 1891, and since then The Swindon 
Advertiser has been conducted — at first by three sons, then, on the 
death of Mr. W. C. Morris, by two sons, Mr. S. P. Morris and Mr. 
F. A, Morris. Mr. W. C. Morris was somewhat of a sleeping 
partner, he being at that time Surveyor under the Old Swindon 
Board of Health. The editor since the founder's death has been 
Mr. S. P. Morris. Another of the sons, it may be noted, founded 
a paper in the Indian territory of the United States of America, 

The date of the establishment of The Evening Swindon Advertiser 
was January 31st, 1898, It is a four-page sheet, and now (March, 
1918) has the distinction of being the smallest newspaper pub- 
lished in Wiltshire. When Part I. of "Wiltshire Newspapers, 
Past and Present," was issued in the December (1917) Magazine the 
Wiltshire Telegraph (Devizes) was the smallest Wiltshire paper — 
four pages, with twenty columns 17 inches long. The Evening 
Swindon Advertiser, now, is four pages, with in all 17 columns of 
fifteen inches length ; the odd column being placed on the inside in 
the space which ordinarily divides pages 2 and 3, 



[To he continued.'] 



142 



THE LAVINGTON MANUAL (MANUALE AD USUM 
SARUM) MS. XIII., XIV., XV. Centuries. 

By Eustace F. Bosanquet. 

Some seven or eight years ago a small manuscript appeared in the. 
London Sale Booms catalogued as "An imperfect 15th Century 
Missal." It was bought by P. M. Barnard, M.A., the Antiquarian 
Bookseller, and immediately from him by Mr. A. G. W. Murray, 
Librarian of Trinity College, Cambridge, who recognised that the 
MS. was a Sarum Manual. For some years the book lay on his 
shelves, and it was not till 1916 that I was able to convince him 
that it would be more suitable if it joined my small collection of 
books of the Sarum Use. 

Since the MS. has been in my possession I have endeavoured to] 
find out something of its history, and it has been examined by 
several experts, including Sir E. Maunde Thompson, the Eev. Dr. 
H. M. Bannister, and the Eev. Canon Christopher Wordsworth, 
and from their letters and notes I am able to give the following 
description : — 

The manuscript, as it remains to-day, is 6-J-in, x 4 Jin., by about 
lin, thick, and consists of the upper cover, a fly-leaf of the 15th 
century, fifty-nine leaves of the 14th century, six leaves of the 13th 
century, and twelve leaves of the 15th century; several leaves of the 
last gathering have been cut away and, probably, there was also one 
more gathering which, together with the lower cover, is now lacking. 
The upper cover is of oak covered with doeskin, and nailed on to the 
upper side is a strap of red leather, which has a hole at the end where 
some sort of fastening was fixed ; which fitted into a corresponding 
attachment on the lower and now missing cover; the leaves are 
sewn on three twisted leather bands, which pass through holes in 
the cover and are firmly punched into the under side, The 
binding dates from the end of the 15th century, when the MS. in 
its present form was put together. 




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The Laving ton Manual (Manuale ad u'sum Sarum) MS. 143 

Pasted inside the cover is the following notice, apparently written 
about 1867:— 

"This ancient Missal of the 13th century fell from a de- 
lapidated part of the Wall in the Chancel of West Lavingtou 
Church near what had been the receptacle for Holy Water 
some 50 years ago; and was presented by the Eevd. J. Williams 
then Curate to the Incumbent, the Eevd. William MairisD.D " 
The Kev. J. Williams was curate of West Lavingtou in 1817, 
and the Kev. Dr. Mairis, Vicar from 1817 — 1828, so we may pre- 
sume the manuscript came to light just 100 years ago ; but of what 
happened to it between the time of its discovery and its appearance 
in the Sale Rooms there is no information, nor is it known who 
wrote the inscription in the cover. 

The contents of the MS. are as follows: — 

The fly-leaf, which was probably part of the same MS. as Part 
III. (late loth century), contains the latter part of Psalm CXIII. 
and the Antiphon "In paradisum" which might have been useful 
at some time for a procession to the grave, though probably here 
it is only intended as a fly to protect the first leaf of text. 

Then comes Part L, containing the Offices of the Manual, on 
forty-four leaves of thick vellum having seventeen lines to the page, 
measuring 5|in. x 4in., and is apparently the earliest Sarum 
Manual extant; the order of the offices is as follows: — 
Exorcismus Salts. 
Ordo ad cat 'echuminum faciendum. 
Benedictio fontis. 
Baptismus parvnlormn. 
, and a Rubric for Confirmation. 
For MARRIAGE Ordo ad facicnda sponsalia. 1 

[This service omits all mention of banns 
and the usual spousal vows and after the 
collects at the porch proceeds direct to 
the blessing of the ring.] 

1 [The reduced facsimile from Part I., leaf 15, in 14th century writing, 
gives the form for Blessing the Wedding-Ring (Benedictio annuli) from the 
Marriage Service, as may be seen in Missale Sarum, 8vo, Burntisland, 
1861—83, columns 832* 833*] 

VOL XL. — NO. CXVIII. K 



For BAPTISM ^ 



144 



By Eustace F. Bosanquet. 



For 
VISITATION 

of the Sick 



' Or do msitandi infirmum. 
Unction of the Sick. 
Communion of the Sick. 
Benedictiones (in agonia mortis.) 
JAtania (in hora mortis), 
[This includes the names of St. Albau and 
St. Edmund.l 



For the \ (Officium sepulture. 
Burial of the Dead IBenedictio tumuli. 



For 
Pilqrims 



For 

the Departed 



j Benedictio super peregrinos. 
IBenedictio vest'is cruce significate. 

[This last was for Crusaders or Pilgrims 
to Jerusalem.! 



r Officium Mortuorum. 
I Missa dc Bequiem. 
\Missa in die sepulture. 



This is followed by 15 leaves in a larger hand, containing: — 

n _, .,■.-■ (Prefaeiones (decern). 

The Prefaces and Canon of the Mass^ ^ 

I Canon Misse. 

The whole of this Part I., though written in two hands, is 

rubricated by the same hand and dates from about 1330 — 40, 

Then we come to Part II., which is the most interesting part of 

the MS. In order to complete what was wanting in Part I. the 

compiler of the book incorporated six leaves of a 13th century 

missal (or ? manual) containing the four Votive Masses : — 

De Trinitate. 

Votive Be S. Spiritu. 

Masses \De Cruce. 

jQaotidiana de S.Maria (Salve, sancta. parens), 

and on the last page the priest's concluding devotions at the end 

of mass. 

These leaves are written in a very peculiar script that has puzzled 

a good many paleographers, but has been pronounced by Sir E, M. 

Thompson to have been written by an Englishman ; probably a 



The Lavington Manual (Manuale ad usum Saturn) MS. 145 

VQvy old man with a heavy hand ; and to date from about the 
third quarter of the 13th century. 1 

Some of the peculiarities are, the persistent use of the uncial 
"Jfc," with a reversed tail (that is, turning inwards instead of out- 
wards) in the middle of the words ; the curious abbreviation for 
"et" formed of a modified "q" with three curves attached, which 
Sir E. M. Thompson considers to be the scribe's attempt to make 
the modern "&." Another peculiarity is his division of words, 
sometimes even of monosyllables, — e.g., "N" on one line, "on" on 
the next, " t "-— " line," &c. A curious double, decorative " N " and 
some other letters have led some experts to think that the scribe 
was an Irishman ; but though it is possible he may have had some 
Irish MS. in his mind's eye, there appears to be no doubt that the 
hand is English, and that these leaves form one of the earliest 
English (Sarum) liturgical MSS. known. It is much to be 
regretted that only so small a portion of this early MS. remains 
to us. 

The last portion of the book, Part III., was taken from some 
late 15th century missal or dirige book; only twelve of the leaves 
remain, a complete gathering of eight leaves and four others, two 
of which have been re-written ; the rest of the book has been 
either cut away or lost, and the leaves that remain are much cut 
down. 

It is quite probable that the MS. from which these leaves were 
taken was in a dilapidated condition, and just those wanted were 
incorporated with the old book. 

The twelve leaves contain the " Placebo," or Evensong of the 

1 [The passage, here shown in reduced facsimile as a specimen of the 13th 
century script, is a portion of the votive mass of the Holy Ghost (Missa de 
S. Spiritu, "SpiritusDomini replevit orbem terrarum "). See MissaleSarum, 
Burntisland, column 743* ; and cf. Dr. J. W. Legg's edition, 4to, Oxon, 1916, 
p. 385, note 4. The rubrications (indicated here by italics, and now only 
faintly visible) are : " Ps. Exurgat Deus . . . Or(atio) D(eu)s qui corda 
fidelium . . . Lectio actuwn ap{osto)lorum. IN diebus illis'. Cum 
adissent ap(ostoli . . . (Acts, viii., 14—17) G;{adale) Beata gens 
. . . V. Verbo d'ni . . . All(elui)a V. Veni, see sp's. Secundum 
Johannem. /N illo TempoRe Dixit ill's discipulis suis, Si qu | is diligit me. 
(St. John, xiv., 23 foil.).— Chr. W.] 

K 2 



146 By Eustace F. Bosanquet, 

Dead, and the beginning of the " JDirige," or Mattins, ending with 
the 1st verse of its second psalm (Ps. VI., Domine, ne in furore). 

Of the early history of the manuscript one can only write 
problematically. It was, as has been stated above, put together 
from the three MSS., and bound up towards the end of the 15th 
century. Why it was made up in this way, one cannot say; bub 
Canon Wordsworth suggests that the priest of that time requiring 
a small portable manual, that he could take about the parish and 
the outlying districts, put it together from old books he found in 
the Church chest. 

Lavington Episcopi was the Bishop's Prebend from 1254 and 
would, presumably, be supplied with a full series of service books, 
and it is quite probable the Church Manual was too large for 
carrying about, and may have been a fine manuscript, too precious 
to be taken out of doors to a funeral in inclement weather. 

When the printed editions came into use this old MS. would, 
probably, be thrown into the Church chest again, and so may have 
remained there till the time of the Reformation, when all books of 
the old form of service were ordered to be sent to Salisbury, and 
the new use of "Common Prayer" and administration of the 
sacraments and other rites and ceremonies of the Church was 
instituted. 

Why was this old book overlooked ? Was it a mistake or in- 
tentional ? I think we may take it that it was intentional ; and 
the priest, finding it, hid it behind a loose stone so that he might 
be able to bury, even if he could not baptise, his flock according to 
the rites which they were used to. 

SirE. M. Thompson is inclined to doubt the story that the book 
was walled up, as the want of air and damp would have caused 
the vellum to decay ; but the present writer is inclined to think 
that the stone would naturally be a loose one, behind which the 
book lay, in order that it might be easily got at when required, 
and sufficient air would get to it to preserve it ; and again we have 
the distinct statement in the cover, for which there can be no 
reason unless it is true. 

Whereabouts in the Church the exact spot was is not known to 



The Laving ton Manual [Manuals ad usum Sarum) MS. 147 

the writer, as he has not been able to visit West Lavington and 
examine the chancel; but in the Wilts Arch. Mag., xxv., 19, in an 
account of the Church, mention is made of traces of a niche and a 
piscina (which may be the so-called holy water receptacle) in the 
Becket Chapel in the south side of the chancel. 

Canon Wordsworth has noted that injunctions were issued by 
Bishop T. Bentham, in the Coventry and Lichfield diocese, in 1565, 
ordering the clergy to put away all " monuments of idolatry and 
superstition," &c, laid up in secret places, and to do up all manner 
of hollow places in their chancels or Churches; 1 and it may be 
that (supposing the like order was taken for the diocese of Salisbury) 
the niche in which this book was hidden at West Lavington ap- 
peared to be filled in, and so was not hermetically sealed up, at a 
time when enquiry for such things was made by Bishop Jewel or 
any of his successors or their subordinates. 

Liturgical ly the manuscript has considerable interest, and the 
Rev. Dr. Bannister has pointed out several unique features both 
in form and order of the prayers and collects, but the present 
writer does not feel competent to deal with them in an account of 
this sort, and he hopes that in due course the book will be thoroughly 
examined from a liturgical point of view by more learned hands 
than his. 

[In the absence of the author on service Canon Wordsworth has 
very kindly corrected the proofs of this paper. In doing this, he 
has abstained from discussing the exact relation between this 
interesting MS. (which was presumably at one time used locally 
in Wiltshire) and those later books which, upon their title page 
and in their rubrics, explicitly claim the authority of the Use 
of Salisbury. Ed.] 



1 "All manner of idols, which be laid up in secret places in your church 
where Latin service was used, and all manner of books that were used in 
the church : and that you beat down all manner of stones or blocks where- 
upon images were set ; and that you do up all manner of hollow places in 
your chancel or church walls, and that you whitelime your church, and 
make it decent and fair." Bentham's Injunctions, 1565, No. 21, Alcuin 
Club Collections, XVI. (1910), Visitation Articles, iii., p. 169. 



148 



THE BUCKLER COLLECTION OF WILTSHIRE 
DRAWINGS. 



This splendid collection of 690 drawings of Wiltshire Churches, houses, 
and other ancient buildings, in ten atlas folio volumes, 24^in. X I7|in., 
finely bound in russia leather, with the arms of Sir Richard Colt Hoare on 
the sides and back, and lettered " Collections for Wiltshire," were executed 
by John Buckler, F.S.A., the well-known architect and topographical artist 
(b. 1770, d. 1851 ), for Sir R. C. Hoare, and formed one of the chief treasures 
of the Stourhead Library. At the sale of this library by Messrs. Sotheby, 
July 30th — Aug. 8th, 1883, the drawings which form Lot 237 of the catalogue 
of the sale, were bought by the Rev. John Henry Ellis, Rector of Stourton 
1874 — 87, and remained in his possession until his death on Nov. 21st, 1912, 
their existence being forgotten for a generation. On July 13th, 1913, how- 
ever, they appeared amongst the books from " the Library of the late Rev. 
J. H. Ellis and others " to be sold by Messrs. Sotheby, Wilkinson, & Hodge, 
and were bought by Mr. Francis Edwards, bookseller, 83, High St., Mary- 
lebone, ,for ^172, and catalogued by him at £400. They afterwards passed 
into the hands of Messrs. Batsford, of High Holborn, and were widely 
advertised by them early in 19 16 throughout the county for £375. The Wilts 
Archaeological Society was already engaged in an appeal for the purchase 
of the Brooke Collection of Antiquities, then in the market, and it was 
hopeless to attempt to acquire these drawings also at that time. In these 
circumstances, Mr. W. He ward Bell, F.S.A , F.G.S., came forward, not for 
the first time in similar circumstances, and bought the drawings for £350,. 
expressly in order that the collection might not be broken up, and that the 
Wilts Archaeological Society might have an opportunity of becomingpossessed 
of them later on. The committee of the Society at the beginning of 1918 
came to the conclusion, that in view of the probability that it will be con- 
siderably more difficult to raise money for any purpose after the war, it 
would be well at once to issue an appeal for the £350 necessary to enable 
the Society to take advantage of Mr. Bell's generous offer. This was done, 
the appeal, it is interesting to note, being privately printed without cost to 
the Society, by the Rev. B. W. Bradford, Rector of Broughton, near Banbury, 
who possesses the corresponding series of Buckler's drawings of Oxfordshire. 
The appeal was widely circulated throughout the county by the Hon. Sec, 
and in little more than two months the whole sum required was paid in. 
Mr. Bell was paid in full, the expenses of the appeal were provided for, and 
a balance remaining over has been carried to the " Purchase Fund " 
of the Society, which is available for the acquisition of valuable Wiltshire 
objects which may come into the market in the future. For this happy 
result we have to thank Mr. Bell and many other generous donors, not a 
few of whom have helped the Society in several previous appeals. It may 
be mentioned that Mr. Bell undertook that the whole sum received by him 
should be at once invested in War Loan, and this has been done. 



The Buckler Collection of Wiltshire Drawings. 149 

Buckler was an architect, and an authority on mediaeval architecture, as 
well as an artist, and his drawings, which are all in water colour, are at once 
beautifully finished drawings, and, what is of more importance from an 
archaeological point of view, singularly clear and accurate in detail. 

Dating as they do from 1803 to 1811, before the era of Church restoration 
and rebuilding began, they form a unique record of practically the whole of 
the ancient Churches of Wiltshire as they existed a hundred years ago. 
Of these Churches nearly all have undergone the process of restoration, 
involving in almost all instances until recent years, very considerable 
alterations or additions. Many have been completely rebuilt, and nothing 
of the old building remains. Of others the nave perhaps is left whilst the 
chancel is entirely modern. Of others, again, the tower remains while the 
rest of the Church is new. 

Each volume has a pictorial title page, formed of a group of architectural 
fragments, after the fashion of the day. For instance, that of Vol. I. shows 
Salisbury Cathedral, with Stonehenge and Malmesbury Abbey in the fore- 
ground. This volume contains also a page of dedication to Sir R. C. Hoare, 
with a view of Stourhead House, and the Hoare arms. The dedication runs : 
" To Sir Richard Colt Hoare. Baronet, of Stourhead, this Collection 
of Drawings of the Ecclesiastical Antiquities of Wiltshire made under 
his munificent patronage, is with respect and gratitude most humbly in- 
scribed by his much obliged and faithful devoted servant, John Buckler. " 
Vol. I. contains the Deaneries of Amesbury and Wilton. 
„ II. Deanery of Chalke. 
„ III. Deanery of Wylye. 

„ IV. Deaneries of Marlborough and Avebury. 
„. V. Deanery of Potterne. 
,, VI. Deanery of Malmesbury. 
„ VII. Deanery of Cricklade. 

„VTlI.W 7 ith two title pages. Architectural Details. 
,, IX. Antiquities of Salisbury. 

„ X. Ancient Buildings in the County of Wiltshire (other than 
Churches). 
Amongst the buildings which have entirely disappeared since these 
drawings were made are: — Biddestone St. Peter's Church; Fugglestone 
Priory, which is believed to have stood in what is now the kitchen garden 
of Wilton House; Hannington Wick Chapel, apparently a plain little 
fifteenth century building, pulled down civ. 1880 ; the two Malmesbury 
Chapels at Burton Hill and Burnivale (St. Helena's); the Market House 
at Mere; the Bell Tower, the Beauchamp and Hungerford Chapels (in- 
teriors) of the Cathedral, the Arcade of the College de Vaux, the old Guild 
Hall, the old Market House, at Salisbury ; Savernake Lodge ; Spye Park 
House (a Square Classical House, with large portico, which preceded the 
present house, built in 1870) ; the curious tower-like building close to the 
old Manor House at Stanton St. Quintin : Whaddon (a fine Elizabethan 
gabled house) ; and Winterbourne Dauntsey Church, pulled down 1867. 

The following Churches have also been wholly rebuilt : — Alderbury 

(rebuilt 1857); Chicklade (1832) ; Chitterne All Saints (1861) ; Cholderton 

| (1850); Chute (1871): Earlstoke (1880); Easton Grey (1836); Everley 



150 The Buckler Collection of Wiltshire Drawings, 

(1813) ; Fisherton Anger; Fonthill Gifford (1866); Foxham ; Grimstead, 
East, (cir. 1862) ; Highway (1867) ; Hindon (1871) Horningsham (1844) ; 
Kington Langley (1855); Landford (1858); Laverstock (1844); Leigh 
Delamere (1846) ; \f arston Maisey ; Newton Toney (1844) ; Overton (1878) ; 
Semley (1875); Slaughtered (1873); Swallowcliffe ; Wmterbourne Earls 
(1868); Woodborough. 

Of the following the tower of the old Church alone now remains, the 
nave and chancel having been rebuilt : Atworth (rebuilt 1852) ; Hilperton 
(1854); Knoyle, West (1878); Wilsford (near Amesbury) (1840); Woodford 
(1845). 

The chancels alone remain now in the case of the following : — Chitterne 
St. Mary's ; The Leigh (the nave has been re-erected on a new site) ; Sutton 
Veny ; Swindon. 

Other Churches which have been greatly altered : — Brink worth (chancel 
rebuilt); Clyffe Pypard (chancel rebuilt) ; Corsham (central tower removed 
1878) ; Devizes, St. John, of which the previous W. End is shown) ; Enford 
(spire fell 1817 and greatly injured the Church) ; Fonthill Bishops (chancel 
rebuilt) ; Harnham, West ; Hilmarton (tower, &c, rebuilt) ; Kennet, East; 
Lyneham (chancel rebuilt) ; Melksham (central tower moved to W. End, 
1840) ; Nunton ; Stanton Fitzwarren (lengthened at W. End) ; Warminster 
(nave rebuilt, 1887—89) ; Wootton Bassett (enlarged and altered, 1870) ; 
Yatesbury (chancel rebuilt, 1854). 

The two plain Norman arches with a wide pier between them of the 
" middle aisle" of Avebury Church, apparently both on the N. and S. sides, 
are illustrated, but there is no sign of the curious little circular windows in 
the clerestory over them. On the other hand the original N. arcade of 
Wroughton Church is shown as three very similar Norman arches with 
two wide piers, and above them in the clerestory five circular patches of a 
darker colour, apparently indicating plastered-up circular windows of the 
same type as at Avebury. As this arcade has been swept away there is no 
possibility now of proving whether these circular windows existed. The 
patches, however, occupy exactly the positions in which the circular windows 
at Avebury are placed. 

Of the Norman door at Ashley Church it is noted that it was on the N. 
side, and was "Removed to the South side July, 1809." Three views of 
Chapel Plaster (or " Haslebury Chapel ") as it was in 1 809 are given. Boyton 
Church is shown with the S. Chapel unroofed. An interior view of Salisbury 
Cathedral shows the organ on Wyatt's stone screen ; another of the 
Poultry Cross shows a short column surmounted by a sundial in the place 
of the present roof and finial, and one of St. John's Chapel on Harnham 
Bridge shows it in a more complete condition than at present. Two good 
views of Enford Church show it as it was in 1807 before the fall of the spire. 

Of brasses several are illustrated which had disappeared before Kite 
wrote his Brasses of Wiltshire, e.g., an inscription at Alderton to Thomas 
Gore; a brass with the figures of John Hunt and his wife, 1590, with a 
separate inscription to the same, at Ham ; an inscription to Harry Preci at 
Bishopstone(N. Wilts); and an inscription to John Dawnseat VV. Lavington; 
whilst the brass of John Baynton at Bromham shows two more shields than 
are shown in Kite's illustration. 



The Buckler Collection of Wiltshire Drawings. 151 

A View of Bowood shows the front in 1806, before the terraces and Italian 
Gardens were laid out; Kingston House, at Bradford, shows the terraces 
and garden front as they were in 1808 ; three views of Longford Castle 
show the entrance front in 180.% the garden front with one of the round 
towers in course of erection in the same year, and a N. View in 1811. 
Berwick St. Leonard Manor House (removed within recent years and re- 
erected at the Ridge), Wick House, an old house at Chitterne All Saints, 
and many other houses, are well illustrated. 

In the volume of details a long series of the Crosses, the Norman doors, 
Chancel arches, Arcades, and the more remarkable Fonts of the county, 
are given. 

In view of the great interest and value of this collection it has seemed 
worth while for convenience of reference for those who cannot easily 
consult the drawings themselves, to print a somewhat full and detailed 
catalogue of the whole of the drawings here. 

Catalogue of the Buckler Drawings of Wiltshire. 

Aldbourne Church. Altar Tomb on N. side. Buckler. Water col. 1806. 
viii. 35. 

Brass of Henry Frekylton. Buckler. Water col. 

viii. 92. 

Font. 1806. Buckler. Water col. ' viii. 6. 

S. Arcade, with Mouldings. Buckler. Water col. 

1806. viii. 47. 

S. K. view [E. End, Chancel, S. Chapel, S. Transept. 

S. Porch, Tower. Cross and Stocks. Old House, 
N.E. of Uh.]. Buckler. Water col. 1806. iv. 1. 

Alderbury Church. S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, S. Porch, 
Wooden Turret. Old Church pulled down 1857.] 
Buckler. Water col. 1805. i. 8. 

Alderbury, Green Dragon Inn. Chimney piece. Buckler. Water 
col. 1806. viii. 71. 

Alderton (Aldrington) Church, Altar Tomb, N. side of Chancel. 
Buckler. Water col. 1809. viii. 43. 

Brass inscription to Thomas Gore. 

[not mentioned inKite's Brasses.] 
Buckler. Water col. viii. 91. 

— - Font. Buckler. Water col. 1809. 

viii. 22. 

N. Door. Buckler. Water col. 

1809. viii. 67. 

N.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, N. 

Tower, N. Porch.] Buckler. 
Water col. 1809. vi. 20. 

All Cannings Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1807. viii. 13. 

j N.W. view. [W. End, N. Side, N. Porch, and 

Transept, Tower] S.E. view. [E. End, 
Chancel, S. Transept and Porch, Tower. 
House W. of Church.] Buckler. Water cols. 
1807. iv. 23,24. 



152 The Buckler Collection of Wiltshire Drawings. 

Allington Church. S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, Tower, and S. 
Door.] Buckler. Water col. 1805. i. 4. 

Alton Barnes Church. S.W. view. [W.End, S. Side, Chancel, Small 

Building E. of Church.] Buckler. Water 
col. 1807. iv. 25. 

Alton Priors Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1807. viii. 13. 

S.W. view. [W. Tower and Door, Nave, 

Chancel.] Buckler. Water col. 1807. iv. 25. 

Alvediston ("Aston") Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1805. 

viii. 2. 

— — S.W. view. [W. Tower, Nave, S. 

Porch, S. Transept.] Buckler. 
Water col. 1805. ii. 7. 

Amesbury Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1803. viii. 32. 

Niches on N. of Chancel. Buckler. Water col. 

1803. viii. 32. 

N.W. view. [W. End, Nave, N. Transept, Tower]. 

S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, S. Transept, Nave, 
S. Porch, Tower. j Buckler. Water cols. i. 3. 

Amesbury Abbey House. S.W. view. Front. Buckler. Water col. 

1805. [Eng. in " Modern Wilts."] x. 38. 

Anstey Church. N.W. view. [W. End, Nave, N. Transept, Chancel.] 
Buckler. Water col. 1804. ii. 32. 

Ashley Church. N. Doorway and Door. " Removed to S. side July, 
1809." Buckler. Water col. 1809. viii. 67. 

S.E. view. [E. End. Chancel, S. Transept, S. Porch, 

W. Tower. House S. of Ch.] Buckler. Water col. 
1809, vi. 20. 

Ashton Keynes Church. Chancel Arch [Norman]. Buckler. Water 

col. 1810. viii. 64. 

Font, Buckler. Water col. 1810. viii. 29. 

S.E view. [E. end, Chancel, S. Aisle, Nave 

Clerestory, S. Porch, W. Tower]. Buckler. 
Water col. 1810. vii. 1. 

Ashton Keynes Cross and Footbridge. Two other crosses in the 

village [3 drawings]. Buckler. Water cols. 
1810. viii. 82. 

Atworth ["Atford"] Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1808. 

viii. 19. 

N.E. view. [E. end, Chancel, Rood 

Stair Turret ?, Nave, N. Porch, W. 
Tower. Rebuilt 1852, only Tower 
remains.] Buckler. Water col. 
1808. v. 37. 

Avebury Church. Norman Nave Arcade, Elevation. S. Door, Norman. 
Font. Buckler. Three Water cols. 1803. viii. 55. 

N.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, N. Aisle, W. Tower.] 

S.W. view. [W. Tower, S. Aisle, Nave Clerestory, 
S. Porch, Chancel. House E. of Church.] Buckler 
Water cols. 1807. iv. 49, 50. 



The Buckler Collection of Wiltshire Dr divings. 



153 



Axford Chapel. S. Front. 1806. iv. 17. 



Barford St. Martin Church. 



Baverstock Church. 



Altar Tomb and Cadaver. 1 804. viii. 36. 

Font. 1804. Buckler. Water col. viii. 14. 

Sculpture on N. side of Chancel. 1804. 
Buckler. Water col. viii. 36. 

N.W. view. [W. End. N. Porch, N. 
Transept, Chancel, Central Tower. 
Cross in Street] S.E. view. [E. End, 
Chancel, N. Transept, Central Tower, 
Nave.] 1804. Buckler. Water col. 
ii. 1. 



S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, S. Porch, 
W. Tower.] Buckler. Water col. 1804. ii. 4. 



Baydon Church. 



Font. Buckler. Water col. 1806. viii. 6. 

S. Arcade [Norman]. Buckler. Water col. 18C6. 

viii. 47. 
S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, S. Aisle, Nave, S. Porch, 

W. Tower.] Buckler. Water col. 1806. iv. 14. 



Bedwyn, Great, Church. 



Bedwyn, Little, Church. 



Beechingstoke Church. 
Bemerton [Old] Church 



Brass of John Seymour, and Brass Inscriptions 
to Thomas Dogeson, Edward Lord Beau- 
champ, and lloger de Stoke. Buckler. 
Four Water cols. viii. 86. 

Font. Buckler. Water col: 1806. viii. 6. 

Interior, Arcade with Mouldings, Clerestory 
Windows, Door. Buckler. Water col. 
1806. viii. 49. 

N.W. view. [W. End, N. Aisle, N. Porch, 
N. Transept, Tower. Cross in Churchyard. 
Buckler. Water col. 1806. iv. 15. 

Plan of Middle Aisle. Buckler. Water col. 
viii. 49. 

Recessed Arched Tombs (2) in S. Transept 
with Effigy and Cross. Buckler. Water col. 
1806. viii. 35. 

S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, S. Transept, 
S. Aisle, Tower.] Buckler. Water col. 
1806. iv. 15. 

Font. Buckler. Water col. 1806. viii. 6. 
Interior. [N. Arcade, Clerestory and N. 

Aisle Windows.] Buckler. Water col. 

1806. viii. 48. 
S E. view. [E. End, Chancel, S. Aisle, 

Nave, Tower, S. Porch ] Buckler. Water 

col. 1806. iv. 2. 

S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, wooden 
Turret.] Buckler. Water col. 1807. iv. 26. 

, Font. Buckler. Water col. 1803. viii. 32. 

N.W. view. [W. End, wooden Turret, 

Nave, Chancel. Part of Vicarage S. of 

Church.] S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, 

Nave, S. Porch, wooden Turret. Cottage 

W. of Church.] Buckler. Water cols. 1 803^ 

i. 24. 



Modern Wilts] Buckler. 
Water col. 1804. x. 40. 



Biddestone St. Nicholas Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1809. 

viii. 27. 

& Door and Tympanum, Norman. 

Buckler. Water col. 1809. 
viii. 68. 

S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, 

Central Bell Turret, Nave, S. 
Porch.] Buckler. Water col. 
vi. 22. 

Biddestone St. Peter Church. S.W. view. [W. End, Bell Turret, 

Lean-to Building against VV. End, 
S. Side, S Porch. This Church 
was pulled down. The Bell Turret 
exists at Castle Combe.] Buckler. 
Water col. vi. 22. 



154 The Buckler Collection of Wiltshire Dr divings. 

Berwick Basset Church. Brass of Will. Bayly. Buckler. Water i 

col. viii. 94. 
Font. Buckler. Water col. 1807. viii. 13. 

SE. view. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, 

wooden S. Tower.] Buckler. Water 
col. 1807. iv. 36. 

Berwick St. James Church. Chancel Arch, Stone Pulpit, and N. 

Door [Norman]. Buckler. Water cols. 
1805. viii. 73. 

Font. Buckler. Water col. 1805. 

viii. 1. 

S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, S. Chapel, 

Nave, W. Tower.] Buckler. Water 
col. 1805. iii. 26. 

Berwick St. John Church. Effigy in Arched Recess in S. Transept. 

Buckler. Water col. 1805. viii. 40. 
Font. Buckler. Water col. 1805. viii. 2. 

N.W. view. [W. End, Nave, N. Porch, 

N. Transept, Central Tower.] S.E. 
view. [E. End, Chancel, S. Transept,- 
Central Tower.] Buckler. Water cols. 
1805. ii. 2. 



Berwick St. Leonard's Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1804. 

viii. 14. 

S.W. view. [W. End, S. Tower, 

Chancel. A Building N. of 
Church.] Buckler. Water col. 
1804. ii. 3. 

Berwick St. Lednard's Manor House. [Removed and re-erected at 

the Ridge. 1 903. Eng. in 



The Buckler Collection of Wiltshire Drawings. 155 

Bishops Cannings Church. Font, Piscina, and Nave Arcade, Elevation. 

Buckler. Three Water cols. 1803. viii. 
56. 

N.W. view. [W. End, N. Aisle, Nave, 

N. Transept, Sacristy, Tower.] S.E. 
view. [15. End. Chancel, S. Transept, 
S. Porch, Nave, Tower.] Buckler. Water 
cols. 1803. iv. 32, 33. 

Bishopstone, N. Wilts, Church. Brass Inscription to Harry Preci 

[now lost]. Buckler. Water col. 
viii. 83. 

Font [remains of]. Buckler. Water 

col. 1810. viii. 28. 

N. Chancel Door [Norman]. 

Buckler. Water col. 1810. 
viii. 65. 

S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel. Nave, 

W. Tower.] Buckler. Water col. 
1810. vii. 2. 

Bishopstone, S. Wilts, Church. Brass Inscription to John Wykham. 

Buckler. Water col. viii. 83. 

' Font. Buckler. Water col. 1805. 

viii. 2. 

Recessed Tomb in N. Transept, and 

Sedilia in Chancel [two drawings]. 
Eng. in " Modern Wilts." Buck- 
ler. Water col. 1805. viii. 40. 

N.W. view. [W. End, Nave, N. 

Door, N. Transept, CentralTower, 
Chancel, Vestry.] S.E. view. 
[E. End, Chancel and S. Door, 
S. Transept with Annexe at end, 
Tower, S. Porch of Nave. Eng. in 
" Modern Wilts." | Buckler. 
Water cols. 1805. ii. 6. 

Bishopstrow (" Bishopston " in error) Church. N.W. view. [W. 

Tower and Spire, Classical Nave.] 
Buckler. Water col. 1804. iii. 1. 

Blacklands Church. S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, S. Porch, 
Turret.] Buckler. Water col. 1806. iv. 47. 

Blunsdon, Broad, [or St. Leonard] Church. Font. Buckler. Water 

col. 1810. viii. 31. 

. S.E. view. [E. End, 

Chancel, S. Aisle, S. 
Porch, W. Tower.] 
Buckler. Water col. 
1810. vii. 3. 

Blunsdon St. Andrew [or Little] Church. Font Buckler. _ Water 

col. 1810. ym. 29. 

N.W. view. [W. End, 

Nave Chancel.] Buck- 
ler. Water col. 1810. 

! vii. 3. 



156 The Buckler Collection of Wiltshire Drawings. 

Boscombe Church. S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, wooden Tur- 
ret.] Buckler. Water col. 1805. i. 4. 

Bowden House. Buckler. Water col. 1806. x. 15. 

Gateway to. Buckler. Water col. 1806. x. 14. 

Bowerchalke Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1805. viii. 2. 

■ N. W. view. [ W". End, Nave, N. Tower, Chancel.] 

Buckler. Water col. 1805. ii. 28. 

Bowood House. [Front and Orangery before Italian Garden was laid 
out.] Buckler. Water col. 1806. x. 19. 

Box Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1809. viii. 27. 

N.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, N. Chapel, Central Tower, 

N. Aisle, N. Doqr.] Buckler. Water col. 1809. vi. 1. 

Boyton Church. Altar Tomb, and Altar Tomb with effigy [N. and S. 
Sides, three water cols. Eng. in " Modern Wilts."] 
1804. viii. 37. 

Chapel, Looking E, [Tomb, Sedilia, Piscina, E. 

Window.] Looking W. . [Tomb, circular W. Win- 
dow, Arches. Two water cols.}. Buckler. 1811. 
x. 8. 

Font. Buckler. Water col. 1804. viii. 17. 

N.W. view. [W. End, S. Chapel unroofed, N. Tower 

and Door, Chancel.] S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, 
S. Chapel unroofed, Tower.] Buckler. Water cols. 
1804. iii. 2. 

Round W T indow, W. End of S. Aisle. Buckler. Water 

col. 1806. viii. 70. 

Boyton House. S.E. view. Buckler. Water col. 1808. x. 7. 

Bradenstoke " Abbey." Chimneypiece. Buckler. Water col. 1808. 

viii. 75. 

N. view. Buckler. Water col. 1808. x. 20. 

Tiles found [3]. Buckler. Water cols. 1809. 

viii. 79. 

Bradford-on-Avon, Barton Bridge and Barn. Buckler. Water col. 

1808. x. 24. 

Bradford-on-Avon Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1808. viii. 18. 

Panelled Recess in Wall of N. Aisle, and 

Canopied Recessed Tomb in S. Wall of 
Chancel. Buckler. Water cols. viii. 63. 

S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, S. 

Chapel, S. Porch, W. Tower.] Buckler. 
Water col. 1808. v. 1;> 

Bradford-on-Avon, Kingston House. S.W. view. [Garden Front 

showing Terraces]. Buck- 
ler. Water col. 1 808. x. 23. 

Bradford on- Avon, Town Bridge and Chapel. [View of Town be- 
yond.] Buckler. 
Water col. 1808. 
x. 25. 



The Buckler Collection of Wiltshire Drawings. 157 

Bradley, North, Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1808. viii. 21. 

S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, S. Aisle, Nave, 

Clerestory, S. Porch, W. Tower.] Buckler, 
Water col. 1808. v. 21. 

Bramshaw Church, [now in Hants]. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1805. 
viii. 3. 

S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, S. Transept and 

wooden Turret over it.] Buckler. Water col. 
1805. i. 18. 

Bratton Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1806. viii. 9. 

N.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, N. Transept, Central 

Tower, N. Aisle.] S.W. view. [W. End, Nave 
Clerestory, Tower, S. Aisle, S. Porch, S. Transept.] 
Buckler. Water cols. 1806. iii. 37. 

Bremhill Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1806. viii. 8. 

S.W. view. [W. Tower, S. Side, Porch, Chancel.] 

Buckler. Water col. 1806. iv. 27. 

Bremhilham [or Cowage] Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 

1809. viii. 22. 

■ S.W. view. [W. End, wooden 

Turret, Nave, S. Door, Chan- 
cel.] Buckler. Water col. 
1807 (?). vi. 21. 

; Brinkworth Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1809. viii. 23. 

S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, S. Porch, 

W. Tower,] Buckler. Water col. 1809. vi. 2. 

Britf or d Church. Altar Tomb and Canopy. Buckler. Water col. 1803. 
viii. 32. 

. N.W. view. [W. End, Nave, N. Transept, Central 

Tower, Chancel.] S.E. view. [E. End of Chancel 
and N. Aisle, S. Transept, Tower, Nave.] Buckler. 
Water cols. 1803. ii. 5. 

Brixton Deverill Church. S.W. view. [W. Tower, Nave, Chancel. 

House E. of Church.] Buckler. Water 
col. 1804. iii. 3. 

Broad Chalke Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1805. viii. 2. 

i S.W. view. [W. End, Nave, S. Porch, Central 

Tower, S. Transept.] Buckler. Water col. 
1805. ii. 22. 

Broad Hinton Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1807. viii. 11. 

S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, S. Porch, 

Tower. Part of Vicarage W. of Church.] 
Buckler. Water col. 1807. iv. 41. 

Brokenhorough Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1809. viii. 25. 

N.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, wooden Turret, 

N. Aisle, N. Porch. Old House E. of 
Church.] Buckler. Water col. vi. 19. 



158 The Buckler Collection oj Wiltshire Drawings. 

Bromham Church. Baynton Chapel, Interior Looking E. [Tombs, 
Windows, Hoof.] Looking N.W. [Tombs, 
Screens, Arches, Roof.] Buckler. Water cols. 
1806, iv. 30, 31. 

Brass of John Baynton [showing two more shields 

than the figure in Kite's Brasses]; and part of 
Inscription on Brass of Lady St. Amand 
[more than Kite shows]. Buckler. Water col. 
viii. 96. 

Font. Buckler. Water col. 1806. viii. 8. 

N.W. view. [W. End, Nave, Tower, Chancel. Old 

Houses N. and E. of Church.] S.E. view. [E. 
End, Baynton Chapel, S. Porch, Tower,] Buckler. 
Water cols. 1806. i v. 28, 29. 

Brought on G-ifford Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1808. viii. 18 

__ s.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, S. Aisle, 

W. Tower.] Buckler. Water col. 18081 
v. 1. 

Bulford Church. S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, W. Tower, S. 
Door.] Buckler. Water col. 1805. i. 7. 

Burbage Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1806. viii. 9. 

S.E. view. [E, End, Chance], S. Aisle, Nave, S. 

Porch, Tower.] Buckler. Water col. 1806. iv. 3. 

Burcombe, North, Church. S. W. view. [W. End, Nave, S. Tower and 

Door, Chancel.] Buckler. Water com 
i. 29. 

Buttermere Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1806. viii. 6. 

N.W. view. [W. End, wooden Turret, N. Porch, 

Nave, Chancel.] Buckler. Water col. 1806 
iv. 4. 

Calne Church. Interior. Arcade, Elevation. Font. N. Door [three draw 
ings.] Buckler. Water cols. 1803. viii. 50. 

— N.W. View. ( [W. End, N. Aisle, N. Porch, Nave, Tower.]; 

S.E. View. [E. End, Tower, S. Aisle, Nave, S. Porch.] 
Buckler. Water cols. 1803. v. 34, 35. 

Calne Hospital. [Street front.] 1806. iv. 47. 

Calstone Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1806. viii. 8. 

N.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, N. Porch 

Tower.] Buckler. Water col. 1806. iv. 45. 

Castle Combe Church. Altar Tomb with effigy in recess. Buckler 

Water col. 1 809. viii. 44. 

Font. Buckler. Water col. 1809. viii. 24 

S.E. view. [Chancel, S. Aisle, Nave Clerestory 

W. Tower.] Buckler. Water col, 1809. vi.3 



Chi 



Castle Combe Market Cross. N.W. [With Stocks, and Old Houses 

Buckler. Water col. 1809. vi. 3. 



Ciiei 



The Buckler Collection of Wiltshire Drawings. 159 

Castle Eaton Church. Font. Buckler. Water colour. 1810. viii. 20. 

S. Door [Norman]. Buckler. Water col. 1810. 

viii. 65. 

S.E.view. [E.End, Chancel, Bell Turret, Nave, 

S. Porch, W. Tower.] Buckler. Water col. 
1810. vii. 4. 

Chalfield, Great, Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1808. viii. 19. 
N.W. view. [W. End, Door and Turret, 

Nave, S. Transept. Bastion of Old Wall 

on N. side of Churchyard.] Buckler. 

Water col. 1808. v. 22. 
— - Stone Screen. Buckler. Water col. 1808. 

viii. 76. 

Chalfield, Great, House. N.W. view. [Front complete.] Buckler. 

Water col. 1808. x. 11. 

Chapel Plaister, " Haslebury Chapel." N.E. view; S.W. view; W. 

End Doorand LampNiche 
inside Porch. Buckler. 
Three Water cols. 1809. 
vi. 11. 

Charlton [in Donhead St. Mary] Chapel. Font. Buckler. Water 

col. 1804. viii. 16. 

_ S.W. view. [W. Tower, 

Nave, S. Porch, Chan- 
cel.] Buckler. Water 
col. 1804 (?). ii. 32. 

Charlton (near Malmesbury) Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 

1809. viii. -26. 

N. Nave Arcade. Buckler. 

Water col. 1809. viii. 59. 

S.E.view. [E. End, Chancel, 

Nave, S. Porch, W. Tower. 
House W. of Church.] 
Buckler. Water col. 1809. 
vi. 10. 

Charlton (near Malmesbury) House. [Entrance Front and Side. 

Buckler. Water col. 1809.] 
x. 28. 

Charlton (Pewsey Vale) Church. Brass to Will Chaucey. Buckler. 

Water col. viii. 84. 

Font. Buckler. Water col. 1807. 

viii. 12. 

N.W. view. [W. End, Nave, S. 

Tower and Door, S. Chapel of 
Chancel.] Buckler. Water col. 
1807. v. 12. 

Cherhill Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1806. viii. 10. 

S.E. view. [E. End, S. Aisle, S. Porch, Tower. House 

W. of Church. Buckler. Water col. 1806. iv. 37. 

VOL. XL. — NO. CXVIII. L 



160 The Buckler Collection of Wiltshire Draioings. 

Ch ever ell, Great, Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1807.-viii.il. 

■ - — S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, S. 

Porch, W. Tower.] Buckler. Water cot. 
1807. v. 2. 

Cheverell, Little, Church. S.W. view. [W. Tower and Door, Nave, 

S. Porch, Chancel.] Buckler. Water col. 
1807. v. 2. 

Chicklade Church. S.W. view. [W. End, Turret, Nave, S. Door, 
Chancel. The Church was rebuilt 1 832.] Buckler. 
Water col. 1 804. ii. 30. 

Chilmark Barn. N.E. view. Buckler. Water col. 1804. iii. 17. 

Chilmark Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1804. viii. 14. 

N. Door [Norman]. Buckler. Water col. 1806. 

viii. 70. 

N.W. view. [W. End, Nave, N. Transept, Central 

Spire.] S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, S. Transept, 
Spire, S. Porch] Buckler. Water cols. 1804. 
ii. 8. 

Chilton Foliat Church. N.E. view. [Chancel, Nave, Tower.] Buckler. 

Water col. 1806. iv. 2. 

Chippenham Church. Chancel Arch [Norman], Buckler. Water col. 

1808. viii. 69. 

Font. Buckler. Water col. 1808. viii. 19. 

N. Chancel Door. Buckler. Water col. 1808. 

viii. 75. 

S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel and S. Chapel, 

Nave, S. Aisle, W. Tower.] Buckler. Water 
col. 1888. vi. 24. 

Chirton (Cherington) Church. Nave Arcade. Buckler. Water col. 

1807. viii. 46. 

Font. Buckler. Water col. 1807. 

viii. 13. 

S. Doorway and Door. Buckler. 

Water col. 1807. viii. 72. 

S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, S. Aisle, 

S. Porch, W. Tower. Buckler. 
Water col. 1807. v. 23. 

Chisbury (in Bedwyn) Chapel. S.E. view. Buckler. Water col. 

1806. iv. 17. 

Chiseldon Church. Altar Tomb. Buckler. Water col. 1806. viii. 35. 

Brass of Fnncis Rutland. Buckler. Water col. 

viii. 91. 

S.E. View [E. End, Chancel, S. Aisle, Nave, Tower, 

S.Door.] Buckler. Water col. 1806. iv. 11. 

Chitterne All Saints Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1805, 

viii. 1. 

S.E. View. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, 

S. Porch, W. Tower. Present 
Church was built 1861.] Buckler, 
Water col. 1805. iii. 27. 



The Buckler Collection of Wiltshire Drawings. 161 

Chitterne All Saints Old House. W. k S. Views. Buckler. 

Water cols. 1805. x. 39. 

Chitterne St. Mary's Church. Altar Tomb in recess on N. side 

Chancel. 1805. viii., 39. 

Font. Bucker. Water col. 1805. 

viii. 1. 

S.E. View. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, 

S. Tower. Part of house N. of 
Church. Only the Chancel re- 
mains.] Buckler. Water col. 
1805. iii. 27. 

Cholderton Church. S.W. View. [W. Porch, Nave, Chancel. De- 
stroyed 1850, when new Church was built] 
Buckler. Water col. 1805. i. 5. 

Christian Malford Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1808. viii. 20. 

S.E. View. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, S. 

Porch, W. Tower. House N. of Church.] 
Buckler. Water col. 1808. vi. 4. 

Christian Malford Cross. Buckler. Water col. 1808. viii. 81. 

Chute Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1806. viii. 9. 
S. E. View. [Chancel Classical E. Window, S. Tran- 
sept., S. Porch, wooden Turret at West End. De- 
stroyed 1871, when new Church was built.] 
Buckler. Water col. 1806. iv. 5. 

Clarendon Palace. [Ruins of Wall] Buckler. Water col. 1805. x. 2. 

Clyffe Pypard Church. Brass of Quintin. Buckler. Water col. viii . 

99. 

S.E. View. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, S. Porch, 

W. Tower.] Buckler. Water col. 1807. 
iv. 38. 

Codford St. Mary Church. Canopied Tomb on S. side of Chancel. 

Buckler. Water col. 1804. viii. 38. 

Chancel Arch. Buckler. Water col. 

1806. viii. 70. 

Font. Buckler. Water col. 1804. viii. 

17. 

N.E. View. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, 

Tower.] S W. View. [W. Tower, S. 
Porch, Nave, Chancel.] Buckler. Water 
col. 1804. iii. 4. 

Codford St. Peter Church. Chancel arch (Norman) and two Squints, 
Sedilia. Buckler. Two Water cols. 1804. viii. 57. 

Font. Buckler. Water col. 1804. viii. 17. 

N.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, Tower. Part of 

House W. of Church.] S.W. view. [W. Tower, Nave, 
S. Porch, Chancel.] Buckler. Water cols. 1804. iii. 5. 

L 2 



162 The Buckler Collection of Wiltshire Drawings, 

Colerne Church. Aumbry, Piscina, Sedilia, Recess on S. Side Chancel. 
Buckler. Water cols. 1809. viii. 79. 
- — Font. Buckler. Water col. 1809. viii. 27. 

S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, S. Aisle, Nave Clerestory, 

S. Porch, W. Tower. Mouse W. of Church.] Buckler. 
Water col. 1809. vi. 5. 

Collingbourne Ducis Church. S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, 
S. Porch, Tower.] Buckler. Water col. 1806. iv. 6. 

Collingbourne Kingston Church. Brass of Johanna Darell. Buckler. 
Water col. viii. 82. 

Column. Buckler Water col. 1806. viii. 10. 

. — — Font. Buckler. Water col. 1806. viii. 9. 

■ S.W. view. [W. Tower, S. Aisle, Nave, Classical Cleres- 
tory, S. Porch, Chancel.] Buckler. Water col. 1806. 
" iv. 6. 

Combe Bisset Bridge. Buckler. Water col. 1805. ii. 11. 

Combe Bisset Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1805. viii. 3. 

N.E. view. [Church and Bridge, E. End, Chancel, N. 

Transept, N. Aisle, S. Tower.] S.W. view. [W. End, 
S. Aisle and Nave Clerestory, S. Porch, S. Tower.] 
Buckler. Water cols. 1805. ii. 29. 

Compton Bassett Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1806. viii. 8. 

N.E. View. [Chancel, N. Aisle, Nave, N. Porch, Tower.] 

Buckler. Water col. 1806. iv. 39. 

Stone Screen, Columns of Nave Arcade. Buckler. Water 

col. 1806. viii. 78. 

Compton Chamberlayne Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1804. 
viii. 16. 

N.W. view. [W. End, Nave, N. Transept.] S.E. view. 

[E. End, Chancel, S. Transept, S. Tower.] Buckler. 
Water cols. 1804 (?). ii. 31. 

Corsham Church. Altar Tomb. Buckler. Water col. 1809. viii. 43. 

Font. Buckler. Water col. 1809. viii. 27. 

Interior, N. Nave Arcade, Norman. Buckler. Water 

col. 1809. viii. 62. 
■ N. Door, Norman. Buckler. Water col. 1809. viii. 68. 

S.W. view. [W. End, Nave Aisle, S. Porch, Central Tower 

and Spire, Chancel Aisle.] Buckler. Water col. 1809. 
vi. 25. 

Stone Screen. Buckler. Water col. 1809. viii. 77. 

Corsham House. Entrance Front, and N.E. view. Buckler. Two Water 
cols. 1809. x. 26, 27. 

Corsham. Hungerford Alms Houses. N.W. view. Buckler. Water 
col. 1809. vi. 26. 

Corsham. Red Lion Inn. N. view. Buckler. Water col. 1809. 
vi. 26. 

Stained Glass Coat of Arms. Buckler. Water col. 1809. 

viii. 79. 



The Buckler Collection of Wiltshire Drawings. 163 

Corsley Church. S.W. view. [W. Tower, Nave, S. Porch. Chancel.] 
Buckler. Water col. 1804 (?). iii. 28. 

Corston Church. S.E. view. [E. End, S. Side, S. Porch, Bell Turret.] 
W. view. [VV. End, Bell Turret, 8. Porch.] Buckler. 
Water cols. 1809. vi. 32. 

Coulston, East, Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1807. viii. 11. 

N.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, N. Transept, wooden 

Turret.] Buckler. Water col. 1807. v. 3. 
■ S. Door, Norman. Buckler. Water col. 1807. viii. 72. 

Cricklade. Cross in Street. [Now in St. Sampson's Churchyard.] 
Buckler. Water col. 1810. viii. 82. 

Cricklade St. Mary Church. Chancel Arch [Norman]. Buckler. 
Water col. 1810. viii. 64. 

Font. Buckler. Water col. 1810. viii. 30. 

S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, S. Aisle, S. Porch. Cross in 

Churchyard.] Buckler. Water col. 1810. vii. 18. 

Cricklade St. Mary. Cross in Churchyard. Buckler. Water col. 

1810. viii. 82. 

Cricklade St. Sampson Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1810. 
viii. 30. 

Interior. [Roof, part of Tower, Screen.] Buckler. Water 

col. 1810. vii. 7. 

N.W. view. [W. End, N. Aisle, N. Transept, Central 

Tower.] S.E. view. [K End, Chancel, S. Chapel, S. 
Transept, Central Tower, Nave, S. Door.] Buckler. 
Water cols. 1810. vii. 5, 6. 

Recessed Canopied Tomb, in N. Aisle. Stone Coffin dug 

up in Churchyard, 1806. Buckler. Water cols. 1810. 
viii. 33. 

Drudwell Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1809. viii. 26. 

N. Doorway [Norman] and Door. Buckler. Water col. 

1809. viii. 67. 

\ S.W. view. TW. End, W. Tower, S. Aisle, S. Porch.] 

Buckler. Water col. 1809. vi. 6. 

Damerham Church. S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, S. Tower, with 
wooden top, S. Poreh. Cross in Churchyard.] Buckler. 
Water col. 1805. ii. 9. 

Dauntsey Church. Altar Tomb, N. Side of Chancel. Buckler. Water 
col. 1809. viii. 43. 

■ Brasses of Ann and Sir John Danvers. Buckler. Two 

Water cols. viii. 87, 88. 

Font. Buckler. Water col. 1809. viii. 23. 

S. Door. Buckler. Water col. 1809. viii. 66. 

S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, S. Aisle, S. Porch, W. Tower.] 

Buckler. Water cols. 1809. vi. 2. 

Dean, "West, Church. Brass of George Evelyn. Buckler. Water col. 
viii. 89. 

Font. Buckler. Water col. 1808. viii. 3. 

S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, S. Aisle, S. Porch, wooden 

Turret. Large House S. of Church.] Buckler, Water 
col. 1805. i. 8. 



164 The Buckler Collection of Wiltshire Drawings. 

Devizes, St. James' Chapel (Southbroom Church). S.W. view. 
[W. Tower, S. Aisle. S. Porch.] N.E. view. [E. End, 
N. Aisle, W. Tower.] Buckler. Water cols. 1803. 
v. 32, 33. 

Devizes, S. John's Church. Interior, E. End. Plan of Tower and E. 
End. Buckler. Two Water cols. 1802 (?). v. 29. 

N.E. view. [E. End of Chancel and S. Chapel, N. Chapel, 

N. Transept, Central Tower, Nave, N. Porch.] S.W. 
view. [W. End, S. Aisle, S. Porch, Central Tower, S. 
Transept, S. Chapel.] Buckler. Water cols. 1802 (?). 
v. 27, 28. 

Devizes, S. Mary's Church. S.W. view. [W. Tower, S. Aisle, Nave 
Clerestory, S. Porch, Chancel] N.E. view. [E. End, 
Chancel, N. Aisle, Nave Clerestory, Canopy and Statue 
of B.V.M., W. Tower.] Buckler. Water cols. 1803. 
v. 30, 31. 

Dilton Chapel. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1806. viii. 9. 

- — S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, S. Porch, W. Turret 

and Spire.] Buckler. Water col. 1806. iii. 19. 

Dinton Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1804. viii. 16. 

N.W. view. [W. End, Nave, N. Porch, Central Tower, N. 

Transept, Chancel.] S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, 
Central Tower, S. Transept, Nave.] Buckler. Water 
cols. 1804. ii. 12. 

Ditteridge Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1809. viii. 27. 

S. Door [Norman]. Buckler. Water col. 1809. viii. 69. 

- S.W. view. [ W. End, Nave, S. Porch, Bell Cot, Chancel.] 

Buckler. Water col. 1809. vi. 1. 

„ — Stairs to Rood Loft 1 and Window in N. Wall. Buckler. 

Water col. 1809. viii. 79. 

Donhead St. Andrew's Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1804. 
viii. 16. 

N.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, N. Aisle, W. Tower. House 

W. of Church.] S.W. view. [W. Tower, Nave, S. Porch, 
S. Transept, Chancel.] Buckler. Water cols. 1804. 
ii. 13. 

Donhead St. Mary's Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1804. 
viii. 16. 

S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, S. Aisle, Nave Clerestory, 

S. Porch, W. Tower.] S.W. view. [Tower, S. Aisle, 
Clerestory, S. Aisle ot Chancel.] Buckler. Water col.. 
1804. ii. 14. 

Downton Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1805. viii. 3. 

N.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, N. Transept, Tower.] 

S.W. view. [W. End, S. Aisle, S. Porch, S. Transept, 
Tower. Churchyard Cross.] Buckler. Water cols. 
1801 (?). i. 21. 

Downton, Cross, and two Busts in the front of a house opposite the 
Cross. Buckler. Two Water cols. 1801. i. 22. 



The Buckler Collection of Wiltshire Drawings. 165 

Dray cot Cerne Church. Brass of Sir Ed. Cerne. Buckler. Water col. 
viii. 97. 

Effigy in Canopied Recess in Chancel. Buckler, Water 

col. 1808. viii. 76. 

Font. Buckler. Water col. 1808. viii. 20. 

S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, S. Porch, W. Tower.] 

Buckler. Water col. 1808. vi. 7. 

Durnford, Gt., Church. Chancel Arch, Font, N. and S. Uoors. Buckler. 
Four Water cols. 1805. viii. 74. 

N.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, N. Porch, Tower.] 

Buckler. Water col. 1805. i. 6. 



Durrington Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1805. viii. 5. 

N.W. view. [W. End, Tower, Nave, Chancel.] Buckler. 

Water col. i. 17. 

Durrington. Cross, [and Old House near.] Buckler. Water col. 1805. 
x. 5. 

Earlstoke Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1807. viii. 11. 

N.W. view. [W. Tower, Nave, N. Door, N Transept, 

Chancel. This Church is entirely destroyed.] Buckler. 
Water col. 1807. v. 36. 

Earlstoke. "Stoke Park House." Buckler. Water col. 1807. x. 18. 

Easton Grey Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1809. viii. 25. 

S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, S. Porch, W. Tower. 

This Church destroyed 1836.] Buckler. Water col. 
1809. vi. 27. 

Easton Royal Church. N.E. view. [E. End, N. Side, N. Porch, Turret. 
House W. of Church.] Buckler. Water col. 1806. 
iv.7. 

Ebbesborne Wake Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1805, viii. 2. 

S.W. view. [W. Tower, Nave, S. Porch, Chancel.] 

Buckler. Water col. 1805. ii. 7. 

Edington Church. Canopied Recess on Exterior of N. Side. Buckler. 
Water cols. 1807. Title of v. ; viii. 41. 

S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, S. Transept, Central 

Tower, S. Aisle, Nave Clerestory, S. Porch.] N.W. 
view. [W. End, N. Aisle, Nave Clerestory, Tower, N. 
Transept, Chancel. Remains of ruined walls N. of 
Church.] Buckler. Water cols. 1807. v. 34, 35. 

Eisey Chapel. N.W. view. [W. End, S. Porch, Nave, Chancel.] Buckler. 
Water col. 1810. vii. 18. 

fnford Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1807. viii. 12. 
Piscina in N. Aisle, Norman Arcade. Buckler. Two Water 

cols. 1807. viii. 46. 

S.E. view. E. End, Chancel, S. Aisle, Nave Clerestory, 

S. Porch, W T . Tower and Spire. Cross Base in Church- 
yard. The spire fell and destroyed much of the Church 
in 1817.] N.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Sacristy, N. 
Aisle, W. Tower, and Spire.] Buckler. Water cols. 
1807. v. 4, 5. 



166 The Buckler Collection of Wiltshire Drawings. 

Etchilhampton (" Ashlington ") Church. N.W. view. [W. End 

and Turret, N.W. Buttress, N. Side.] Buckler. Water 
col. 1806. iv. 37. 

Everley Church. S.E. view. [E. End, Chance], Nave, S. Porch, Tower. 
House W.of Church. This Church was destroyed 1813.] 
Buckler. Water col. iv. 7. 

Fax-ley Church. S.E. view. ("E. End, Chancel, Nave, S. Transept, 
Tower.] Buckler. Water col. 1805. i. 9. 

Pifield (near Marlborough) Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 
1807. viii. 13. 

S.E. view. [Chancel, Nave, S. Porch, Tower.] Buckler. 

Water col. 1807. iv. 36. 

Pifield Bavant Church. S.W. view. [W. End, S. Side.] Buckler. 
Water col. 1805. ii. 28. 

Figheldean Church. S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, S. Aisle, Nave 
Clerestory, S. Porch, Tower.] Buckler. Water col. 
1805. i. 7. 

Fisherton Anger, see Salisbury. 

Fisherton de la Mere Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1804. 
viii. 17. 

■ N.E. View. [E. End, Chancel, N. Porch.] S.W. view. 

[W. End, Nave, S. Tower with wooden top, Chancel. 
Church rebuilt 1833. Only Tower remains.] Buckler. 
Water cols. 1804. iii. 29. 

Fittleton Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1805. viii. 5. 

S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, S. Aisle, Nave Clerestory, 

S. Porch, W. Tower and Spire.] Buckler. Water cols. 
1801. v. 6. 

Fonthill Bishop's Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1804. viii. 14. 

S.E. view. E. End, Chancel, S. Transept, Central Tower, 

S. Porch. Chancel rebuilt 1871.] Buckler. Water col. 
ii. 15. 

Fonthill Gifford Church. [Classical with large Portico. New Church 
built 1866.] Buckler. Water col. ii. 16. 

Fonthill House. Buckler. Water col. 1806. x. 44. 

Fovant Church. Altar Tomb. Buckler. Water col. 1804. viii. 36. 

Font. Buckler. Water col. 1804. viii. 16. 

N.W. view. [W. Tower and Door, N. Aisle.] S.E. view. 

[E. End of Chancel and S. Aisle, S. Aisle of Nave, S. 

Porch, W. Tower.] Buckler. Water cols. 1804. ii. 17. 

Foxham Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1 806. viii. 8. 

S.E. view. [E. End, S. Side, Two Doors, S. Porch, wooden 

Turret. The Church has been rebuilt.] Buckler. 
Water col. 1806. iv. 27. 



The Buckler Collection of Wiltshire Drawings. 167 

Poxley Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1809. viii. 25. 

S.E. view. [E. End, N. Transept, S. Side Nave, S. Porch, 

W. Tower. House W. of Church.] Buckler. Water 

col. 1809. vi. 28. 

Fr ox fie Id Almshouses. S.W. view. [S. Front and W. Side.] Buckler. 
Water col. 1806. iv. 16. 

Froxfield Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1806. viii. 6. 

■ S.E. view. [Chance], two East Windows, Nave, S. Porch, 

wooden Turret. House N. of Church.] Buckler. 
Water col. 1806. iv. 16. 

Fugglestone Church. Interior. [S. Arcade, W. End with supports of 
Turret.] N.W. view. [W. End and Turret, Nave, 
Chancel.] S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, S. 
Porch, Turret.] Buckler. Three Water cols. 1803. 
i. 23. 

Fugglestone Priory. N. W. view. Buckler. Water col. 1803. i. 23. 

Garsdon Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1809. viii. 23. 

S.E. view. [E. End, Chance), Nave. S. Porch, W. Tower.] 

Buckler. Water col. 1809. vi. 8. 

Grimstead, East, Church. N.E. view. [E. End, Nave, Chancel, N. 
Porch.] Buckler. Water col. 1805. i. 10. 

Grimstead, West, Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1805. viii. 3. 

S.E. view. [E. End, S. Aisle, Tower.] Buckler. Water 

col. 1805. i. 10. 

Grittleton Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1809. viii. 24. 

S.W. view. [W. Tower, Nave, S. Porch, Chancel] Buckler. 

Water col. 1809. vi. 9. 

Ham Church. Brass to John Hunt and wife. Inscription to the same, 
1590. [Not mentioned in Kite's Brasses.] Buckler. 
Two Water cols. viii. 90. 
. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1806. viii. 6. 

N.E. view. [E.End, Chancel, Nave, N. Porch, Tower.] 

Buckler. Water col. 1806. iv. 4. 

Hankerton Ciiurch. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1809. viii. 26. 

Interior. [N. Nave Arcade and N. Aisle.] Buckler 

Water col. 1809. viii. 59. 

S. Doorway and Door. Buckler. Water col. 1809. 

viii. 66. 

S.E. view. [E. End of Nave and N. Aisle, No Chancel, 

Nave, S. Porch, W. Tower.] Buckler. Water col. 1809. 
vi. 10. 

Hannington Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1810. viii. 31, 

__ — S. Door [Norman], Buckler. Water col. 1810. viii. 65. 

S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, S. Porch, \V. Tower.] 

Buckler. Water col. 1810. vii. 9. 

VOL. XL. — NO. CXVIII. M 



168 The Buckler Collection of Wiltshire Drawings. 

Hannington Wick Chapel. S.E. view. [E. End, S. Side, S. Porch, 
Bell Cot.] Buckler. Water col. 1810. vii. 9. 

Hardeuhuish Church. S E. view. [E. End, S. Side, Tower.] Buckler. 
Water col. 1808. vi. 23. 

Harnham Church. N E. view. [E. End of Chancel and S. Chapel, 
Chancel, Nave, N. Tower and Door.] S. W. view. [W. 
End, Nave, S. Door, S. Chapel, Chancel.] Buckler. 
Water cols. 1803. ii. 35. 

Harnham, West, Ancient Building. Buckler. Water col. 1803. i. 26. 

Harnham. See also Salisbury. 

Haselbury Chapel. See Chapel Plaister. 

Heddington Church. N.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, N. Aisle, Nave 
Dormers, N. Porch, Tower.] Buckler. Water col. 
1806. iv. 40. 

Heytesbury Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1804. viii. 15. 

S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, S. Transept, Central Tower. 

S. Aisle, S. Porch, Nave Clerestory.] N.W. view. [W. 
End, N. Aisle, Nave Clerestory, Tower, N. Transept, 
Chancel] Buckler. Water cols. 1804. iii. 24, 25. 

Highway Church. Font. Buckler, Water col. 1806. viii. 7. 
S.E. view. |E. End, S. Side, S. Porch. Church was re- 
built 1867.] Buckler. Water col. 1806. iv. 48. 

Highworth Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1810. viii. 31. 

Norman Tympanum "on E. side of small room over 

Porch." Buckler. Water col. 1810. viii. 33. 

S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, S. Aisle of Chancel, S. 

Transept, S. Porch, S. Aisle, W. Tower.] S.VV. view. 
[W. Tower, S. Aisle, S. Porch, S. Transept.] Buckler. 
Water cols. 1810. vii. 19, 20. 

Hill Deverill Church. Altar Tomb. Buckler. Water col. 1804. viii. 36. 

S.VV. view. [W. End, Bell Cot, Nave, S. Porch, Classical 

Chancel.] Buckler. Water col. 1804. iii, 6. 

Hilmarton Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1806. viii. 7. 

Recess in wall of N. Aisle. Buckler. Water col. 1806. 

viii. 10. 

S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, S. Porch, W. Tower.] 

Buckler. Water col. 1806. iv. 39. i 

Hilperton Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1808. viii. 21. 

S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, S. Porch. Church 

rebuilt except Tower in 1854.] Buckler. Water col. 
1808. v. 22. 

Hindon Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1804. viii. 14. 

S.VV. view. rW. End, Nave, S. Tower, S. Transept 

Chapel 1 Chancel. Steps of Cross in Street S. of 
Church ; a Cottage apparently in Churchyard S. of 



The Buckler Collect ion of Wiltshire Drawings. 169 

Church ; Cottages N. and S. of Church. Church 
destroyed and new Church built, 1871.] Buckler. 
Water col. 1840, ii. 3. 

Hinton, Little, Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1810. viii. 28. 

Interior, N. and 8. Nave Arcades [Norman.] Buckler. 

Water col. 1810. viii. 58. 

S. Door [Norman]. Buckler. Water col. 1810. viii. 64. 

S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, S. Aisle, Nave, Clerestory, 

S. Porch, W. Tower.] Buckler. Water col. 1810. vii. 10. 

Holt Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1808. viii. 18. 

S.W. view. [W. Tower, Nave, S. Porch, S, Chapel ?] 

Buckler. Water col. 1808. v. 40. 

Homington Church. S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, S. Tower, Nave.] 
Buckler. Water col. 1805. ii. 9. 

Horningsham Church. N.E. view. [E. End, Chance], N. Aisle, N. 
Porch, Tower.] S.W. view. [W. Tower and Door, 
Nave, Chancel. The Church rebuilt 1844.] Buckler. 
Water cols. 1804? iii. 7. 

Huish Church. S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, S. Porch ] Buckler. 
Water col. 1806. iv. 8. 

Hullavington Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1809. viii. 25. 

Interior. [N. Nave Arcade, N. Aisle, and Window, 

Chancel, N. Arcade, N. Aisle, and Window.] Buckler. 
Water col. 1809. viii. 62. 

S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, S. Porch, W. Tower.] 

Buckler. Water col. 1809. vi. 29. 

Idmiston Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1805. viii. 4. 

N.W. view. [W. End, wooden Tower, N. Aisle, Nave 

Clerestory, N. Porch, Chancel.] Buckler. Water col. 
1805. i. 11. 

Imber Church. (; Effigies (2). Buckler. Water cols. 1807. viii. 41. 

M>nt. Buckler. Water col. 1807. viii. II. 

I.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, N. Porch, W. Tower.] 

' Buckler. Water col. 1807. v. 3. 

Inglesham Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1810. viii. 31. 

Interior, Norman Arcading N. side of Chancel. Buckler. 

Water col. 1810. viii. 34. 

Sculpture of B.V.M., on "S. side adjoining Porch." 

Buckler. Water col. 1810. viii. 33. 

S. Door [Norman]. Buckler. Water col. 1810. viii. 64. 

■ S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, S. Aisle, S. Porch, W. Bell 

Cot. Cross in Churchyard.] Buckler. Water col. 
1810. vii. 10. 

! Keevil Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1808. viii. 21. 

N.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, N. Transept, Sanctus Cot, 

Nave, N. Porch, VV. Tower.] Buckler. Water col. 
1808. v. 7. 

M 2 



170 The Buckler Collection of Wiltshire Drawings. 

Kelloways Bridge. Sundial on E. side of Bridge. Buckler. Water col. 
1808. viii. 81. 

Kelloways Church. N.W. view. [W. End, N. Side, wooden Bell Cot.] 
Buckler. Water col. 1808. vi. 23. 

Kemble [now in Gloucestershire] Church. Font. Buckler. 
Water col. 1809. viii. 26. 

S. Doorway and Door. Buckler. Water col. 1809. viii. 67. 

S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, S. Aisle, S. Porch, W. Tower 

and Spire.] Buckler. Water col. 1809. vi. 12. 

Kennet, East, Church. S.W. view. [W. End, wooden Turret, Nave, 
S. Porch. House E. of Church.] Buckler. Water col. 
1807. iv. 43. 

Kingston Deverill Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1804. viii. 15. 

N.W. view. [W. End, Nave, N. Door, Central Tower, 

Chancel.] S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Tower, S. 
Aisle, S. Porch.] Buckler. Water cols. 1804. iii. 8. 

Kington Langley [Langley Fitzurse] Church. Font. Buckler. 
Water col. 1808. viii. 19. 

Chancel Arch. [Norman Arch. Church rebuilt 1855.] 

Buckler. Water col. 1808. viii. 75. 

Kington St. Michael Church. S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, S. Aisle. 
S. Porch, W. Tower. Part of House W. of Church.] 
Buckler. Water col. 1808. vi. 7. 

Kington, "West, Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1809. viii. 24. 

N.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, N. Transept, W. Tower.] 

Buckler. Water col. 1809. vi. 13. 

Knook Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1804. viii. 17. 

S.W. view. [W. End, Nave, S. Door, Chancel.] N.E. 

view. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, N. Porch, wooden Bell 
Cot.] Buckler. Water cols. 1804. iii. 38. 

Knoyle, East, Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1804. viii. 14. 

N.W. view. [W. Tower, Nave, N. Porch.] S.E. view. 

[E. End, Chancel, S. Transept, Nave, S. Porch, W. 
Tower.] Buckler. Water cols. 1804. ii. 18. 

Knoyle, West, Church. Flat Gravestone, 1600. Buckler. Water col 
1804. viii. 36. 

— - N.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Nave with two N. Doors, 

W. Tower.] S.W. view. [Tower, Nave, S. Porch, 
Chancel. The Church was rebuilt 1878, except the 
Tower.] Buckler. Water cols. 1804. ii. 19. 

Lacock Abbey. View from the River ; and two Views of Three Sides of 
the Cloisters. Buckler. Three Water cols 1808 
x. 21, 22. 



The BtccJder Collection of Wiltshire Drawings. 171 

Lacock Church. Brass of Robert Baynard. Buckler. Water col. viii, 98. 

N.W. view. [W. Tower and Spire, W. Porch, N. Aisle, 

Nave Clerestory, N. Transept.] Buckler. Water col. 
1808. vi. 30. 

Lacock Cross. Buckler. Water col. 1808. viii. 81. 

Lake House. S. view [Front]. Buckler. Water col. 1805. x. 37. 

Landford Church. N. Door [Norman]. Buckler. Water col. 1806. 
viii. 71. 

N.W. view. [W. End, wooden Turret, N. Porch, N. 

Transept. House E. of Church. Church rebuilt 1858.] 
Buckler. Water col. 1806. i. 12. 

Langford, Little, Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1804. viii. 17. 

N.E. view. [E. End, Chance], Nave, N. Porch.] 8.W. 

view, [W. End, Nave, Norman Door, S. Transept.] 
Buckler. Water cols. 1804? iii. 10. 

* — S. Door [Norman Tympanum]. Buckler. Water col. 

1806. viii. 70. 

Langley Burr ell Church. Sedilia. Sepulchral Slab with two Effigies 
on W. side of Tower. Buckler. Two Water cols. 1808. 
viii. 75. 

S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, S. Aisle, S. Tower.] Buckler. 

Water col. 1808. vi. 14. 

Langley Pitzurse, see Kington Langley. 

Latton Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1810. viii. 29. 

S. Door [Norman]. Buckler. Water col. 1810. viii. 65. 

S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, S. Transept, S. Porch, W. 

Tc met.] Buckler. Water col. 1810. vii. 11. 

Latton, Cross in vj lage. Buckler. Water col. 1810. viii 82. 

Laverstock Church. S. Door and Moulding. Buckler. Water col. 

1806. viii. 70. 

S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, S. Porch, wooden 

Turret. Church rebuilt 1844.] Buckler. Water col. 

ii. 30. 

Lavington, Market (or East), Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 

1807. viii. 11. 

S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, S. Aisle, Nave Clerestory, 

S. Porch, W. Tower.] Buckler, Water col. 1807. v. 9. 

Lavington, West (or Bishop's), Church. Brass Inscriptions of 
John Dawnse [lost], John Auncell, and John Dauntsey. 
Buckler. Three Water cols. viii. 85. 

Capitals (two) of Nave Arcade. Buckler, Water col. 

1807. viii. 72. 

' Font. Buckler. Water col. 1807. viii. 11. 

S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, S. Aisle, Nave S. Chapel, 

Nave S. Aisle, S. Porch, W. Tower.] Buckler. Water 
col. 1807. v. 8. 



172 The Buckle?- Collection of Wiltshire Drawings. 

Lea Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1809. viii. 23. 

S.E. view. [E. End, S. Side, S. Porch, W. Tower.] 

Buckler. Water col. 1 809. vi. 8. 

Leigh, The, Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1810. viii. 29. 

S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, S. Porch, wooden 

Turret. The Nave was removed and re- erected some 
years ago, the Chancel remains,] Buckler. Water col. 
1810. vii. 1. 

Leigh Delamere Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1808. viii. 20. 

S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Central Bell Turret, S. 

Aisle, S. Porch. Church was rebuilt 1 846. Bell Turret 
placed over School House at Sevington.] Buckler. 
Water col. 1808. vi. 15. 

Liddington Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1810. viii. 28. 

Heads of Recessed Arcade on N. Side. Buckler. Water 

col. 1810. viii. 34. 

N.W. view. [W. Tower and Door, N. Aisle and Door.] 

Buckler. Water col. 1810. vii. 14. 

Limpley Stoke Church. " Stoke Church," N.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, 
Central Bell Cot, Nave, N. Porch, W. Tower and Spire.] 
Buckler. Water col. 1808. v. 40. 

Stone Pulpit. Buckler. Water col. 1808. viii. 63. 

Littlecot House. N. and S. views. Buckler. Water cols. 1806. x. 13. 

Littleton Drew Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1809. viii. 24. 

N.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Central Tower, Nave, N. 

Porch. Old House W. of Church.] Buckler. Water 
col. 1809. vi. 29. 

Longbridge Deverill Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1804. 
viii. 15. 

S.W. view. [W. Tower, S. Aisle, Nave Clerestory, S. 

Porch, Chancel.] Buckler. Water col. 1804? iii. 6. 

Longleat House. S.E. view. Buckler. Water col. 1804. x. 48. 

Longford Castle. [Entrance Front.] Buckler. Water col. 1805. x. 29. 

[Garden Front. One of the Round Towers in course of 

erection.] Buckler. Water col, 1805. x. 30. 

N. view. Buckler. Water col. 1811. x. 31. 

Luckington Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1809. viii. 22. 

S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, S. Aisle, Tower, S. Porch. 

House W. of Church.] Buckler. Water col. 1809. 
vi. 16. 

Ludgershall Castle. [Remains of Walls.] E. and N. views. 1805. 
Buckler. Water cols. x. 3, 4. 

Ludgershall Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1805. viii. 5. 

S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, S. Aisle, S. Porch, Tower.] 

Buckler. Water col. 1805. i. 13. 



Tlie Buckler Collection of Wiltshire Drawings. 173 

Ludgershall Cross. Buckler. Water col. 1805. x. 5. 

Lydiard Millicent Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1810. viii. 30. 

■ ■ S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, S. Aisle, S. Porch, W. Tower. 

Cross in Churchyard.] Buckler. Water col. vii. 12. 

Lydiard Tregoze Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1810. viii. 30. 

S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, S. Aisle, S. Porch, W. Tower, 

Sanctus Cot. Manor House adjoining.] Buckler. 
Water col. 1810. vii. 13. 

Lyneham Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1806. viii. 7. 

S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, S. Porch, Tower. 

Chancel rebuilt.] Buckler. Water col. 1806, iv. 48. 

Maddington Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1805. viii. 1. 

N.E. view. [Chancel, Nave, N. Porch, Tower.] Buckler. 

Water col. 1804 (?). iii. 28. 

Maiden Bradley Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1804. viii. 15. 

N.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, N. Aisle, W. /Tower.] 

S.W. view. [W. Tower, S. Aisle, S. Porch. House E. 
of Church.] Buckler. Water cols. 1804. iii. 39. 

Maiden Bradley House. Buckler. Water col. 1806. x. 47. 

Malmesbury Abbey Church. Interior, looking N.E. from S. Aisle. 
Buckle:. Water col. 1809. vi. 40. 

_ S.W. vi w. [W. End, S. Side, Ruins of S. Transept.] 

N.E. View. [N. Arch of Crossing, N. Side. House W. 
of A^bey Church.] Buckler. Water cols. 1809. vi. 
38, 3^. 

Tile, Heraldic. Buckler. Water col. 1809. viii. 79. 

Calmesbury Abbey House. N.W. view. S. view. [Entrance and 
Front, (also as Vignette on title page of Vol. X.)] 
Buckler. Water cols. 1809. vi. 36. 

Calmesbury, Burnivale Chapel, Remains of. N.E. view. Buckler. 
Water col. 1809. vi. 35. 
— Piscina. Buckler. Water col. 1809. viii. 79. 

Malmesbury, Burton Hill Chapel. S.E. view. [E. End, S. Side.] 
Buckler. Water col. 1809. vi. 34. 

Bllalmesbury, Cross "in a Wall near where the Chapel of St. Helena 
stood." Buckler. Water col. 1809. viii. 79. 

VEalmesbury Market Cross. [St. Paul's Church, E. End and Tower 
and Spire. Old Houses in Street.] Buckler. Water 
col. 1809. vi. 37. 

Malmesbury, St. John's Almshouses and Bridge. Buckler. 
Water col. 1809. vi. 34. 

Malmesbury, St. Mary's Church. Font, Buckler. Water col. 
1809. viii. 25. 



174 The Buckler Collection of Wiltshire Drawings, 

Malmesbury, St. Paul's Church. N.E. view. [Tower and Spire 
with Houses.] Buckler. Water col. 1809. vi. 35. 

Malmesbury, Westport Church. S.E. view. [E. End, S. Aisle, two 
Doors, and wooden Hell Cot. Old Houses W. of Church.] 
Buckler. Water col. 1809. vi. 19. 

Manningford Abbots Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1806. 
viii. 7. 

S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, S. Porch, Turret.] 

Buckler. Water col. 1806. iv. 9. 

Manningford Bruce Church. S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, 
S. Porch, wooden Turret.] Buckler. Water col. 1806. 
iv. 9. 

Marden Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1807. viii. 12. 

■ S. Door [Norman], Chancel Arch [Norman], Arch Mould 

of do. Buckler. Water cols. 1807. viii. 72. 

S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, S. Porch, W. Tower.] 

Buckler. Water colour. 1807. v. 23. 

Marlborough Market House. Columns, and Plan. Buckler. Water 

cols. 1803. viii. 53. 
Marlborough St. Mary's Church. Font, Nave Arcade, W. Door 

[Norman]. Buckler. Three Water cols. 1803. viii. 53. 

N.E. view [E. End, N. Side, Tower. House W. of Church.] 

S.W. view. [Tower, W. Door, S. Side, 8. Door. Houses 
N. and E. of Church.] Buckler. Water cols. 1803. 
iv. 18, 19. 

Marlborough St. Peter's Church. N.E. view. [E. End, N. Side, W. 
Tower. Houses N. and S. of Church.] S.W. view. 
[W. End, W. Door, S. Porch, S. Aisle, Chancel. Houses 
N. and E. of Church.] Buckler. Water cols. 1803. 
iv. 20, 21. 

Marston Maisey Church. S.E. view. [E. End, S. Side and Porch. 
Houses W. of Church. Church has been rebuilt.] 
Buckler. Water col. 1810. vii. 21. 

Marston, South, Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1810. viii. 28. 

N. and S. Doors [Norman]. Buckler. Water cols. 1810. 

viii. 65. 

S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, S. Porch, W. Tower.] 

Buckler. Water col. 1810. vii. 22. 

Martin Church. N.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, N. Aisle and Transept, 
W. Tower and Spire. ) S.W. view. [Tower and Spire, 
S. Porch, S. Transept, Chancel.] Buckler. Water cols. 
1805. ii. 10. 

Martin Cross and White Hart Inn. Buckler. Water col. 1805. 
ii. 11. 

Melksham Church. Font. Nave Arcade. Buckler. Water cols. 1803. . 
viii. 52. 



The Buckler Collection of Wiltshire Drawings. 175 

N.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, N. Transept, Central 

Tower, N. Porch.] S.W. view. [W. End, S. Aisle, 
Nave Clerestory, S. Porch, S. Transept, Central Tower, 
S. Chapel of Chancel.] Buckler. Water cols. 1803. 
v. 10, 11. 

Mere Church. Altar tomb. Buckler. Water col. 1804. viii. 36. 

Font. Buckler. Water col. 1804. viii. 15. 

N.E. view. [E. End, N. Aisle, N. Porch, Tower.] S.W. 

view. [W. Tower, S. Aisle, Nave Clerestory, Sanctus 
Cot, S. Porch.] Buckler. Water cols. 1804. iii. 11,12. 

Mere Market House [Now destroyed. Inn and other Houses], ii. 16. 

Mildenhall Church. Arcade. Buckler. Water col. 1806. viii. 48. 

Font. Buckler. Water col. 1806. viii. 6. 

S.E. view. [E. End. Chancel, S. Aisle, Nave, S. Porch, 

Tower.] Buckler. Water col. 1806. iv. 1. 

Milston Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1805. viii. 5. 

S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, S. Door, wooden 

Bell Cot.] Buckler. Water col. 1805(f). i. 14. 

Milston Parsonage House. N.E. Buckler. Water col. 1805 (?). i. 14- 

Milton Lilbourne Churf a.. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1806. viii. 9. 

S.W. view [Tower, W. Door, Nave, S. Porch, Chancel.] 

Buckle. Water col. 1806. iv. 3. 

Minety Church. Brass of Nich. Powlett. Buckler. Water col. viii. 87. 

Font. Buckler. Water col. 1809. viii. 26. 

S.W. view. [W. End, Tower, Nave, S. Porch, Chancel.] 

Buckler. Water col. 1809. vi. 12. 

Monkton (nr. Holt) House. S.W. Buckler. Water col. 1808. x. 6. 

Monkton Deverill Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1804. viii. 15. 

S.W. view. [W. Tower, S. Porch, Nave.] Buckler. Water 

col. 1804. iii. 3. 

Monkton Farleigh Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1808. viii. 18. 

N. Door [Norman]. Buckler. Water col. 1808. viii. 69. 

N.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, N. Porch, W. Tower.] 

Buckler. Water col. 1808. v. 26. 

Netheravon Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1805. viii. 5. 

N.W. view. [VV. Tower, N. Aisle, N. Porch, Nave 

Clerestory, Chancel.] Buckler. Water col. 1803. v. 6. 

Netherhampton Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1804. viii. 16. 

N.E. view. [1£. End, Chancel, Nave, N. Porch, Tower.] 

Buckler. Water col. i. 29. 

Nettleton Church. Columns and Shafts. Buckler. Water col. 1809. 
viii. 59. 

Font. Buckler. Water col. 1809. viii. 24. 

S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, S. Transept, Nave ? S. Porch, 

W. Tower.] Buckler. Water col. 1809. vi. 13. 

I VOL. XL. — NO. CXVIII. N 



176 The Buckler Collection of Wiltshire Drawings. 

Newnton, Long [" Newton "], Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 
i807. viii. 22. 

— S.E. view. [E. End, S. Side, S. Porch, W. Tower.] Buckler. 

Water col. 1809. vi. 6. 

Newnton, North [" Newenton "], Church. Font. Buckler. Water 
col. 1807. viii. 12. 

S.W. view. [W. End, Tower, Nave, S. Porch, Chancel.] 

Buckler. Water col. 1807. iv. 42. 

Newton, South, Church. S.W. view. [W. Tower, Nave, S. Porch, 
Chancel.] N.E. view, [E. End, Chancel, Nave, Tower.] 
Buckler. Water cols. 1804. i. 28. 

Newton Toney Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1805. viii. 4. 

S.W. view. [W. End, wooden Turret, Nave, S. Porch, 

Chancel. Church rebuilt 1844.] Buckler. Water col. 
1805. i. 5. 

Norton Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1809. viii. 25. 

N.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, N. Porch, small 

Turret.] Buckler. Water col. 1809. vi. 28. 

Norton Bavant Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1804. viii. 15. 

. N.W. view. . [W. Tower, Nave, N. Porch, Chancel. S.E. 

view. [E. End, Chancel, S. Transept.] Buckler. 
Water cols. 1804. iii. 30. 

Nunton Church. S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, S. Aisle, S. Porch, 
wooden Turret. Church much rebuilt 1855.] Buckler. 
Water col. 1801. i. 22. 

Oaksey Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1 809. viii. 26. 

N.E. view. [E.End, Chancel, Nave, N. Porch, VV. Tower.] 

Buckler. Water col. 1809. vi. 17. 

Odstock Church. N.W. view. [W. Tower, Nave, N. Door, Chancel.] 
S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, S. Porch, Tower. | 
Buckler. Water cols. 1805. ii. 20. 

Ogbourne St. Andrew Church. Arcade, Font, S. Door [Norman]. 
Buckler. Water cols. 1803. viii. 51. 

7 S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, S. Aisle, Nave, S. Porch, 

W. Tower] N.W. view. [Tower, N. Aisle, Chancel.] 
Buckler. Water cols. 1803. iv. 10. 

Ogbourne St. George Church. Brass of Thomas Goddard. Buckler. 
Water col. viii. 93. 

Capitals (3). Buckler. Water cols. 1806. viii. 10. 

Font. Buckler. Water col. 1 806. viii. 7. 

S.E. view. TE. End, Chancel. S. Aisle, Nave, S. Porch, 

Tower.] Buckler. Water col. 1806. iv. 11. 

Orcheston St. George Church. S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, 
W. Tower.] Buckler. Water col. 1805. iii. 13. 

Orcheston St. Mary Church. S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, 
S. (-Porch, Tower. House W. of Church. Buckler. 
Water col. 1805. iii. 13. 






The Buckler Collection of Wiltshire Drawings. 177 

Overton, West, Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1807. viii. 13. 

S E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, S. Porch, W. Tower. 

Church rebuilt 1878.] Buckler. Water col. 1807. iv. 43. 

Patney Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1807. viii. 12. 

Piscina. Buckler. Water col. 1807. viii. 46. 

S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, S. Porch, wooden 

Turret.] Buckler. Water col. 1807. x. 12. 

Pertwood Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1804. viii. 14. 

S.W. view. [W. End, S. Side.] Buckler. Water cok 

iii. 31. 

Pewsey Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1806. viii. 7. 

N.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, N. Aisle, Nave, N. Porch, 

Tower.] Buckler. Water col. 1806. iv. 12. 

Pitton Church. Brass inscription of Ed. Zouch. Buckler. Water col. 
viii. 89. 

— — S. W. view. [W. End, Nave, S. Porch and Tower, Chancel. 

Old Cottage N. of Church.] Buckler. Water col. 
1805. i. 9. 

Plaitford Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1805. viii. 3. 

S.W. view. [E. End, wooden Turret, S. Side Nave.] 

Buckler. Water col. 1805. i. 18. 

Tiles (4). Buckler. Water cols. 18Q5, 6. i. 12; viii. 3. 

Pool Keynes Church (now in Gloucestershire). S.E. view. [E. End, 
Chancel, Nave, W. Tower. House with Mediaeval 
Chimney W. of Church.] Buckler. Water col. 1809. 
vi. 17. 

Porton Chapel. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1805. viii. 4. 

S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, S. Porch, wooden 

Turret.] Buckler. Water col. 1805. i. 11. 

Potterne Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1806, viii. 10. 

S. W. view. [W. End, Nave, S. Porch, S. Transept, 

Central Tower, Chancel.] N.E. view. [Chancel, N. 
Transept, Tower, N. Porch, Nave.] Buckler. Water 
cols. 1806. v. 14. 

Potterne Porch House. Buckler. Water col. 1806. v. 25. 

Poulshot Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1808. viii. 21. 

•. S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, S. Porch, wood 

Turret. Church burnt down.] Buckler. Water col. 
1808. v. 13. 

Poulton Church, (now in Gloucestershire). N.W. view. [W. End, 
Nave, N. Porch, Chancel, Central wooden Turret. 
Buckler. Water col. 1810. vii. 4. 

Preshute Church. Font, Nave Arcade, S. Door [Norman]. Buckler. 
Three Water cols. 1803. viii. 54. 

S. E. view. [E. End, Chancel, S. Aisle, S. Porch, Tower.] 

N.W. view. [Tower, W. Door, Nave, Chancel.] 
Buckler. Water cols. 1803. iv. 13. 

N 2 



178 The Buckler Collection of Wiltshire Drawings. 

Furton Church. Font, Piscina, Canopied Recesses on N. and S. of 
Chancel. Buckler. Three Water cols. 1810. viii. 30,34. 

S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, S. Aisle, S. Transept, S. 

Porch, Central Spire, W. Tower. Old Yew Tree and 
Cross in Churchyard. Manor House N.W. of Church.] 
Buckler. Water col. 1810. vii. 15. 

Ramsbury Church. Canopied Altar Tomb. Buckler. Water col. 1806. 
viii. 42. 

S.E. view. [E.End, Chancel, S. Aisle, Nave Clerestory, 

S. Porch, Tower.] Buckler. Water col. 1806. iv. 14. 

Rodborne Cheney Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1810. viii. 28. 

S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, S. Aisle, Nave, S. Porch, 

Central Tower.] Buckler. Water col. 1810. vii. 14. 

Rodbourne Church (nr. Malmesbury). N. and S. Doors [Norman Tym- 
panum]. Buckler. Water cols. 1809. viii. 66. 

S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, wooden Bell Cot, Nave, S. 

Porch.] Buckler. Water col. 1809. vi. 33. 

Rodbourne Cross [Church in distance]. Buckler. Water col. 1809. 
vi. 33. 

Rollestone Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1805. viii. 1. 

S.W. view. [W End, Nave, S. Door, Chancel.] Buckler. 

- Water col. 1805. iii. 32. 

Rowde Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1806. viii. 8. 

N.E. View. [E. End, Chancel, N. Aisle, N. Porch, Nave 

Clerestory, Tower.] Buckler. Water col. 1806. iv. 40. 

Rushall Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1807. viii. 12. 

S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, S. Porch, W. Tower. 

Building N. of Church.] Buckler. Water col. 1807, 
v. 15. 

Salisbury. Belfry in Close [pulled down]. Buckler. Water col. ix. 14. 

Salisbury. Antelope Inn. Three Reliefs over Chimnies. Buckler 
Water cols. 1805. ix. 15. 

Salisbury Cathedral and Chapter House from Bishop's Garden. Buck- 
ler. Three Water cols. 1809,1812. ix. 28, 29,31. 

Beauchamp Chapel " After Schnebele " [Interior, showing 

Roof and Tombs. Plan of do.] Buckler. Water cols. 
ix. 43. 

Chapter House, Entrance to [looking into Chapter Ho.]. 

Interior [looking W., showing ancient Table]. Buckler. 
Water cols. 1808,1810. ix. 38, 39. 

Cloisters [looking N.W. and S.W.] Buckler. TvtoWater 

cols. 1803. ix. 40, 41. 

Hungerford Chapel [Interior, Windows, Heraldry, Mural 

Painting]. Buckler. Water col. ix. 42. 

Lavatory [" Piscina "]. Buckler. Water col. 1809. ix. 44. 

Monument of Boy Bishop. Buckler. Water col. 1803. 

ix. 26. 

Nave [Interior looking E. Organ on Wyatt's stone Screen.] 

Buckler. Water col. 1808. ix. 34. 



The Buckler Collection of Wiltshire Drawings. 179 

Salisbury Cathedral. N. Porch. [Exterior and Interior]. Buckler. 
Two Water cols. 1811. ix. 37. 

N.E. view [from Close]. Buckler. Water col. 1810. ix. 33. 

■ N.VV. view [from Close]. Buckler. Water col. 1809. ix. 30. 

Porch removed from [view and plan]. Exterior and In- 

terior [standing in garden. House seen through arches.] 
Buckler. Four Water cols. 1803,1811. ix. 26, 27. 

S.W. view [W. End, Cloister Wall, &c] Buckler. Water 

col. 1810. ix. 32. 

W.Door. Buckler. Water col. 1811. ix. 36. 

W. Front. Buckler. Water col 1811. ix. 35. 

Salisbury Church House ["Workhouse" Street Front with Crane Bridge. 
Courtyard]. Buckler. Two Water cols. 1805. ix. 8, 9. 

Salisbury Close. E. Entrance to Palace [Stables, &c.J Buckler. Water 
col. ix. 4. 

Harnham Gate [Inside with houses at side. Outside]. 

Buckler. Two Water cols. 1803,1804. ix. 2,3. 

N. Gate [N. side looking into Close. S. side looking up 

the street]. Buckler. Water cols. 1804. ix. 1. 

St. Ann's Gate [Inside. Outside]. Buckler. Water cols. 

1803, 1804. ix. 2, 3. 

Salisbury. College House. S.E. Buckler. Water col. ' 1811. x.32. 

Salisbury. College de Vaux. Arcade of Church [Elevation]. Buckler. 
Water col. 1805 (?). ii. 36. 

Salisbury. Council House. N.W T . [Old wooden House next to it.] 
Buckler. Water col. 1805. ix. 13. 

Salisbury. Deanery. W. side [Garden Front]. N.E. [Front]. Buckler. 
Water col. 1805. ix. 23. 

Salisbury. Pisherton Church. S.E. [E. End, S. Transept, Nave, 
S. Porch, W. Tower]. N.VV. [W. End, Tower, N. Aisle, 
N. Transept. Church rebuilt.]. Buckler. Water cols. 
1803. i. 27. 

Salisbury. George Inn. [Houses beside it.] Buckler. Water col. 
1805. ix. 7. 

Salisbury. Guild Hall, the old. View and Plan. [Taken down before 
1810. Old House near it.] Buckler. Water cols, ix 11, 12. 

Salisbury. Harnham Bridge, Chapel of St, John. N.E. [E. end 

and N. side complete]. Buckler. Water col. 1803. 
i. 26. 

Salisbury. Joiners' Hall, St. Ann's Street. Buckler. Water col. 
1805. ix. 4. 

Salisbury. King's House. Front, W. Side, Porch. Buckler. Three 
Water cols. 1804, 1805. ix. 5, 6. 

Salisbury. Market House, or Town Hall " now taken down." [Old 
Houses near it.] Buckler. Water col. ix. 14. 



180 The Buckler Collection of Wiltshire Drawings. 

Salisbury, New Street. Old House on N. side. Porch on S. side. 
Buckler. Two Water cols. 1808. ix. 10. 

Salisbury. Palace. Entrance Front, Interior of Chapel, Plan of Chapel. 
Buckler. Three Water cols. 1805 (?). ix. 24, 25. 

Sculptured Ornaments [Norman] from Old Sarum built 

into the wall of Palace Garden. Buckler. Water col. 

1810. ix. 16. 

Salisbury. Poultry Cross. [With Sundial instead of present roof 
and nnial. Old Houses near it.] Buckler. Water col. 
. 1810. ix. 16. 

Salisbury. St. Edmund's Church. S.W. view. [W. Tower and Door, 

S. Aisle with W. Door.] N.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, 
N. Aisle, W. Tower.] Buckler. Water cols. 1803. ix.17. 

Salisbury. St. Martin's Church. N.W. view. [S.W. Tower and 

Spire, W. End and Door, Nave, Chancel.] S.E. view. 
[E. End, Chancel, S. Aisle, Tower.] Buckler. Water 
cols. 1805. ix. 19. 

Font. Becessed Tomb on N. side. Buckler. Water cols. 

1811. ix. 20. 

Salisbury. St. Nicholas's Hospital, Harnham. S.E. view. [Showing 
Early English work.] W. view. [Porch, Early English 
Gable, <fcc] Buckler. Two Water cols. 1805 (?) ii. 36. 

Salisbury. St. Thomas's Church. Beckham Monument on W. Front. 
Buckler. Water col. 1805. ix. 22. 

S.E. view. [E. End, Vestry, S. Aisle, Clerestory of Nave 

and Chancel, S. Tower.] N.W. view. [W. End, N. 
Aisle, Clerestory, N. Porch, Vestry, Tower.] S.W. 
view. [W. End, S. Tower. House built against S. Aisle]. 
Buckler. Three Water cols. 1803, 1805. ix. 18, 21. 

Salisbury. Trinity Street. "Ancient Building." Buckler. Water 

col. 1805. ix. 7. 

Savernake Lodge. [Burnt down.] Buckler. Water col. 1806. x. 16. 

Seagry Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1804. viii. 20 

— — S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, S. Transept, S. Porch, 

W.Bell Cot.] Buckler. Water col. 1808. vi. 31. 

Sedgehill Church. N.W. view. [W. Tower, Nave. Cross in Church- 
yard.] S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, S. Porch, 
Tower.] Buckler. Water cols. 1804. ii. 33. 

Seend Church. N.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, N. Aisle, Nave Clerestory, 
N. Porch, W. Tower.] Buckler. Water col. 1808. v. 37. 

Semington Chapel. "Sevington" in error. N.W. view. [W. End, 
Nave, N. Porch, Chancel, Central wooden Turret.J 
Buckler. Water col. 1808. v. 13. 

Semley Church. S.W. view. [W. Tower, S. Aisle.] N.E. view. [E. 
End of Chancel and S. Aisle, Chancel, Nave, N. Porch, 
W. Tower. Church rebuilt 1875.] Buckler. Water 
cols. 1804. ii. 21. 



The Buckler Collection of Wiltshire Drawings. 181 

Sevenhampton Chapel. S.E. view. [E. End, S. Side, W. Tower and 
Spire.] Buckler. Water col. 1810. vii. 21. 

Sherrington Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1804. viii. 17. 

N.VV. view. [W. End, Nave, Chancel.] S.E. view. [E. 

End, Chancel, Nave, S. Porch.] Buckler. Water cols. 
1804 (?). iii. 14. 

Sherston Church. Effigy in Recess on N. side. Buckler. Water col. 
1809. viii. 44. 

Font. Buckler. Water col. 1809. viii. 22. 

■ Figure of " Rattlebone," E. side of Porch, N. Nave Arcade 

and detail. Buckler. Water cols. 1809. viii. 60. 

S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, S. Aisle, S. Porch, Central 

Tower.] Buckler. Water col. 1809. vi. 27. 

Cross near Church. [Sculptured Base, now in Vicarage 

Garden, on five flights of steps.] Cross in Street. 
Buckler. Two Water cols. 1809. viii. 80. 

Sherston, Little [Pinkney], Cross. Buckler. Water col. 1809. 
viii. 80. 

Shorncote Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1810. viii. 29. 

S.W. view. [W. End, S. Porch, Nave, Chancel, Bell Cot.] 

Buckler. Water col. vii. 12. 

Shrewton Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1805. viii. 1. 

N.W. view. [W. Tower and Door, N. Aisle, Chancel.] 

Buckler. Water col. 1805. iii. 32. 

Slaughterford Church. S.W. view. [W. Tower, fragment of Nave 
Arcade in ruins. Church rebuilt 1823.] Buckler. 
Water col. 1807(?). vi. 21. 

Somerford, Great, Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1809. viii. 23. 

S.E. view. [K. End, Chancel, Nave, S Porch, W. Tower.] 

Buckler. Water col. 1809. vi. 18. 

Somerford, Little, Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1809. viii. 23. 

S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, S. Porch, W. Tower.] 

Buckler. Water col. 1809. vi. 18. 

Somerford Keynes Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1810. viii.30. 

Saxon Doorhead N. side. Buckler. Water col. 1810. 

viii. 34. 

S.E. view. [E.End, Chancel, Nave, S. Porch, W. Tower. 

Old House VV. of Church.] Buckler. Water col. 1810. 
vii. 11. 

lopworth Church (now Gloucestershire). S.E. view. [E.End, Chancel, 
Nave, S. Porch, W. Tower. House W. of Church.] 
Buckler. Water col. 1809. vi. 16. 

pye Park Gateway. [And Gateway to Bowden House.] Buckler. 

Water col. 1806. x. 14. 
House. [Square Classical House, with large Portico. 

Present House built 1870.] Buckler. Water col. 

1806. x. 15. 



182 The Buckler Collection of Wiltshire Drawings, 

Standlinch Chapel. S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Nave.] Buckler. 
Water col. 1 805. ii. 34. 

Standlinch House, see Trafalgar. 

Stanton Pitzwarren Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1810. 
viii. 31. 

N.W. view. [W. End, Nave, N. Door, N. Tower.] S.E. 

view. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, S. Porch, Tower. 
Buckler. Water cols. 1810. vii. 16. 

S. Door and Chancel Arch [Norman]. Buckler. Water 

col. 1810. viii. 64. 

Stanton St. Bernard Church. N.W. view. [Tower, W. Door, Nave, 
N. Porch, Chancel.] Buckler. Water col. 1807. iv. 46. 

Stanton St. Quintin Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1808. 
viii. 20. 

Interior, Nave Arcade. Chancel Arch. S.Door [Norman.] 

Buckler. Three Water cols. 1808. viii. 61. 

S.W. view. [E. End, Nave, S. Porch, Central Tower, 

Chancel.] Buckler. Water col. 1808. vi. 15. 

Stanton St. Quintin. Old Manor House and square Tower. 

[ Destroy edaV 1810?]. Buckler. Water col. 1808. x. 12. 

Stapleford Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1804. viii. 17. 

Nave Arcade. Sedilia and Piscina. S. Door [Norman.] 

Buckler. Three Water cols. 1804. viii. 57. 

N.W. view. [W. End, Nave Clerestory, N. Tower, Chancel.] 

S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, S. Transept, Nave, S. 
Porch.] Buckler. Water cols. 1804?. iii. 33. 

Staverton Chapel. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1808. viii. 21. 

S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, S. Porch, Bell Cot.] 

Buckler. Water col. 1808. v. 39. 

Steeple Ashton Church. S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, S. Aisle, Nave 
Clerestory, S. Porch, W. Tower.] N.W. view. [Tower, 
N. Aisle, N. Door, Clerestory.] Buckler. Water cols. 
1807. v. 16, 17. 

Steeple Ashton Market Cross. Buckler. Water col. 1807. viii. 41. 

Steeple Langford Church. Chancel Arch. Buckler. Water col. 
1804. viii. 57. 

Font. Buckler. Water col. 1804. viii. 17. 

N.W. view. [W. Tower and Spire, N. Aisle, N. Door.] 

S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, S. Porch, Tower.] 
Buckler. Water cols. 1804. iii. 9. 
Stert Church. N.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, wooden Turret. 
House N. of Church.] Buckler. Water col. v. 25. 

Stockton Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1804. viii. 17. 

Monument and Effigies in N. Aisle. Buckler. Water col. 

1804. viii. 38. 

N.W. view. [W. Tower, N. Aisle, Nave Clerestory, N. 

Porch. House S. of Church.] S.E. view. [E. End, 
Chancel, S. Aisle, Nave Clerestory, Tower.] Buckler. 
Water cols. 1804. iii. 15. 






The Buckler Collection of Wiltshire Drawings. 183 

Stockton House. S.VV. view. Panelled Drawing Room [Porch, Ceiling, 
Chimneypiece.] Buckler. Two Water cols. 1811. x. 
45, 46. 

Stonehenge. S.E. and N.E. view. Buckler. Water cols. 1810. x. 1. 

£Stourhead] "Bristol High Cross, with the Cathedral and Parish 
Church of iSt. Augustine." N.W. Buckler. Water col. 
1809. x. 50. 

Stourhead House. [Front.] Buckler. Water col. 1806. x. 49. 
[Vignette Title.] Buckler. Water col. i. 2. 

Stourton Church. S.E. view. [E. End. Chancel, S. Porch, Nave Cler- 
estory.] N.W. view. [VV. Tower, N. Aisle, N. Porch, 
Clerestory.] Buckler. Water cols. 1804. iii. 16. 

Stratford sub Castle Church. N.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, 
Tower.] S.VV. view. [W. Tower, Nave, S. Porch, 
Chancel.] Buckler. Water cols. 1804. i. 30. 

Stratford sub Castle House. S.E. Buckler. Water col. 1805. x. 36. 

Stratford Toney Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1 805. viii. 4, 

- — S.VV. view. [W. Tower, Nave, Chancel.] Buckler. Water 

col. 1805, ii. 22. 

Stratton St. Margaret's Church. Font. Recessed Canopied Tomb. 
Buckler. Two Water cols. 1810. viii. 31, 34. 

S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, S. Aisle, S. Porch, W. 

Tower.] Buckler. Water col. 1810. vii. 22. 

Sutton Benger Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1808. viii. 20. 

S.W. view. [W. End, W. Tower, S. Aisle. S. Porch.] 

Buckler. Water col. 1808. vi. 31. 

Window, E. End of S. Aisle. Buckler. Water col. 1808. 

viii. 75. 

Sutton Mandeville Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1804. viii. 15. 

S.E. view. [15. End, Chancel, Nave, S. Porch.] Buckler. 

Water col. 1804. ii. 23. 

Sutton Veny [" Great Sutton "] Church. Font. Buckler. Water 
col. 1804. viii. 15. 

S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, S. Transept, Central Tower.] 

N.W. view. [W. End, Nave, N. Door, N. Transept, 
Tower. Only the Chancel now remains, with the ruins 
of the rest.] Buckler. Water cols. 1804. ii. 20. 

Swallowcliffe Church. N. W. view. [W. End, Nave, N. Tower, N. 
Transept. Church has been rebuilt.] Buckler. Water 
col. 1804. ii. 23. 

Swindon Church. Corbel Heads supporting Chancel Arch. Buckler. 
W.iter col. 1810. viii. 33. 

N.W. view. [W. End, Tower, N. Aisle, Nave Clerestory, 

N. Porch, Entrance to Churchyard. Only Chancel 

remains.] Buckler. Water col. 1810. viii. 2. 

JVOL. XL.— NO. CXVIII. O 



184 The Buckler Collection of Wiltshire Drawings. 

Teffont Evias Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1804. viii. 14. 

NE. view. [E. End of Chancel and N. Chapel. Nave.] 

S.W. view. [W. End, Bell Turret, Nave, S. Porch, 
Chancel. Old House E. of Church.] Buckler. Water 
cols. 1804. ii. 24. 

Teffont Magna ["Upper"] Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 

1804. viii. 14. 

S.E view, [E. End, S. Side, S. Porch. House W. of 

Church.] Buckler. Water col. 1804. ii. 15. 

Tidcombe Church. S.E. view. [E. End. Chancel, S. Aisle, Nave, 
Tower.] Buckler. Water col. 1806. iv. 5. 

Tidworth North ["Upper"] Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 

1805. viii. 4. 

S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, S. Porch, Tower.] 

Buckler. Water col. 1805. i. 13. 

Tilshead Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1805. viii. 1. 

S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Central Tower, S. Aisle, 

Nave, S. Porch.] Buckler. Water col. 1805. iii. 34. 

Tisbury Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1804. viii. 14. 

S.W. view. [\V. End, W. Porch, S. Aisle, Nave Clerestory, 

S. Transept, Central Tower, Chancel.] N.E. view. 
[E. End, Chancel, N. Transept, N. Aisle, Clerestory, 
N. Porch.] Buckler. Water cols. 1804. ii. 25, 26. 

Tockenham Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1806. viii. 7. 

N.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, wooden Turret] 

Buckler. Water col. 1806. iv. 44. 

Tollard Royal Church. Effigy. Buckler. Water col. 1804. viii. 36. 

Font. Buckler. Water col. 1804. viii. 1 6. 

N.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, N. Aisle, W. Tower.] S.W. 

view. [W. Tower, Nave, S. Porch, Chancel.] Buckler. 
Water cols. 1804. ii. 27. 

Tottenham Park House. [Front.] Buckler. Water col. 1806. x. 17. 

Trafalgar House. "Standlinch House." S.E. [Front. Eng. in 
Modem Wilts.] Buckler. Water col. 1805. x. 33. 

Trowbridge Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1808. viii. 21. 

N.E. view) [E. end, Chancel, Vestry, N. Aisle, N. Porch, 

Nave Clerestory, W. Tower and Spire, Small House W. 
of Church.] Buckler. Water col. 1808. v. 18. 
f 
Tytherington Chapel. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1804. viii. 15. 

N.W. view. [W. End, N. Door, N. Side.] Buckler. 

Water col. 1804. iii. 17- 

Tytherton Lucas Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1808. viii. 19. 

Nave Arcade [Norman] Buckler. Water col. 1808. 

viii. 61. 

N.W. view. [W. End, 2 Bellcots, Nave, N. Door, Chan- 

cel.] Buckler. Water col. 1808. vi. 14. 



The Buckler Collection of Wiltshire Drawings. 185 

Upavon Church. Chancel Arch and Squint. Column. Buckler. Water 
cols. 1807. viii. 46. 

Font. Buckler. Water col. 1807. viii. 12. 

N.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, N. Door, N. Aisle, N. 

Porch, W. Tower.] Buckler. Water col. 1807. v. 15. 

Upton Lovel Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1804. viii. 17. 

N.VV. view. [W. Tower, Nave, N. Porch, Chancel.] S.E. 

view [E. End, Chancel, Nave, S. Porch, Tower.] Buck- 
ler. Water col. 1804 (?). iii. 18. 

Upton Scudamore Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1806. viii. 9. 

N.Door. Buckler. Water col. 1806. viii. 71. 

N.E. view. [E. End. Chancel, N. Aisle, W. Tower.] 

Buckler. Water col. 1806. iii. 19. 

Urchfont Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1806. viii. 10. 

S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, S. Transept, Nave Cleres- 

tory, S. Porch, W. Tower.] Buckler. Water col. 1806. 
v. 24. 

Wanborough Church. Brass of Thomas Pol ton. Buckler. Two Water 
cols. viii. 95. 

Font. Buckler Water col. 1810. viii. 28. 

N.E. view. [E. End, Vestry, Chancel, Central Spire, N. 

Aisle, Nave Clerestory, N. Porch, W. Tower.] Buckler. 
Water col. 1810. vi'i. 17. 

Wardour Castle. ["House.] S.E. Buckler. Water col. 1805. x. 41. 

[Old.] S. and S.E. views. Buckler. Water cols. 1804. 

x. 42, 43. 

Warminster Chapel (St. Lawrence). [W. Tower, small Church ad- 
joining.] Buckler. Water col. 1804. iii. 1. 

Warminster Church. N.W. view. [W. End, N. Aisle, Classical Nave 
Clerestory, Central Tower] S.E. view. [E. End, 
Chancel, S. Transept, Tower, S. Aisle, Clerestory, S. 
Porch. Nave, &c, rebuilt 1887—89.] Buckler. Water 
col. 1804. iii. 21. 

Westbury Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1 806. viii. 9. 

N.W. view. [W. End, N. Aisle, N: Chapel, Nave Cleres- 

tory, Central Tower.] S.E. view. [F. End, Chancel, 
S. Chapel, S. Transept, Tower, S. Porch, S. Aisle]. 
Buckler. Water cols. 1806. iii. 35, 36. 

Westwood Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1808. viii. 18. 

S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, W. Tower, Manor 

House N. of Church.] Buckler. Water col. 1808. v. 38. 

Whaddon Church. S. Door. [Norman Tympanum.] Buckler. Water 
col. 1808. viii. 69. 

S.W. view. [W. End, Turret, S. Porch, Nave, Chancel.] 

Buckler. Water col. 1 808. v. 26. 

Whaddon House. S.W. [Large Elizabethan House now destroyed.] 
Buckler. Water col. 1808. x. 7. 

O 2 



186 



The Buckler Collection of Wiltshire Drawings. 



Whichbury Church.. [Now in Hants.] N.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, 
Nave, VY\ Tower.] Buckler. Water col. 1805. ii. 33. 

Whiteparish. Ancient Mansion. N.W/ [Of the St. Barbes. Eng.in 
Modern Wills.] Buckler. Water col. 1805. i, 19. 

Whiteparish Church. S.W. view. [W. End, Wooden Turret, Nave. 
Houses N. of Church.] Buckler. Water col. 1805. 
i. 19. 

Wick House. S.E. [Jacobean House.] Buckler. Water col. 1808. x. 6. 

Wilcot Church. Monument to John Berwick. Buckler. Water col. 
1806. viii. 42. 

N.W. view. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, Tower, House W, 

of Church ] Buckler. Water col. 1806. iv. 8. 

Willesford (Wilsford, Pewsey Vale) Church. Font. Buckler. 
Water col. 1807. viii. 12. 

S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, S. Porch. W. Tower.] 

Buckler. Water col. 1807. v. 19. 

Wilsford (nr. Amesbury) Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1805. 
viii. 5. 

S.W. view. [W. End, Tower, Nave, S. Porch, Chancel. 

Rebuilt 1858, except the Tower.] Buckler. Water 
col. i. 17. 

Wilton Abbey " Ancient Building." Buckler. Water col. 1803(?). 
ii. 36. 

Wilton Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1803. viii. 32. 

S.W. view. [W. Tower, S. Aisle, S. Porch.] N.E view. 

[E. End, Chancel, N. Aisle, N. Porch. Only ruins of 
this Church remain.] Buckler. Water cols. 1803. i. 25. 

Wilton House. S.E. view [Two Fronts]. Buckler. Water col. x. 34. 

Holbein Porch [in situ with Plan]. Buckler. Water cols. 

x. 35. 

Wilton Priory [of St. John, Ditchampton]. N.E. and S.E. Buckler. 
Water cols. 1 803. i. 26. 

Winkfield Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1808. viii. 18. 

S.W. view [W. Tower, Nave, S. Porch. Old House N. of 

Church]. Buckler. Water col. 1808. v. 20. 

Winsley Church. S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, S. Porch, W. 
Tower. Church rebuilt 1840 except the Tower]. 
Buckler. Water col. 1808. v. 39. 

Winterbourne Basset Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1807. 
viii. 11. 

N.W. view. [W. Tower, Nave, N. Door, N. Transept, 

Chancel.] Buckler. Water col. 1807. iv. 26. 

Winterbourne Dauntsey Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1805. 
viii. 4. 



The Buckler Collection of Wiltshire Drawings. 187 

Winterbourne Dauntsey Church. S.W. view. [W. End, Nave, Tower, 
and S. Door, Chancel. Church pulled down 1867.] 
Buckler. Water col. 1805. i. 15. 

Winterbourne Earls Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1805. 
viii. 4. 

• S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, S. Tower and Door. 

Church pulled down, new Church built 1868.] Buckler. 
Water col. 1805. i. 16. 

Winterbourne Gunner Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1805. 
viii. 4. 

■ S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, S. Porch, Tower.] 

Buckler. Water col. 1805. i. 15. 

Winterbourne Monk ton Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1807. 
viii. 13. 

S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, S. Porch, Wooden 

Turret.] Buckler. Water col. 1807. iv. 46. 

Winterbourne Stoke Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1805. 
viii. I. 

N. and S. Doors. [Norman.] Buckler. Water cols. 1805. 

viii. 73. 

N.W. view. [W. End, Nave, N. Door, Central Tower, 

Chancel]. Buckler. Water col. 1805. iii. 26. 

Winterslow Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1805. viii. 3. 

S.W. view. [VV. End, S. Porch and Wooden Turret. 

Chancel.] Buckler. Water col. 1805. i. 16. 

Wishford Church. Effigy under Canopy. Buckler. Water col. 1804. 
viii. 37. 

S.W. view. [W. Tower, Nave Clerestory, S. Porch]. 

N.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, Tower. Cottages 
S. and W. of Church.] Buckler. Water cols. 1804. 
iii. 23. 

Woodborough Church. S.W. view. [W. End, Wooden Turret, S. 
Porch, Nave, Chancel. Church rebuilt.] Buckler. 
Water col. 1807. iv. 42. 

Woodford Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1805. viii. 5. _ 

■ S. Door. [Norman] Buckler. Water col. 1805. viii. 73. 

S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, S. Aisle, S. Porch, 

Tower. Church rebuilt 1845 except Tower.] Buckler. 
Water col. 1805. i. 6. 

Wootton Basset fChurch. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1806. viii. 8. 

■ S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, S. Porch, >W. Tower. 

Church much altered and enlarged 1870.] Buckler. 
Water col. 1806. iv. 44. 

Wootton Rivers Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1806. viii. 7. 

S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, S. Porch, Wooden 

Turret.] Buckler. Water col. 1806. iv. 12. 

Wraxall, North, Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1809. viii. 27. 
S.Door. [Norman]. Buckler. Water col. 1809. viii. 68. 



188 The Buckler Collection of Wiltshire Drawings. 

Wraxall, Worth, Church. S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, S. 
Porch, W. Tower.] Buckler. Water col. 1809. vi. 5. 

Wraxall, South ("Upper") Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 
1808. viii. 19. 

S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, S. Aisle, W. Tower. House 

N. of Church.] Buckler. Water col. 1808. v. 20. 

Wraxall, South, House. Entrance Gatehouse, Courtyard. Buckler- 
Water cols. 1808. x. 9,10. 

[Vignette.] Buckler. Water col. Title Page vol. x. 

Wraxall, South. Wall Arcade in old house near Wraxall House. 
Buckler. Water col. 1808. viii. 75. 

Wroughton Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1810. viii. 28. 

Sedilia and Piscina. Buckler. Water col. 1810. viii. 33. 

Nave Arcade. [N. Side, Norman, N. Aisle Door and 

Windows, marks of five circular blocked windows in 
Clerestory.] Buckler. Water col. 1810. viii. 58. 

S.Door. Buckler. Water col. 1810. viii. 65. 

S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, S. Aisle, Nave Clerestory, 

Sanctus Cot, S. Porch, W. Tower.] Buckler. Water 
col. vii. 8. 

Wylye Church. S.W. view. [W. Tower, Nave, S. Porch, Chancel.] 
N.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, Tower.] Buckler. 
Water cols. 1804. rii. 22. 

Yatesbury Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1806. viii. 8. 

- — S.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, S. Porch, Tower. 

Chancel rebuilt 1854] Buckler. Water col. 1806. 
iv. 45. 

Tatton Keynell Church. Font. Buckler. Water col. 1809. viii. 24. 

N.E. view. [E. End, Chancel, Nave, N. Porch, W. Tower, 

House S. of Church.] Buckler. Water col. 1809. vi. 9. 

Stone Screen. Buckler. Water col. 1809. viii. 77. 



Buckler Drawings Engraved in " Modern Wilts." 

The following illustrations in Hoare's Modem Wilts are engraved from 
drawings by Buckler, some twelve or fourteen of them duplicates apparently 
of drawings in this series. Mere Church N.E. ; Longleat Front, and Hall 5 
Boyton Church, Effigy of Elias Giffard ; Stockton House Drawing Room ; 
Little Langford Church S. Door ; Wishford Church, Grobham Monument ; 
Everley Church ; Amesbury House ; Great Durnford Church, N. and S. 
Doors,Font, Chancel Arch; Westbury Church, Ley Monument; Warminster 
Church S.E. ; Bishopstone Church (S. Wilts) S.E. and Sedilia ; Trafalgar 
House; Salisbury Cathedral, Gorges Monument; Berwick St. Leonard's 
Manor House ; Fonthill House ; Pyt House ; Whiteparish, Mansion of the 
St. Barbes. 



\ The Buckler Collection of Wiltshire Drawings. 189 

Wiltshire Drawings by Buckler in the British Museum. 

The authorities of the British Museum have very kindly given me the 
following list of drawings by Buckler, kept in the Department of MSS. (not 
in the Department of Prints and Drawings), extracted from the Catalogue 
of MS. Maps, 'Topographical Drawings, Sfc. They appear, judging from 
their titles, to be all duplicates of drawings in the series just acquired by 
the Society : — 

Britford Church, N.W. and S.E. Views, Altar Tomb. 

Harnham, East, Ancient Chapel N.E. View (St. John's Chapel on the 
Bridge ?). 

Harnham, West, Ancient Building, S.E. View. 

Salisbury, St. Edmund's Church, N.E. and S.W. Views (1803). 

Salisbury, St. Martin's Church, N.W. and S.E. Views. 

Salisbury, St. Nicholas' Hospital, S.E. and W. Views. 



List of Subscriptions to the Buckler Drawings Fund, 
May, 1918. 

£50 E. S. Wills. 

£25 W. Heward Bell ; W. J. E. Warry Stone. 

£20 Rev. E. H. Goddard. 

£10 Marquis of Lansdowne ; J. Moulton ; Hugh Morrison; Lord 

Ernest St. Maur ; Canon Wordsworth. 
£5 T. Arkell ; Major C. S. Awdry ; Marquis of Bath ; Capt. and Mrs. 

B. H. Cunnington; A. M. Dunne; G. P. Fuller; R. F. Fuller; 

Lord Glenconner ; Mrs. E. H. Goddard ; C. H. St. J. Hornby ; 

H. C. Moffatt; Sir Audley Neeld, Bart. ; Mrs. Newallj Brig.- 

Gen. G. LI. Palmer; Mrs. Story Maskelyne ; Miss Warrender ; 

Ed. Whitney. 
£3 Lord Fitzmaurice ; Hon. Louis Greville. 

£2 2s. E. O. P. Bouverie ; E. G. Troyte Bullock ; A. W. N. Burder ; Mrs. 

Colville ; S. B. Dixon ; Lord Gisborough ; Rev. W. Goodchild ; 

Emmanuel Green ; R. W. Merriman ; Canon Myers ; Basil E. 

Peto, M.P. ; T. A. J. Pile; Lord Round way ; John Sadler; 

Capt. J. E. Spicer ; Dr. G. S. A. Waylen. 
£2 Duke of Beaufort ; Miss Pleydell Bouverie ; Canon J. F. D. 

Stephens ; Baron de Tuyll. 
£1 Is. Lord Avebury ; E. C. Beaven ; Canon the Hon. B. P. Bouverie ; 

Rev. B. W. Bradford ; G. A. Burton ; Col. K. S. Dunsterville ; 

W. C. Edwards ; Rev. G. H. Engleheart ; R. S. Ferguson ; 

Edwin Giddings ; J. E. Gladstone; F. H. Goldney; W. 

Gough ; R. S. Gundry ; Rev. A. H. Harrison ; H. Linley 

Howlden ; J. T. Jackson ; Rev. H. E. Ketchley ; G. Knowles ; 

Canon Knubley ; W. F. Lawrence ; Rt. Hon. W. H. Long ; G. J. 

Main ; Marlborough Col. Nat. Hist. Soc. ; Preb. W. G. Clark 

Maxwell ; W. B. Medlicott ; Miss C. F. Miles ; Miss R. V. Naish ; 



190 Drawings of Wiltshire Churches by 0. B. Carter, 1847 — 50. 

J. A Neale ; A. B. Simpson ; J. H. Smith-Barry ; A. J. G. 

Stancomb; F, W. Stancomb; W. Stancomb ; Lt.-Col. W. K. Steele. 
£1 Lady Antrobus ; Sir Cosmo Antrobus, Bt. ; Admiral Sir C. J. 

Briggs ; Mrs. Buxton; Lt.-Col. A. Canning; Mrs. Canning ; 

Miss Clark ; H. W. Dartnell ; Rev. C. V. Goddard ; Lady Hope ; 

Canon Manley ; Miss Milman ; D. Owen; C. Penruddocke ;' 

Capt. A. P. Richardson ; Major C. H. de Rcemer ; A. Schomberg ; 

G. N. Temple ; J. Ashfordby Trenchard ; Rev. C. N. Wyld. 
10s. 6d. W. J. Andrew ; Capt. H. E. Holmes a Court, R.N. ; Rev. D. G. 

Barclay ; E. H. Thornton Lawes ; Canon F. W. Macdonald ; 

Canon Caldwell Masters ; Rev. T. Morrin ; H. Richardson ; 

Mrs. H. Richardson : Rev. A. W. Stote ; Canon T. J. Weight. 
10s. Miss F. E. Baker; Miss Bradford; Miss M. M. Bradford; Mrs. 

Dickins; Rev. Albert Goldsbrough ; Rev. S. Lambert; Canon 

Livingstone : C. F. Mc. Niven ; Mrs. Medlicott ; A. D. Passmore ; 

E. F. Pye-Smith ; Rev. C. A. Sladen ; E. H. Stone ; T. H. 

Thornely ; Rev. R. S. Weallens ; Y.Z. 
5s. Clem. Cole ; Rev. W. H. Hewlett Cooper ; C. R. Everett ; A. J. 

Gilbert ; Rev. Edgar Glanfield ; Miss R. A. Goddard; C. H. Gore ; 

Rev. J. A. Guillebaud ; Rev. GeoffryiHill ; Rev. P. H. Jackson ; 

Rev. H. G. O. Kendall; Rev. W. H. Lewis; J. Wood Lockett ; 

W. A. H. Masters ; Canon Mayo ; H. Messenger ; Miss Mitchell •> 

Canon Olivier; Miss Prower ; Rev. J. L. Redfern; Rev. Mills 

Robbins ; Rev. W. S. Tupholme ; W. W. ; W. A. Webb ; Miss 

Wilks ; A. E. Withy. 
2s. 6d. Miss Walsh. 

Total, £378 3s. 



Drawings of Wiltshire Churches by 0. B. Carter, 1847 — 50. 

An important set of sixty-three drawings of Wiltshire Churches (and of 
the Porch House, Potterne) have recently (May, 19 L7) been purchased from 
Mr. H. H. Bates, Bookseller, Castle Street, Salisbury, and presented to the 
Society's Library by the Rev. E. H. Goddard. They are all by Owen B. Carter, 
architect, of Winchester, and each is signed and dated, the dates ranging 
from 1847 to 1850. They were apparently intended for his ambitiously 
planned work, " Illustrations of the Churches of Wiltshire " in tinted 
lithography, of which ten numbers were intended, but four only were ever 
published. No. I., Bishops Cannings (three drawings), 7s. 6 d. ; No. II., 
Great Bedwyn, (four drawings), 9s. 6d., published Feb., 1852; and Parts 
III. and IV., in one number, Bishopstone, Steeple Ashton, Potterne, and 
Wilton, 15s. The drawings now presented to the Society are all beautifully 
finished measured architectural drawings in water colour. In three cases, 
Edington, Heytesbury, and Potterne, there are a double set of drawings — 
the smaller only slightly tinted, the larger fully coloured water colours. 
They consist of the following : — 



Drawings of Wiltshire Cliurches by 0. B. Carter, 1847 — 50, 191 

Amesbury Church [1849]. Four drawings. Ground Plan, S. Elevation, 

E. Elevation, and Section looking S. 
Bratton Church [1848]. Six drawings. Ground Plan, W. Elevation, 

Section looking S., Transverse Section looking E.,S. Elevation, Details 

of Windows and Tower Piers. 
Cricklade St. Sampson's Church [1850]. Four drawings. Ground 

Plan and Section of N. Aisle, N. Elevation, Section looking N., Section 

looking E. and Section of Nave looking E. 
Devizes St. John's Church [1850]. Four drawings. Ground Plan, 

Section looking N., N. Elevation, E. Elevation, and Section looking E. 
Devizes St. Mary's Church [1850]. Four drawings. Ground Plan, 

Section looking S., S. Elevation, W. and E. Elevations. 
Edington Church. Five smaller tinted drawings. [1847.] Ground 

Plan, Section looking N., S. Elevation, W. and E. Elevations, Section 

looking E. and Niches in Chancel. 

Nine larger and one smaller water colour drawings. 

[1847 to 1849.] Ground Plan ; W. Elevation ; S. Elevation; E. Elevation ; 
Section looking N. ; Transverse Section looking E. ; Sections and 
Mouldings ; Mouldings ; Niches in Chancel ; Remains on N. Side of 
Church, Canopy to Priest's Entrance, Bench End. 

Heytesbury Church. Four larger water colour drawings. [1848.] 
Ground Plan: Longitudinal Section looking N. ; W. Elevation and 
Transverse Section looking E. ; S. Elevation. 

Three smaller tinted drawings. [1849.] Ground Plan, 

Section looking N., S. Elevation. 

Patney Church. Several water colour drawings on one sheet. [1848.] 

Ground Plan, S.,W\, and E. Elevations, Longitudinal Section looking S., 

Transverse Section looking E., Details of Windows. 
Pott erne Church. Seven large water colour drawings. [1847.] Ground 

Plan, Transverse Section looking E., Longitudinal Section, E. Elevation, 

W. do., N. do., S. do. 

Four smaller tinted drawings. [1847.] Ground Plan and 

N. Elevation ; Sections looking S. and E. ; E. and W. Elevations ; 
Details Font, Buttress, &c. 

Potterne Porch House. Three water colour drawings. [1850.] Ground 
Plan and Half Elevation of Truss ; Front Elevation, Section, and Back 
Elevation ; Section, Sections of Hall and Porch, Chimneypiece and 
Barge Boards. 

Steeple Ashton Church. Four large water colour drawings. [1848.] 
Ground Plan and Mouldings; Longitudinal Section looking N. ; XV. 
Elevation and Transverse Section looking W. ; S. Elevation. 

[Canon Knubley has a set of these drawings of Steeple Ashton Church, 
which he also procured from Mr. Bates, apparently the sketches from which 
the more finished drawings were made.] 

As these drawings are mostly on stout board, they cannot be mounted in 
a scrap book, but have been placed in a portfolio, marked " Carter's 
Churches," by themselves in the Library. 



192 



WILTSHIRE DEEDS RECENTLY ACQUIRED. 

At the sale of the late Mrs. Collett's effects at the Priory, Bradford-on- 
Avon, in the autumn of 1917, one of the lots consisted of seven sacks of old 
parchment deeds, weighing about 5cwt., the debris of a solicitor's office. 
These were bought by a marine store dealer at Trowbridge for 50s., he having 
been in the habit of selling similar parchments before the War to Germans 
for manufacture into children's drums, tambourines, and other toys. Mr. 
John Moulton, of the Hall, Bradford-on-Avon, having heard of them, 
secured the refusal of them, got them transferred to his premises at Bradford, 
and through Mr. Burder drew the attention of the Hon. Secretary of the 
Society to the matter. Mr. Moulton himself was interested only in such 
of the deeds as concerned Bradford, but eventually bought the whole lot 
for £12 and agreed to divide the cost equally with the Society, the latter to 
have all the deeds, whether Wiltshire or not, which did not concern Bradford 
itself. It thus became necessary to sort and roughly catalogue the deeds, 
a work of considerable labour, for which expert knowledge was necessary. 
This work Canons E. P. Knubley and F. H. Manley, the Rev. A. W. Stote, 
and the Rev. C. W. Shickle, F.S.A., of Bath, undertook to do, the sacks of 
deeds being sent to them from Bradford. Eventually the non- Wilts deeds 
were sorted out, the larger number, connected with the County of Somerset, 
being bought by the Somerset Arch. Society for the Taunton Museum, a 
smaller parcel of Devon and Cornwall deeds going to the Albert Museum 
at Exeter, and others to various private purchasers, the receipts by these 
sales bringing in £12 17s. 6/., whilst the Society's expenditure was £6 I7s.6d. 
In addition Mr. J. Moulton has promised to present the great mass of the 
strictly Bradford deeds to the Society as well, keeping only such of them as 
prove specially interesting to himself. The Society owes its best thanks 
both to Mr. Moulton for his generous promise, and to the gentlemen 
mentioned above, whose labours made it possible to bring the matter to 
such a very satisfactory conclusion. The balance remaining in the Society's 
hands is particularly welcome, in as much as it nearly meets the charge of 
£7 incurred by the Museum Maintenance Fund for the carriage to Devizes 
of the very large collection of the deeds already owned by the Society which 
have for many years been in London in the hands of Mr. A. S. Maskelyne, 
of the Record Office, who most kindly edited many of them in the Magazine 
from time to time, and had made some progress in the great work of 
arranging and cataloguing them — a work which pressure of other calls of 
late years has prevented his completing. At present this great collection 
of deeds — containing a vast mass of as yet undigested material for the 
family history of the county — can be only temporarily stored away, but it 
is to be hoped that some member of the Society will in the future be willing 
to devote himself to the task of completing Mr. Story Maskelyne's work 
and rendering the whole collection available for genealogical and topo- 
graphical study. The Bev. C. W. IShickle very kindly transcribed and 
translated two Grittleton Court Rolls dated 1614—25, and 1625 — 48, which 
were amongst the Bradford deeds. 



193 



WILTS OBITUARY. 

Iit.-Col. Roger Alvin Poore, DSO ., killed in action, Sept., 
1917, whilst commanding a battalion of Welsh Fusiliers. Third s. of 
Major Robert Poore, of Old Lodge, Winterslow. Before joining the 
army he was articled to Mr. Hamilton Fulton, of Salisbury, as a 
solicitor. Served through South African War and gained the D.S.O. 
and Queen's Medal with seven clasps. Portrait, Sphere, Dec. 8th, 1917. 

Oapt. Henry Colt Arthur Hoare, Yeomanry, died Dec. 20th, 
from wounds received Nov. 14th, 1917, aged 29. B. A. Trinity Coll., 
Camb., 1910. 

Obit, notice, Wiltshire Gazette, Dec. 27th, 1917. 

Capt. Christopher Ken Merewether, Wilts Regt ., died, 

Dec. 19th, of wounds received Nov. 13th. B. at. N. Bradley Vicarage, 
1890. Only child of Rev. W. A. S. Mere wether, Vicar of St. Thomas', 
Salisbury, formerly Vicar of North Bradley and Bradford-on-Avon. 
Educated at St. Aubyn's, Rottingdean, Winchester College, and 
Oriel College, Oxon. Held an appointment with White Star Line, of 
Liverpool, and commanded the Bradford-on-Avon half-company of 
Territorials. On the outbreak of war he joined the Wiltshire Regt., 
with which he had served since Aug., 1914. He was good at all games, 
played in his college eleven and for Oxford against Cambridge at 
hockey. 
Obit, notices, Times, Dec. 29th, 1917 ; Wiltshire Gazette, Jan. 3rd, 1918. 

Capt. James Henry Orr, RGr A, of Bradford-on-Avon, killed 
in action in France, Nov. 30th, 1917, aged 30. Chartered accountant, 
served his articles with Messrs. Curtis, Jenkin, & Co., Bristol. Ap- 
pointed Senior Assistant Auditor in Nat. Insurance Audit Department 
Nov., 1912, and attached to Trowbridge district. Joined "Bristol's 
Own" Battalion January, 1915, gained commission in Wessex Cycling 
Corps in 1915, served in France, was transferred to artillery and pro- 

!moted captain Oct., 1917. He leaves a widow and one daughter. 
Obit, notice, Wiltshire Times, Dec. 15th, 1917. 

Capt. H. C. Clark, M.C, Wilts Regt., died Feb. 7th, 1918, from 

wounds received in action on Feb. 5th. Eldest s. of Mrs. W. P. Clark, 

Wyke House, Trowbridge. Married, Nov., 1917, Dorothy, d. of the 

late J. H. Foley. 

Obit, notices, Wiltshire Gazette and Wilts Advertiser, Feb. 28th, 1918. 

Capt- Edward Charles Cunnington, R.A.M.C., aged 27. 

Killed at the front while tending the wounded, March 23rd, 1918. 
Only child of Captain B. Howard Cunnington, of Devizes. Educated 
at Reading and Cambridge. A student at St. Bartholomew's Hospital, 
he volunteered for military service at the outbreak of the war. 

Obit, notices, Times, April 8th, Wiltshire Gazette, April 11th, 1918. 



194 Wilts Obituary. 

Capt. George G. P. Greville, Hussars. Killed in action in 
France, March 31st, 1918, aged 28. Only s. of Hon. Louis Greville, of 
Heale House, Woodford. Born March, 1890. Educated at Wixenford 
and Eton. Second-Lieut. Warwickshire Yeomanry, July, 1909, com- 
missioned in Hussars, 1912, went to France, Aug., 1914, was in the 
retreat from Mons, and served continuously in France until his death. 
Lieutenant, Dec, 1914 ; Capt., March, 1918. 

Obit, notices, Times, April 15th ; Salisbury Journal, April 13th, 1918. 

Lieut. T. H. Fogg, R.E. Killed in action, in France, March 25th, 
1918, aged 35. Had been in business at Chippenham since 1911, as 
architect, surveyor, and land agent, was a member of the Town Council, 
choirmaster at the Roman Catholic Church, and took an active part in 
many local matters. 

Obit, notices, Wiltshire Gazette, April 11th; Wiltshire Times, April 
13th, 1918. 

Iiient. H. C. V. Sharps, Rifle Brigade. Killed in France, May 21st, 
1918. S. of R. Sharps, Manor Farm, Seagry, on outbreak of war he 
joined the King's Own Hussars, and was transferred to the Gloucester 
Regt. Served through Gallipoli campaign, and was invalided home 
with frost-bite. Gained commission in Rifle Brigade, and went to 
France, Oct., 1917. 
Obit, notice, Wiltshire Times, May 11th, 1918. 

Lieut. George Spencer, London Regt., attached Rifle Brigade. 
Died, Dec. 4th, 1917, of wounds received near Cambrai, aged 31. Only 
s. of Alex. Spencer, Managing Director of Spencer, Moulton, & Co., 
Bradford-on- Avon. Educated at Beckenham, Winchester College, and 
London University. Entered the firm's works at Bradford, became a 
director and was associated with the London office. Joined London 
Regt. (Artists Rifles), gained commission 1915, went to France, Oct., 

1916, was invalided home, returned to front Sept., 1917. He leaves a 
widow but no children. 

Obit, notices, Wiltshire Gazette, Dec. 13th, Wiltshire Times, Dec. 15th, 
1917. 

Lieut. Percival George Havelock Hunt, killed in action, 

in France, Nov. 9th, 1917, aged 26. Only s. of George Havelock Hunt, 
of Calne. Joined 4th Wilts in Dec, 1914, was transferred to 8th Batt., 
received commission in 1916, went to the front, was wounded early in 

1917, returned to front, promoted lieutenant. 
Obit, notice, Wiltshire Gazette, Nov. 15th, 1917. 

Lieut. Alister Douglas Stewart, RFC. Educated at Rhyl 

and Cheltenham College. Trained as land agent at Royal Agricultural 
Coll., Cirencester. Married, 1914, Dorothy Stella, d. of Sydney Adams, 
of Petersfleld. 

Obit, notice, Wiltshire Gazette, Nov. 1st, 1917. 



Wilts Obituary, 195 

2nd Lieut. Harold Jones, R.F.C , killed in action in France, 
Nov., 1917, aged 18. Eldest s. of Edward Jones, High St., Malmesbury. 
He had considerable musical talent. 

Obit, notice, Wiltshire Gazette, Nov. 29th, 1917. 

2nd Lieut. Gr. V. Blake, attached to King's Shropshire Light 
Infantry, killed in action in France, Dec. 3rd, 1917, aged 32. Fourth 
s. of the late Henry Blake, of Elmhurst, Hilperton Road, Trowbridge. 
Practised as solicitor at Oswestry. Leaves a widow and one child. 
Obit, notice, Wiltshire Gazette, Dec. 20th, 1917. 

2nd Lieut. Edward Basil Anstie, Rifle Brigade, killed in 

action in France, March 23rd, 1918. Son. of Capt. G. E. Anstie, of the 
Wilts Regt., and grandson of E. B. Anstie, of Devizes. B. 1898, 
educated at Farnborough and Repton, scholar of New Coll., Oxon. 
Gazetted to Rifle Brigade June, 1917, went to the front June, 1917. 
Obit, notice, Wiltshire Gazette, April 11th, 1918. 

2nd Lieut. R. G. Simmons. Killed in action in France, March 
23rd, 1918. Of Little Somerford. Educated at Malmesbury Secondary 
School and Armstrong College, Newcastle. On the outbreak of war 
he enlisted in the 22nd Royal Fusiliers, served in France, Nov., 1915 — 
January, 1917, gaining the M.M. for conspicuous gallantry in the 
fighting on the Somme. Commissioned in 11th Royal Fusiliers, 1917, 
and served with the Regt. from Sept., 1917, until his death. 
Obit, notice, Wiltshire Gazette, April 11th, 1918. 

Rev, Oswald AddenbrOOke Holden, Chaplain to the Forces, 
killed in action in France, Dec. 1st, aged 43. S. of Rev. Oswald 
Margin Holden, Rector of Steeple Langford, 1900—1917. B., 1874, at 
Kingswinford. Educated at Rossall and scholar of Exeter Coll., Oxon. 
B.A., 1897 ; M.A., 1900 ; deacon, 1898 ; priest, 1899 (Lichfield). Curate 
of Stoke-on-Trent, 1898—1902 ; Rector of Calstone Willington with 
Blacklands, 1902-1907 ; Vicar of Penn (Staffs.) 1907 until his death. 
Married Miss Beresford, 1900, who, with two sons, survives him. As 
Rector of Calstone he was well known in the Calne neighbourhood 
and greatly esteemed. The Senior Chaplain of the Division writes in 
the Times, Dec. 27th, 1917: "It is impossible to say how much his 
loss is felt. There is nobody in the division whose death has caused 
more grief. He had an immense hold on his brigade and beyond its 
limits." 

Obit, notices, Times, Dec. 11th; Wiltshire Gazette, Dec. 20th, 1917. 
Portrait, Daily Sketch, April 13th, 1918. 

Rev. Cyril NarramoreWere, Chaplain to Forces, died suddenly 
on active sei vice, January, 1 918. Second s. of lit. Rev. Edward AstuW ere, 
Bishop of Derby. B. at N. Bradley,1881, when his father was Yicar 1880 
—1885. Ch. Ch., Oxford, B.A., 1903 ; M.A., 1907 ; deacon, 1904 ; priest, 
1905 (Winchester). Curate of Bramshott, 1904 — 07 ; Rector of Samford 



196 Wilts Obituary. 

Brett, 1907—08 ; Curate of Addlestone, 1909—11 ; Domestic Chaplain 
to Bp. of Lichfield, 1911 — 13 ; Domestic Chaplain to Bp. of Southwark. 
He had been at the front a month, in succession to the Rev. O. A. H olden, 
killed in action. Married, 1907, Mildred Gladys Tripp and leaves a son, 
Obit, notices, Wiltshire Gazette, Feb. 21st; Wiltshire Times, Feb. 
23rd, 1918. 

Hev Evelyn Holt Davies, B. A., B.D. Died in France, March, 
1918. In 1916 he responded to the appeal of the Y.M.C.A. and went 
to France to work among the soldiers in the huts. He had been for 
two-and-a-half years minister of the Westport Congregational Church, 
Malmesbury, at which a very largely-attended memorial service was held. 
Obit, notice, Wiltshire Times, March 30th, 1918. 

Hermione Rogers, drowned at sea, January, 1918. Eldest d. of Mr. 
and Mrs. Newman Rogers, of Rainscombe, near Pewsey. Left school 
Easter, 1914 ; worked as V.A.D. nurse at the Pewsey Red Cross Hospital 
Aug. 1914 to 1916, when the hospital was closed ; volunteered for general 
Home or Foreign service ; served at Sutton Veny Hospital till Oct.. 
1917, whe she was transferred to Dover and from thence to Egypt. 
The ship, which was conveying a large party of nurses, was torpedoed 
in the M editerranean and she was drowned. 

Obit, notices, Wiltshire Gazette, Jan. 17th and 24th, 1918. 

Sir John Alexander Miller, 3rd Bart. Died at Newmarket, 

Feb. 16th, 1918. Buried at Newmarket Cemetery. B. Sept. 26th, 1867, 
third s. of first baronet and brother of second baronet, whom he 
succeeded 1906. J. P. and D.L. for Haddingtonshire; J. P. for East 
Kent. Formerly Captain in Lothian and Berwickshire Yeomanry. 
Married, first, 1889, Inez Mary, d. of Will. Mitchell Innes (marriage 
dissolved) ; second, 1901, Ada Mary, d. of Francis Hen. Paget ; third, 
1907, Eveling Frances, d. of John Blencowe Cookson, C.B. He leaves 
no children and the baronetcy expires. Well known as a racing man. 
Lived at Heywood House 1903 to 1914. Took prominent part as a 
Unionist in political matters in W. Wilts. A keen cricketer, he did 
much for the Westbury Cricket Club, and was generous in other ways. 
Long obit, notice, Wiltshire Times, Feb. 23rd, 1918, with portrait. 

Sir Richard Hungerford Pollen, Bart , of Rodbourne, died 

May 5th, 1918. Buried at Rodbourne. B. 1846. S. of Sir Richard 
Hungerford Pollen, whom he succeeded, 1881. Educated at Eton and 
Ch. Ch., Oxford. Served some years with 4th Gloucestershire Militia, 
retiring as Lt.-Col. Married, 1875, Frances Anne St. Albyn, eldest d. 
of Will. Savage Wait, of Woodborough, near Bath, who, with two sons 
and a daughter, survives him. He served on a great number of County 
boards and committees, was a member of the County Council, chairman 
of Malmesbury Board of Guardians, Malmesbury Petty Sessions, vice- 
chairman of the N. Wilts Conservative Association, and churchwarden 
of Malmesbury Abbey Church for many years. He is succeeded in the 
title by his eldest son, Richard Hungerford Pollen. 
Obit, notice, Wiltshire Gazette, May 9th, 1918. 



Wilts Obituary. 197 

Major Robert Poore, died Jan. 22nd, 191 8. Buried at Durrington. 
B.at Naples, May 5th, 1834. S. of Robert Montagu Poore, commissioned 
in 8th Hussars, with which he served in Turkey and Central India, 
Retired 1 864. Married, 1 863, Juliana Benita, daughter of Rear Admiral 
Armar Lowry Corry, by whom he had four sons and three daughters. 
Of the sons the eldest is Brig. Gen. Robert Montagu Poore, D.S.O., 
7th Hussars. The third son, Lt.-Col. Roger Alvin Poore, D.S.O., 
R.W.Y., was killed in action Sept., 1917. The eldest daughter married 
the late Sir Alexander Wilson ; the second, Sir Harold Pelly ; the 
third, the Duke of Hamilton. Major Poore was for many years a 
member of the Oounty Council ; since about 1 870 he had lived at Old 
Lodge, Winterslow, and his energies were devoted to the benefit of 
the people of Winterslow, the whole condition of which has been altered 
for the better by the system of small proprietorship, which— together 
with a land court — was instituted by him in 1892, and became widely 
known and commented on throughout England by land reformers as a 
pioneer movement which set an example to the rest of the country. 
Nearly forty houses have been built, over forty persons own land, and 
the balance in the hands of the court stands at £1530. 

Obit, notices, Salisbury Journal, Jan. 26th ; Wiltshire Gazette, with 
some notes on the Poore family, Jan. 31st, 1918. 

Rev. the Hon. John Horatio Nelson, died Nov. 28th, 1817, 

aged 92. Buried at Shaw (Berks). Born 1825. Second s. of the second Earl 
Nelson, and brother of the third Earl, who died 1913. Trin. Coll , Camb. 
M.A. 1846. Deacon, 1847 ; priest, 1848. Curate of Eartham (Sussex), 
1847-51; Speen (Berks), 1851—53; Rector of Trimley St. Matthew 
(Suffolk), 1853—57; Belaugh with Scottow (Norf.), 1857— 72 ; Shaw 
with Donnington (Berks), 1872 — 1909, when he resigned and came to 
live at Lords Oak, Landford. Married, 1857, Susan, eldest d. of Lord 
Charles Spencer Churchill. He had two sons, John Eyre, d. 1913, 
and Horatio Spencer, b. 1860. 

Obit, notice, Salisbury Journal, Oct. 6th, 1917. 

ReV- Robert Mayo, died Feb. 3rd, 1918, aged 85. Buried at 
Corsham. Eldest s. of Dr. T. Mayo, President of Royal Coll. of 
Physicians. Ch. Ch., Oxford. B.A. 1856. Deacon, 1857 ; priest, 1858 
(Norwich). Curate of Barnham Broom with Kimberley (Norfolk), 1857 
—60; Ovington (Hants), 1864—67; Soberton (Hants), 1869. Retired 
and lived at Corsham, 1870 until his death. A generous supporter of 
Corsham institutions, where he was greatly respected. 

Obit, notices, Wiltshire Gazette, Feb. 7th ; Wiltshire Times, Feb. 
9th, 1918. 

Rev. William Starkie Shuttle worth, died Jan. 1st, i9i8,at 

Salisbury. Trin. Coll., Camb. B.A., 1862 ; M.A., 1865. Deacon, 
1862; priest, 1863 (Oxford). Curate of Caversham, 1862—65; St. 
Edmund's, Salisbury, 1865—70; Chaplain, Salisburylnfirmary,1870 - 7 1 ; 
Vicar of Bramshaw (Hants), 1871—78 ; Curate of Trinity, Weymouth, 



198 Wilts Obituary. 

1878—83; St. Mary Magd., Wandsworth Common, 1884 — 89; Vicar 
there, 1889—97; Vicar of Shalbourne, 1897—1905. 
Obit, notice, Wiltshire Gazette, Jan. loth, 1918. 

Rev. Arthur Wellesley Batson, died December, 1 91 7, aged 65. 
S, of Alfred Batson, of the Rookery, Ramsbury. St. Alban's Hall, 
Oxon. Bachelorof Music, 1878. Cuddesdon Theol. Coll., 1880. Deacon, 
1881 (Heref.) ; priest, 1882 (Oxf.). Curate of Whitbourne, 1881—82 ; 
St. Anne, Soho, 1882—86; Rector of Ringstead, 1888—1902. 
Obit, notice, Wiltshire Gazette, J an. 3rd, 1918. 

B>eV. Francis DeCOmpoiX, died Dec. 6th, 1917, aged 93. Buried 
at Malmesbury Cemetery. B. Aug. 4th, 1824, at Bons, Chablais, Savoy. 
Educated at Colleges of Thonon, Evian les Bains, La Koche,and Annecy, 
where he joined the Society of Missionaries of Francis de Sales. Or- 
dained priest, 1849, he became a missionary in the Central Provinces, 
India, where he worked in Vizagapatam for seventeen years. On Dec. 
6th, 1866, he took charge of the new Roman Catholic Church and 
mission at Devizes (founded in 1861). In 1885 he moved to Malmesbury 
and took charge of the mission there. Of late years he had lived at St. 
Aldhelm'sPresbytery, Malmesbury, where he died. 

Long and very appreciative obit, notice, Wiltshire Gazette, Dec. 20th ; 
Wiltshire Advertiser, Dec. 27th, 1917. 

Walter Edward Xing, died Nov, 30th, 1917, aged 80. Fourth s. 
of the Rev. Will. Moss King, Rector of Long Crichel, Dorset. Educated 
at Charterhouse. Served in the Diplomatic Service in China and was 
on the Earl of Elgin's special commission. Consul at Tainan, 1876 ; 
I chang, 1877; and retired in 1878. J.P. for Wilts and formerly a 
member of the County Council. Had long lived at Donhead Lodge, 
Donhead St. Andrew. 

Obit, notice, Wiltshire Gazette, Dec. 6th ; Wiltshire Advertiser, Dec. 
20th, 1917. 

Cuithbert Isiliay Nicholson, died Jan. 22nd, 1 918, aged 61. Buried 
in Devizes Cemetery. Third s. of John Nicholson, of Wimbledon. Edu- 
cated at Rugby. In business with his brother Herbert as tea and 
coffee merchants. In 1902 he retired from business, purchased Nursteed 
Lodge, on the outskirts of Devizes, and had lived there since. He had 
acted as military representative at the tribunal for the Devizes district 
since the passing of the Military Service Act. He was a keen gardener 
and fruit grower. He married Louisa Alexandrina, d. of John Turner, 
of Wimbledon, who with one son and two daughters, survives him. 

Obit, notices, Wiltshire Gazette and Wiltshire Advertiser, Jan 24th, 
1918. 

John Russell POX, died at Devizes, Feb. 5th, 1918. Cremated. 
Eldest s. of J. J. Fox, draper, of Devizes. Born May,1831. Apprenticed 
to W. Burrows, Editor of the Wiltshire Independent, published in 
Devizes. He afterwards went to Andover and' set up business as 



Wilts Obituary, 199 

bookseller and stationer and started the Andover Advertiser. In 1862 
he returned to Devizes and became proprietor and editor of the Wiltshire 
Independent, and continued to edit and publish the paper until 1876, 
when it became absorbed in the Wiltshire Times. He served on the 
town councils of Andover and Devizes, and was a guardian for twenty- 
one years. He also sat on the Wilts County Council for three years, 
and afterwards remained a member of the Education Committee of 
the council. He was keenly interested in educational matters. He 
became J. P. for Wilts some years ago, but the infirmities of age pre- 
vented his acting. He was a keen fisherman and was one of the founders 
of the Devizes Angling Association. He married, 1856, Harriet Collen, 
of Chippenham, by whom he had nine children, two sons and four 
daughters surviving him. In past years he took a prominent part as 
a Liberal in Devizes. 

Long obit, notices, Wiltshire Gazette and Wiltshire Advertiser, Feb. 
7th, 1918. 

William Browne Canning 1 , of Bemerton House, died Oct. 18th, 
1 917, aged 69. Buried at Bemerton. Since 1 884 he had been a member 
of the firm of Rawlence <fc Squarey, land agents and valuers, of Salisbury. 
As an agricultural valuer his services were in great request. He leaves 
two daughters, one of whom is the wife of the Rev. E. R. Z. Walker, 
Vicar of Lyneham. 
Obit, notice, Salisbury Journal, Oct. 20th, 1917. 

William Fritchard, died Oct. 30th, 1917, aged 74. Buried at 
London Road Cemetery, Salisbury. Born at Devizes, he lived most of 
his life at Salisbury, where he had a drapery business near the Poultry 
Cross until he retired in 1900. A Town Councillor in 1901 and Mayor 
1911, he took a prominent part in municipal matters at Salisbury, and 
was for many years a deacon of the Baptist Church in Brown Street. 
A Liberal and prominent Nonconformist, he was much respected. 
Obit, notice, Salisbury Journal, Nov. 3rd, 1917. 

Charles Robert Straton, F.R.C.S., F.E.S., died at West Lodge, 
Wilton, Feb. 22nd, 1918, aged 75. Buried at Wilton. Born at Edinburgh, 
1842. Began life in a solicitor's office, but afterwards took up medicine. 
He received his medical education at Glasgow, Edinburgh, and London, 
and obtained the degrees of L.R.C.S. and L.R.C.P. (Edinburgh), 1866 ; 
F.R.C.S. (Edinburgh), 1882 ; and L.S.Sc. (Durham), 1889. He was a 
Fellow of the Royal Society of Medicine. Joined his uncle in medical 
practice at Steeple Langford, and after a short time settled at Wilton, 
where he lived until his death, with a large medical practice. He took 
a prominent part in public work at Wilton, was a member of the Old 
Corporation, and served as mayor in 1874, 1880, and 1884. From 1873 
to his death he was Medical Officer for the Rural District of Wilton, 
and for a somewhat shorter period for the Urban District also. His 
unusual knowledge of medico-legal questions made him a prominent 
member on committees of the British Medical Association, of the 

VOL. XL. — NO. CXVIII. P 



200 Wilts Obituary. 

Southern Branch of which he was President in 1900. A Unionist in 
politics, an earnest and active churchman, a most kind and genial 
friend, he filled a large place in the life of Wilton, and was greatly 
esteemed by rich and poor alike. In Salisbury he was known as the 
Treasurer of the Salisbury Field Club, and more especially for his work in 
connection with the Salisbury and S. Wilts Museum for the last 48 years. 
He became the Hon. Curator of the Botanical Collection there in 1872, 
and in 1877 he was associated with Dr. Blackmore as Hon. Curator of 
Natural History, a post which he held until his death. The Natural 
History collections, and indeed the whole of the Salisbury Museum, owes 
much to his constant work and interest. He was especially responsible 
for the collection of Land and Freshwater Shells, and from 1887 to 1905 
he gave at least eleven lectures at the museum, almost all of which 
were on Natural History subjects, of which his knowledge was extensive. 
As a member of the Wilts Archaeological Society he rendered much 
help on occasions when the Society met at Wilton and Salisbury. Of 
his literary works a list is given below. He married, 1875, Amy Mary, 
eldest d. of H. J. F. Swayne, of Wilton, who died 1895. He leaves 
four sons. 

Long obit, notice, Salisbury Journal, March 2nd, 1918. 

BlBLIOGEAPHICAL LlST OF HIS WRITINGS. 

Alternating Generations. A Biological Study of Oak Galls 
and Gall Flies. By Hermann Adler, M.D., Schleswig. 
Translated and Edited by Charles R. Straton, F.R.C.S., 
Ed. F.E.S. With Illustrations. Oxford, at the Clarendon 
Press, 1894. 

Post8vo. Buckram, pp. xliii + 198, including index. Two folding 
coloured plates, one uncoloured, cuts in text. 10s. 6d. Noticed, 
Wilts Arch. Mag., xxviii., 175—177. 

Oak Galls and Gall Flies. . Salisbury Field Club Trans., I., 139— 158. 
Lecture at the Museum, 1890. Three folding plates. 

Witches' Brooms (Botanical, &c). Wilts Arch. Mag.,xxix., 147—159. 

An English Manor in the time of Elizabeth. Lecture at the 
Salisbury Museum. Wilts Arch. Mag., xxxii. 288 [one plate]. Also 
printed in full in Salisbury Journal, Feb. 22nd, 1902. 

The Proper Treatment of the Animal Creation. The Rowland 
Rodway Lecture on the Motives which have influenced 
Men in their Treatment of Animals at different epochs, 
delivered by Charles R. Straton, F.R. C.S.Ed. F.E.S., in 
St. James' Hall, Trowbridge, on Thursday, May 29th, 
1902. For gratuitous circulation in the Parish of 
Trowbridge. 

Pamphlet, 8vo. pp. 3.1 . Printed by R. J. Massey & Co., Trowbridge. 
This is the sixth of a triennial series of lectures, the endowment for 
which was left by the late Mr. Rowland Rodway. 

Survey of the Lands of William, First Earl of Pembroke. 
Transcribed from Vellum Rolls in the possession of the 
Earl of Pembroke and Montgomery. With an Intro- 
duction by the Transcriber, Charles R. Straton, F.R.C.S., 
F.E.S., Fellow of the Royal Society of Medicine, and a 
Preface by the Earl of Pembroke and Montgomery. 
Oxford: Privately printed for presentation to the mem- 
bers of the Roxburgh Club. MCMIX. 



Wilts Obituary. 201 

Two vols., ll^in. X 9in. Printed at the University Press. 

Vol. I., pp. xcix. (of which the Introduction fills pp. xvii-xcix.) 
-f 314. 

Vol. II., title, contents, and list of illustrations, pp. 6 (unnumbered) 
+ 317—624. 

The actual work of transcription of this large work was for the 
most part done by Mr. T. H. Baker, of Salisbury. The " Introduction" 
is one of Mr. Straton's most important works. For notices see The 
Reliquary, Oct., 1909, vol. xv., 279 (by Dr. Cox.); Guardian, Sept. 
22nd, 1909; and Wilis Arch. Mag., xxxvi., 343—345. 
The Great Bustard. Festival Book of Salisbury, 1914, pp. 11—13. 
One plate. 

[The following Lectures at Salisbury Museum were printed in full 

in the Salisbury papers.] 
Fruits and Seeds, their Structure and Means of Distribution. 

Salisbury Journal, March 23rd, 1895. 
Insects and Insect Life. Ibid, March 27th, 1897. 
Leaves. Wilts County Mirror, Dec. 2nd, 1898. 
Birds in Motion. Salisbury Journal, March 26th, 1904. 
Sundials and their Mottoes. Ibid, March 17th, 1906. 

[He also lectured on " Plants and Animals " (1887) ; " Mosses and 

Fungi " (1889) ; " The Ear and Hearing" (1893).] 

He was also the author of : — 
" Dangers to be guarded against in Village Water Supply." 
" Value of Attractive Characters to Fungi." Nature, 1890 ? 
" Pre-choreic Stages of Chorea." B.M.S., 1885. 
" Ethics of Secrecy in the Learned Professions." 1900. 

Joseph Williams ZiOVibond, died April 21 st, 191 8, aged 84. 
Buried in London Road Cemetery, Salisbury. B. Nov. 17th, 1833. 
Third s. of John Locke Lovibond, of Long Sutton, Som. Educated 
privately, entered Mercantile Marine, 1846, engaged in gold mining in 
California. Returned to England, 1854, and joined Lovibond's Brewery, 
Greenwich. When the firm bought a brewery at Salisbury he came to 
live there. He was Mayor of Salisbury 1877 and 1889, a member 
of the Town Council from 1872 to 1901, and an alderman from 1890. 
J. P. for Salisbury, 1897, and later for Wilts. He sat on the County 
Council for a time. He bought Lake House, from the Duke family, 
and restored it with the greatest possible care ; indeed the restoration 
under Mr. Detmar Blow was spoken of as a model of what " restoration" 
should be. For some years he lived in the house, but afterwards let it 
and lived in a smaller house, " The Fleasaunce," which he built at Lake. 
After the disastrous fire he again restored the house. He married, 
1858, Charlotte, d. of Edward Steer, of Crockham Hill, Kent. Three 
daughters survive him, one of whom has for many years successfully 
carried on the " Stonehenge Woollen Industry " at Lake, by which 
excellent cloth is made in the village. Mr. Lovibond will be remem- 
bered as the inventor of the " Tintometer," an instrument for measuring 
tints, &c, which he patented and which is in universal use now in the 
oil and other industries of the world. At the Brussels Exhibition, 1910, 
he gained two gold and one silver medal ; these medals were awarded 
by the Royal Sanitary Association for apparatus dealing with sanitary 

p 2 



202 Additions to the Library. 

hygiene and colour education ; a silver and two bronze medals at the 
St. Louis Exposition, 1904 ; and other medals at Turin and Panama 
Exhibitions for his work on Light and Colour. Of late he had carried 
out at Lake experiments in " Camouflage " for the War Office, and the 
colour schemes adopted for the protection of huts, guns, &c, are largely 
based on his investigations. His published works include " Light and 
Colour Measurement," " Colour Phenomena," " Colour Theories," " The 
Teacher's Handbook of Colour." 

Obit notices, Salisbury Journal, April 27th ; Wiltshire Gazette^ May 
2nd, 1918. 

Col. Charles Napier Miles, C.B., JH.V.O., died May 

25th, 1918, aged 64, buried at Dauntsey. B. April 9th, 1854. Eldest 
s. of Col. Charles William Miles, of Burton Hill, Malmesbury (after- 
wards "Ingleburne Manor"). Educated at Eton. Lieut. 1st Life 
Guards, 1875, Capt. 1882, Major 1895, brevet Lieut.-Col. 1895. Served 
in Egyptian Campaign 1882, in all the chief actions ; commanded the 
composite Regiment of Household Cavalry in S. African War in the 
Transvaal and Orange Free State, tie was mentioned in despatches 
and received the C.B. He commanded the 1st Life Guards 1895—1902. 
M.Y.O. 1901. Retired 1906. High Steward of Malmesbury 1892 until 
his death. J. P. for Wilts 1880, he had just been appointed chairman 
of the Malmesbury bench. He had given the Manor House, opposite 
his residence, as a Red Cross hospital. He was chairman of the tribunal. 
A strong Conservative in politics, and had served as churchwarden at 
the Abbey Church. He was widely known as a hunting man and a 
country gentleman and was popular and respected at Malmesbury. He 
played in the Eton Eleven 1871, 1872. He married, 1880, Emily, d. of 
J. W. G. Spicer, of Spye Park. 

Obit, notice, Wiltshire Gazette, May 30th, 1918. 



ADDITIONS TO THE LIBRARY. 

Presented by The Author, Rev. J. Gill Ward, Vicar of Avebury : " The 
World Drama in Revelation and History." 1917. 
„ Mr. H. St. G. Gray : " A Plea for an old Wilts Charity, or 
Reasons against Alienation of the real property in Upton 
Scudamore belonging to Stockton Almshouse. By Rev. 
J. Baron." 1877. 
„ „ Lady Antrobus : Portrait, Lt. Edmund Antrobus. 
„ „ Rev. A. T. Richardson : Portrait of Gen. H. Shrapnell and 
plate of Shrapnell Monument. 



Additions to the Library. 203 

Presented by Mr. Edward Slow : " A Wilton Lady's Impressions of 
Australians." 1917. 

,. „ The Author, Lady Glenconner : " The Sayings of the 
Children, written down by their Mother." 1918. 

„ „ Miss Pearl Edmunds : A large number of back numbers of 
the Wilts Arch. Magazine. 

„ „ Mr.A.D.Passmore : Wilts Illustrations; five series of'Poems"; 
and " Verses for Sundials," by T. G. W. Henslow. 

„ „ Mr. Colin Mitchell (the Author): "Trampled Clay." 1917- 

„ „ Mr. C. Penruddocke : " Wilts and some Neighbouring 
Records Historical, Biographical, and Pictorial." AHan 
North. 4to. 

„ „ Mr. J. J. Slade : Several Wilts Instate Sale Particulars. 
Catalogue of the Morrison Autograph Letters. " Britton's 
Picturesque Antiquities of the English Cities." " Ancient 
Hunters and their Modern Representatives," Sollas. 1911. 

„ „ Mrs. Story Maskelyne: Article by N.Story Maskelyne, 1851. 

„ „ Rev. A. W. Stote : Trowbridge and Holy Trinity Monthly 
Magazine for 1913 — 17. Bound vol. 

„ „ Rev. J. W. S. Tomlin : Twenty numbers of "St. Boniface 
College (Warminster) at Home and Abroad." 

„ „ The Author (Rev. T. J. Lawrence), L.L.D., Rector of 
Upton Lovel : '* The Effect of the War on International 
Law." 

„ „ Mr. A. W. Marks : Copy of a Terrier of Alvediston. Survey 
of Vicarial Tithe of Bowerchalke, 1813. Several deeds 
relating to Broughton Gifford, &c. 

„ „ Mr. A. Schomberg : Drawings of Cheney Court, Notton 
Dovecot, Southwick Court, and Swinley, in Kington St. 
Michael (reproduced in Wilts N. Sf Q.). Seend Monu- 
mental Inscriptions. 1917. Two typed copies of news- 
paper articles. 

„ „ Mr. F. Stevens : Eleven An. Reports of Salisbury Museums 
and MS. account of the Museum from its foundation. 
Souvenir and Guide Book for Australian and New Zealand 
Soldiers. . 

„ „ Mr. D. Owen : Eight years' Reports of Wilts Friendly Society. 

„ „ Rev. E. H. Goddard : Forbes & Hanley's "British Mollusca." 
4 vols. Tripp's " British Mosses," 2 vols. Cooke's " In- 
troduction to the Study of Fungi." A number of Wiltshire 
pamphlets, illustrations, &c. 



204 



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THE SOCIETY'S PUBLICATIONS (Continued). 

STONEHENGE AND ITS BARROWS, by W. Long, Nos. 46-47 of the 

Magazine in separate wrapper, 7s. 6d. This still remains the best and most 
reliable account of Stonehenge and its Earthworks. 

WILTSHIRE— The TOPOGRAPHICAL COLLECTIONS OF JOHN 
AUBREY, F.R.S., A.D. 1659-1670. Corrected and enlarged by the Rev. 
Canon J. E. Jackson, M.A., F.S.A. 4to, Cloth, pp. 491, with 46 plates. 
Price jG2 10s. 

WILTSHIRE INQUISITIONES POST MORTEM. CHARLES I. 8vo, 
pp. vii. -f- 501. 1901. With full index. In 8 parts, as issued. Price 13s. 

DITTO. IN THE REIGNS OF HEN. III., ED. I., and ED. II. 8vo 
pp. xv., 505. In parts as issued. Price 13s. 

DITTO. FROM THE REIGN OF ED. III. 8vo., pp. 402. In six 

parts as issued. Price 13s. 

A BIBLIOGRAPHY or the GREAT STONE MONUMENTS of 
WILTSHIRE, STONEHENGE and AYEBUltY, with other references, 
by W. Jerome Harrison, F.G.S., pp. 169, with 4 illustrations. No. 89, Dec, 
1901, of the Magazine. Price 5s. 6d. Contains particulars as to 947 books, 
papers, &c, by 732 authors, 

TBE TROPENELL CARTULARY. An important work in 2 vols., 8vo, 
pp. 927, containing a great number of deeds connected with property in many 
Wiltshire Parishes of the 14th and 15th centuries. Only 150 copies were 
printed, of which a few are left. Price to members, £1 10s., and to non- 
members, £ c l. 



WILTSHIRE MAMMALS, BIRDS, & REPTILES. 

Mr. G B. Hony, 4, Beaufort Boad, Clifton, Bristol, will be 
greatly obliged if members would kindly send Mm notice of 
the occurrence of any rare birds within the borders of the 
County, or of the occurrence of unusual mammals or reptiles. 

BOOKBINDING. 

Books carefully Bound to pattern. 

This department now greatly enlarged. 

Wilts Archaeological Magazine bound to match previous volume?. 

We have several back numbers to make up sets. 

I 

C. H. WOODWARD, Printer and Publisher, 

Exchange Buildings, Station Road, Devizes. 



THE 

North Wilts Museum and 
LIBRARY AT DEVIZES. 



In answer to the appeal made in 1905, annual subscriptions 
varying from £2 to 5s., to the amount of about £30 a year for this 
purpose have been given since then by about seventy Members of 
the Society and the. fund thus set on foot has enabled the 
Committee already to add much to the efficiency of the Library 
and Museum. 

It is very desirable that this fund should be raised to at least 
£50 a year, in order that the General Fund of the Society may 
be released to a large extent from the cost of the Museum, and 
set free for the other purposes of the Society. 

Subscriptions of 5s. a year, or upwards, are asked for, and 
should be sent either to Mr. D. Owen, Bank Chambers, Devizes, 
or Bev. E. H. Goddard, Clyffe Vicarage, Swindon. 

The Committee appeal to Members of the Society and others 
to secure any 

Objects of Antiquity, 

AND 

Specimens of unusual Birds, 
Butterflies, or Moths, 

found in the County of Wilts and to forward them to the 
Hon. Curator, Mr. B. H. Cunnington, Devizes ; 

Whilst Old Deeds, Modern Pamphlets, Articles, 

Portraits; Illustrations from recent Magazines 

or Papers bearing in any way on the County, 

and Sale Particulars of Wiltshire Properties, 

will be most gratefully received for the Library by the KEY. 
E. H. Goddard, Clyffe Vicarage, Swindon, Hon. Librarian. 

0. H. WOODWARD, MACHINE PRINTER, DEVIZES. 



fc»w V»" I^W 



No. cxxix. . December, wis. vol. xl. 

THE 

WILTSHIRE 

Archaeological & Natural History 

MAGAZINE, 

Published under the Direction of the 

SOCIETY FOBMED IN THAT COUNTY, 
A. D. 18 5 3. 



EDITED BY 

REV. E. H. GODDARD, Clyffe Vicarage, Swindon. 

[The authors of the papers printed in this " Magazine'' are alone responsible for all 
statements made therein,] 




DEVIZES : 

Printed and sold for the Society by C. H. Woodward, 
Exchange Buildings, Station Road. 



Price os. 6d. Members, Gratis 



NOTICE TO MEMBEES. 
TAKE NOTICE, that a copious Index for the preceding eight 
volumes of the Magazine will be found at the end of Vols, 
viii., xvi., xxiv., and xxxii. The subsequent Volumes are 
each indexed separately. 

Members who have not paid their Subscriptions to the Society for 
the current year, are requested to remit the same forthwith to 
the Financial Secretary, Mr. David Owen, Bank Chambers, 
Devizes, to whom also all communications as to the supply 
of Magazines should be addressed. 

The Annual Subscription to the Society is 10/6, with an entrance 
fee of 10/6. The Composition for Life Membership is £10 10s. 

The Numbers of this Magazine will be delivered gratis, as issued, 
to Members who are not in arrear of their Annual Subscrip- 
tions, but in accordance with Byelaw No. 8 "The Financial 
Secretary shall give notice to Members in arrear, and the 
Society's publications will not be forwarded to Members whose 
Subscriptions shall remain unpaid after such notice." 

All other communications to be addressed to the Honorary Secre- 
tary : the Eev. E. H. Goddard, Clyffe Vicarage, Swindon, 

THE SOCIETY'S PUBLICATIONS. 

To be obtained of Mr. D. OWEN, Bank Chambers, Devizes. 

THE BRITISH AND ROMAN ANTIQUITIES OF THE NORTH 
WILTSHIRE DOWNS, by the Rev. A. C. Smith, M.A. One Volume, Atlas 
4fco, 248 pp., 17 large Maps, and 110 Woodcuts, Extra Cloth. Price £2 2s. 
One copy offered to each Member of the Society at £1 lis. 6d. 

THE FLOWERING PLANTS OF WILTSHIRE. One Volume, 8vo, 
504 pp., with Map, Cloth. By the Rev. T. A. Preston, M.A. Price to the 
Public, 16s. ; but one copy offered to every Member of the Society at half-price. 

CATALOGUE of the STOURHEAD COLLECTION of ANTIQUITIES 
in the SOCIETY'S MUSEUM, with 175 Illustrations. Part I. Price Is. 6d. 

CATALOGUE of ANTIQUITIES in the SOCIETY'S MUSEUM. 
Part II. 1911. Fully illustrated. Price 2s. 

CATALOGUE of the SOCIETY'S LIBRARY at the MUSEUM, 
Price Is. APPENDIX No. I., II., and III., 3d. each. 

CATALOGUE of DRAWINGS, PRINTS, and Maps, in the SOCIETY'S 
LIBRARY at the MUSEUM. Price Is. 6d. . 

CATALOGUE of WILTSHIRE TRADE TOKENS in the SOCIETY'S 
COLLECTION. Price 6d. 

BACK NUMBERS of the MAGAZINE. Price to the Public, 5s. 6d. and 
3s. 6d. (except in the case of a few numbers, the price of which is raised). 
Members are allowed a reduction of 25 per cent, from these prices. 



WILTSHIRE 
Archaeological & Natural History 

MAGAZINE. 



No. CXXIX. DECEMBER, 1918. Vol. XL. 



Contents. 



PAGE 



Existing Materials for Wiltshire Bibliography : By the 

Rev. E. H. Goddard 209-230, 272 

East Wiltshire Mosses, Hepatics, and Land Shells : By 

Cecil P. Hurst 231—249 

The Sixty-Fifth General Meeting at Devizes 250—252 

The Church Survey in Wilts, 1649—50: Communicated by 

the Ven. Archdeacon E. J. Bodington 253—272 

Wilts Obituary 273—279 

Wiltshire Books, Pamphlets, and Articles 280—288 

Books, Pamphlets, and Articles by Wiltshire Authors... 288—293 

Wiltshire Illustrattons 293—295 

Additions to Library 295 



Devizes :— C. H. Woodward, Exchange Buildings, Station Road. 






'■ ■"■''■■ "\ 



\~- 



THE 

WILTSHIRE MAGAZINE. 



" MULTORUM MANIBUS GRANDE LEVATUR ONUS." — Ovid. 

No. CXXIX. December, 1918. Vol. XL. 

EXISTING MATEKIALS FOR WILTSHIRE 
BIBLIOGRAPHY. 
By the Rev. E. H. Goddard. 
Afc the Wilton Meeting of the Society, in 1891, Mr. C. W. Holgate 
read a paper (Wilts Arch. Mag., xxvi., 221 — 241) entitled "A 
Proposed Bibliography of Wiltshire," in which he suggested that 
the compilation of a Bibliography of the County should at once be 
set on foot. Mr. Holgate was himself much interested in work 
of this kind, and by his careful and accurate habit of mind was 
well fitted to undertake it, and he began at once to copy out the 
title pages of such books as he came across in the Palace Library at 
Salisbury, at Messrs. Brown's, booksellers, in the Canal, and else- 
where, Unfortunately, however, his hands were so full of official 
and other diocesan work, that beyond the collection of a com- 
paratively small number of notes, nothing more came of it, and 
after his early death such notes and cuttings as he had got together 
came into my hands. Mr. G. E. Dartnell, of Salisbury, like Mr, 
Holgate an accurate and careful worker, was also interested in the 
project, and made notes of a large quantity of material, chiefly 
magazine and newspaper articles, and recent books which in the 
course of years passed through his hands. He too, however, died 
early, and his material, which had never been in any way digested 
or put in order, was also passed on to me. As to my own share in 
the work — I have for the last 27 years carefully copied the title 
pages and noted the pages, contents, size, &c, of every book, 
pamphlet, magazine, or important newspaper article on any 
Wiltshire subject, or written by any native of, or resident in 
Wiltshire, which in the course of that period has come under my 

VOL XL. — NO. OXXIX. P 



210 Existing Materials for Wiltshire Bibliography, 

notice. I have also carefully looked through some thousands, I 
suppose, of booksellers' catalogues, and have cut out from them 
every notice of such books or pamphlets. I thus found myself 
with a very large mass of bibliographical material on my hands ; 
indeed I knew of only one other source from which any large 
addition to the material already collected was likely to be made. 
The late Canon J. E. Jackson, F.S.A., had always been interested 
in the subject and had collected a large number of cuttings and 
notes dealing with it. These, with his other MS. papers and notes 
on Wiltshire, were given after his death to the Library of the 
Society of Antiquaries, where within the last few years they have 
been arranged (I believe by the Rev. C. W. Shickle, F.S.A., of 
Bath) and bound up in a number of large folio volumes. The last 
of these volumes, lettered " Wanborough, Wylye," contains the 
Bibliographical collections with some other material, and this 
volume the Council of the Society most kindly lent to me for the 
space of six months in 1917, allowing me to transcribe from it every- 
thing which I had not already got from other sources. This 
collection consists of cuttings from catalogues and rough notes 
jotted down on odd bits of paper from time to time by Canon 
Jackson, and though it contained references to a large amount of 
material new to me, and to many obscure authors otherwise 
un-noted, it was in a measure disappointing. The notes, &c, 
are now arranged in alphabetical order, but Canon Jackson 
had never in any way digested any of the material, and in the 
whole collection there were hardly a dozen titles completely and 
accurately copied out, or exhaustively dealt with. The value of 
the collection as a whole was not, therefore, so great as I had hoped 
to find it. The labour of comparing and extracting was considerable, 
but after six months' work I was able to add all new matter con- 
tained in it to my own collections, which I had previously reduced 
to order, and thus found myself possessed of practically the whole 
of the material at present available for a " Wiltshire Bibliography." 
It is not a subject which greatly appeals to me, or in which I have 
any specially expert knowledge, but as chance had thrown the 
material into my hands, if that material was not to be lost, and 



By the Rev. E. H. Goddard. 211 

fche work of several hands and many years thrown away, the only 
thing to he done was to sort, digest, and as far as possible complete 
and put into permanent order this large mass of material. I have, 
accordingly, arranged the whole of it on sheets of foolscap size, 
under the names of authors, and also under Wiltshire place names. 
It is, therefore, now easy to refer to, and will, I hope, form the 
basis upon which the future bibliographer of Wiltshire will be able 
to complete his work. As it stands it is by no means ready for 
printing or publication ; it still needs several years' work by someone 
within reach of the Bodleian or British Museum Library to bring 
it to anything like a complete or final condition. I should be most 
happy to hand it over to anyone who may feel disposed to under- 
take its completion. It will be placed eventually in the Society's 
Library, but meanwhile I propose to keep it in my own hands and 
to add to it as occasion offers. It seems desirable now, however, to 
put the fact of its existence and the possibility of consulting it on 
record here. 

The following books of reference, amongst others, have been gone 
through and the Wiltshire references extracted : — Wiltshire Archae- 
ological Magazine, vols. I.— XL. Wiltshire Notes and Queries, vols- 
I. — VIII. Wiltshire Parish Registers, Marriages, vols. I. — X. 
Memorials of Old Wiltshire. Memoirs Illustrative of the Hist, and 
Antiqs. of Wiltshire and the City of Salisbury, 1851. Britton's 
Beauties of Wiltshire, 3 vols. Salisbury Field Club Transactions, 
2 vols. Marlb. Coll. Nat. Hist. Reports, to 1918. Stratford's 
Wiltshire Worthies. Cassan's Lives of the Bishops of Salisbury- 
Index to Archaeological Papers, 1665 — 1890. Collectanea Topog. <fe 
Genealog., vols. I. — VIII. Gentleman's Magazine Library — Archae- 
ology ; Topography ; Romano- British Remains. Lowndes' Biblio- 
graphers' Manual, 6 vols. Upcott's Topography. Wood's Athenaz 
Oxonienses, Ed. Bliss, 4 vols. Cooper's Athena? Cantabrigienses y 
1500 — 1609, 2 vols. 

I have reckoned as " Wiltshire Authors" all who were born, or 
have held office, or resided for any length of time in the county, so 
par as I have been able to discover them. The total number of 
such authors is about 1700, whilst the number of separate titles 
I P 2 



212 Existing Materials for Wiltshire Bibliography. 

including different editions of the same work, is somewhere about 
14,900. In this total are included all the more important notices 
of Wiltshiremen and Wiltshire articles in newspapers and maga- 
zines, Sale Particulars of Wiltshire properties, the more important 
Catalogues of Sales of household furniture and books, Acts of 
Parliament, and such Eeports of Societies and Institutions in 
Wiltshire as are published in pamphlet form. Where these are 
published annually the series is reckoned as one entry only. The 
majority of the 947 titles by 732 authors already dealt with by 
Mr. W. Jerome Harrison in his " Bibliography of Stonehenge and 
Avebury," ( Wilts Arch. Mag., xxxii.) are not included in my lists. 

It is not possible to give more than an approximate total of the 
whole, as the cuttings from booksellers' catalogues, of which there 
are a large number, and entries extracted from Lowndes, Wood, 
and other authorities, often no doubt refer to the same work or 
edition. None indeed of the entries derived from these sources 
can be considered as finally dealt with until the attempt has been 
made to correct them by the inspection of the works themselves 
in some great library. As I have said above it is not possible 
for me personally to do anything in this direction, but I have 
distinguished all entries which I have been able to complete 
myself thus [Title. E.H.G.], and in cases where the book is 
in the Museum Library at Devizes [Title. E.H.G. Dev, Mus.]. 
Where the entry has been completed by someone else I have 
added [Title. C. W. Holgate], &c. In the large number of cases, 
also, where the entry has been taken from the "[Index of Archae- 
ological Papers] " it may be considered to be complete. Of such 
completed entries there are about 7750, or rather more than half of 
the total number. Though a formidable amount of work still remains 
for the bibliographer of the future, I am glad to have been able so 
far to preserve and render available for reference the large mass 
of material which had come into my hands. 

I am printing the list of authors' names at present known to me 
below. I should be very grateful to anyone who can give me 
further names of Wiltshire writers and particulars of their writ- 
ings. 



By the Rev. E. H. Goddard. 



213 



List of Wiltshire Authors. 
[? denotes in some cases that the author, though not a Wiltshireman, has 
written on Wiltshire subjects ; in others that his claim to be included is 
doubtful.] 



A. B. C. 

Abbott, Edwin A. 
Abbott, Robt. (Bp. of Salisbury) 
A' Court, Sir Will., G.C.B. 
Acworth, George (Wroughton) 
Adams, Rev. J. 1869 [bury) 

Adams, Rev. John. 1804. (Salis- 
Adams, Rice (R. of Donhead) 
Adams, Peter (Steeple Ashton) 
Adams, W. Maurice (Grafton) 
Addison, Joseph (Milston) 
Addison, Lancelot (Milston) 
Adee, Nich. (V. of Rodbourne 

Cheney) 
Adkin, J. H. Knight (Crudwell) 
Adkins, Thos. 

" Agrickler." See Edwards, Joseph 
Aiken, John, M.D. 
Ainger, Thos. 
Akerman, J. Y. 
"Albert" (Winkfield) 
Aldhelm, St. (Malmesbury) 
Aldis, John 
Aldridge, Will. 
Alexander, R. C, M.D. 
Alison, Archibald (Preb. Sarum) 
1 Alison, Sir Archibald 
Allan, Rev. Will. 
Alleine, Joseph (Devizes) 
?Alleine, Richard 
Allix, Peter, D.D. (Treas. Sarum) 
Allnuth, Rich. (V. of Damerham) 
Allport, Josiah [sett) 

Andrews, John (Berwick Bas- 
Andrews, W. R. 

Anketell,H.K. (V.Woott. Bassett) 
Annesley, Sam., L.L.D. 
Anstie, Fras. Edmund 
Anstie, Harriet T. (Devizes) 
Anstie, J. 
Anstie, James 
Anstie, Peter (Winkfield) 
Anstey, Chr. ( Uardenhuish) 
Antrobus, Lady (Amesbury) 
Archer, Hannah (Kingsdown, 

Stratton St. Marg.) 
Armfield, H. T. (Salisbury) 
Armour, Geo. Denholm (Ktchil- 

hampton ; Purton) [Down) 

Arnold-Foster, Mary (Bassett 
Arundell, Thos., Earl of 
Arundell of Wardour, 1 2th Baron 
Arundell of Wardour, Hen., Lord 

1660 



Ashe, Emily (Langley Burrell) 
Ashe, Robt. M. (Langley Burrell) 
Ashe, Simeon 
Ashe, T. (Heytesbury) 
Ashley, Robert 

" Ashton S." See Bosanquet, E. F. 
Aske, Nath. (R. Gt. Somerford) 
Astley, F. Dukinfield 
Astley, H. J. Dukinfield 
Astley, Sir John (Everley) 
Atherton, Charles (Calne) 
Atkins, S. R. (Salisbury) 
Atkinson, George (Salisbury) 
Atley, H. [chael) 

Aubrey, John (Kington St. Mi- 
Audeley, Lady Eleanor 
Audley, Mervyn, Lord, Earl of 

Castlehaven [Drew.) 

Austin, Anthony (R. Littleton 
Avebury, Lord (Sir J. Lubbock) 
Avesbury, Robert of [Michael) 
Awdry, Ed. C. (V. of Kington St. 
Awdry, Frances (d. of Sir John) 
Awdry, Sir John (Notton) 
Awdry, Mrs. (w. of Bp. William) 
Awdry, Will., (Bp. of S. Tokio) 
Awdry, Will. (R. of Ludgershall) 
Axford, John (Lacock) 
Ayliffe, John, L.L.D. 
Ayliffe, John (Tockenham) 
" Ayscough, John " (Mons.*Bicker- 

staffeDrew, WinterbourneGun- 

ner) 
B. 

B., J. C. 

Baber, Harry (V. of Ramsbury) 
Babington, A. (Marlborough) 
Baggs, John [borough) 

Bailey, Francis (R. of Wood- 
Bailey, Rev. Geo. (Calne ; Lyd- 

iard Tregoze) [bury) 

Bailey, Rev. George (Malmes- 
Baker, Amy J. (Calne) 
Baker. Frances E. (Salisbury) 
Baker, Stanley (Salishury) 
Baker, Thos. Hen. (Mere Down ; 

(Salisbury) 
Baldwin, Peter (Malmesbury) 
Balguy, John (Preb. of Sarum) 
Banks, Benj., (Salisbury) 
Banks, Mrs. Linnaeus 
Banning, F. (Pewsey) 
? Barclay, Edgar 
Barclay, James 



214 



Existing Materials for Wiltshire Bibliography. 



Barker, Thomas 

Barlowe, Will.( Archdeaconof Sar.) 

Barne, Hen. (Seend) 

Barnes, W. L. (R. of Barford St. 

Martin) 
Barnes, Rev. Will. 
Barnes, Will. (R. of Brixton Dev- 

erill) 
Barnwell, Rev. E. L. (Melksham) 
Baron, Rev. John (R. of Upton 

Scudamore) 
Barrey, H. G. (Devizes) 
Barington,Shute( Bp.of Salisbury) 
Barrow, Edwin P. (Cholderton) 
Barrow, G. Neale (West Kington) 
Barrow, Isaac 

Barry, Rev. H. (Draycot Cerne) 
Bateman, Josiah (V. of St. Mary's, 

Marlborough) 
Bath, Isabella Byng, 2nd March- 
ioness (Longleat) 
Bath, John Alex., 4th Marquis 

(Longleat) 
Bathurst, Charles (M.P. S. Wilts) 
Batson, Mrs. Stephen [H. M.] 

(Ramsbury) 
Batt, John Thos. 
Bax, Clifford (Broughton Gifford) 
Bayley, Mrs. (Market Lavington) 
Baylie, Thos. (R. of Mildenhall) 
Bayly, Eliz. B. 
Bayly, Will (Bp's. Cannings) 
Beach Will. (R. of Orcheston) 
Beach, Will. (Steeple Ashton) 
Beasant, Thos. (Lydiard Tregoze) 
£ Beaufort, Duke of 
Beaven, Thomas, Jun. 
? Beckford, Peter 
Beckford, William, Alderman 

(Fonthill) 
Beckford, Will. (Fonthill) 
? Beckford, Will, (of Suffolk) 
Beddoe, John (Bradford) 
Beddoe, Mrs. (Bradford) 
Beesley, A. H. (Marlborough) 
Bekinsau, John (Broad Chalke) 
Bell, Clive (Seend) 
Bell, G. C. (Master of Marlb. Col.) 
Bell, W. Heward (Seend) 
Benett,Etheldred(Norton Bavant) 
Benett, John, Sen. (Pythouse) 
Bennett, Thomas (Can. Sarum) 
Benett Stanford, John (Pythouse) 
Benet- Stanford, Mrs. (Pythouse) 
Benger, Eliz. O. (Devizes) 
Benham, W. G. 
Bennett, Fred. (V. of Shrewton) 



?Bennett, F. E. 

?Bennett, F. J. 

Bennett, Thomas D.D. (St. Ed- 
mund's, Salisbury) 

Bennett, W. C. (V. of Corsham) 

Bennion, John (V.of Malmesbury) 

Benson. Robert (Recorder, Salisb.) 

Benson, Will. (Sheriff) 

Berens, Edward (Preb. of Sarum) 

Bernard, E. R. (Canon of Sarum) 

Biddulph, Mrs. Sidney 

Biggar, Will. 

Biggs, Rev. Huyshe W. Yeatman, 
Bp. of Worcester (Stockton) 

Biggs, James (Devizes) 

Billingsley, Nich. 

Billings] ey, Sam. (Marlborough ?) 

Bingham, Peregrine (R. of Ber- 
wick St. John) 

Bingham, Will. P. S. (V. of Ber- 
wick Bassett and West bury) 

Birch, Sam. 

Birch, Walter (V. of Stanton St. 
Bernard) 

?Birch, W. de Gray 

Bird, James T. (Malmesbury) 

Bird, W. R. (Swindon) 

Birkbeck, Morris (Wanborough) 

Bishop, John 

Bispham, T. 

Bissot, George 

Blackmore, H. P. (Salisbury) 

Blackmore, Sir Rich. (Corsham) 

Blackmore, Will. (Salisbury) 

Blackwell, Thos. Evans (Devizes) 

Blake, Hen. (Trowbridge) 

Bland, Gervas (V. of Chitterne All 
Saints) 

Blayney, Ben. (R. of Poulshot) 

Bleek, A. G. (V. of Preshute) 

Bliss, James (V. of Ogbourne St. 
And. ; R. of Manningford Bruce) 

Blomfield, Arthur (C. of Lacock) 
?Blomneld, Sir A. 

Blundell/ttios (C.of All Cannings) 

Bodington, E. J. ( Vicar of Potterne 
and Calne, Archdeacon of Wilts) 

Bodman, James 

Bogue, W. A. (Salisbury) 

Bolingbroke, Hen. St. John, Vis- 
count (Lydiard Tregoze) 

Bond, John 

Bosanquet, E. F. (Steeple Ashton) 
?Botfield, Beriah 

Bothams, Walt. (Salisbury?) 

Boucher, R. 

Bouchier,Barton(R.ofFonthillBp.) 



By the Bev. E. IT. Goddard, 



215 



Boughton, Thomas (Hungerford) 
Bourne, A. (Heytesbury) 
Bourne, Clement (Grittleton) 
Bourne, Mary Ann (Heytesbury) 
Bouverie, Hon. Rev. B. P. (K. of 

Pewsey) 
Bouverie, E. 0. P. (M. Lavington) 
Bouverie, Hon. P. Pleydell, M.P. 

?Bowden, John 
Bowden, S. 

Bowdler, Henrietta M. (Ashley) 
Bowdler, Jane (Ashley) 
Bowdler, John, Sen. (Ashley) 
Bowdler, John, Jun. (Ashley) 
Bowdler, Mrs.(w.of Thos., Ashley) 
Bowdler, Thos. Jun. (Ashley) 
Bowen, W, (Nettleton) 
Bower, Edmund 
Bowes, J. Ireland (Devizes) 
Bowie, John (Idmiston) 
Bowles, Caroline 
Bowles, Charles 

% Bowles, Emily 

Bowles, John (Dean of Salisbury) 
Bowles, Mrs. (Bremhill) 
Bowles, Will. Lisle (V.of Bremhill) 
Boyle, G. D. (Dean of Salisbury) 
Boyle, Mary Louisa 

?Boyne, Will. 

?Brabant, % H. 
Bradford, J. E. G, (Swindon) 
Bradley, A. G. (Marlborough) 
Bradley, G. G. (Marlborough Coll.) 
Brakspear, Harold (Corsham) 
Brander,Boulton(V.of Derry Hill) 
Brentnall, H. C. (Marlborough) 
Brett, Arthur(V.of M. Lavington) 
Bridges, C. J. (Rector of Sutton 

Mandeville) 
Bridges, J. 

Bridges, John (Dean of Salisbury) 
"Briss, Vida" 
Britton,John(KingtonSt.Michael) 

1 Brock, E. P. Loftus 
Brodie, Sir Benj. (Winterslow) 
Brodie, Rev. P. B. 
Brodribb, Will. J. (R. of Wootton 

Rivers) 
Brodrick, Alan (R. of Broughton 

Gifford) 
Brooke, Charles 
Brooke, Hen. (Heddington) 
Brooke, J. W. (Marlborough) 
Broome, C. E. (Clyffe Pypard?) 
Broughton, Lord (Broughton Gif- 
ford [John Cam Hobhouse] 
Broughton, Thos. (Preb. of Sarum) 



Brown & Co. (Salisbury) 
Brown, G. J. Cowley (R. of St. 

Edmund's, Salisbury) 
Brown, Stafford (V. of Westbury) 
Brown, Mrs. Stafford (Westbury) 
Brown, Will. (Salisbury) 
Browne, Hen. (Amesbury) 
1 Browne, Rt. Rev. G. P. (Bp. of 

Bristol) 
Bruce, Rt. Hon. Charles,Viscount 
Buchanan, SidneyJ. (V.of Berwick 

Bassett) 
Buchanan, Thos. B. (Hector of 

Poulshot, Archdeacon of Wilts) 
Buckeridge, John (Draycot, near 

Pewsey) 
Buckland, Anna Jane 
Buckland, Edward 
?Buckman, James (Cirencester) 
Budd, Capt. H. H. (Winterbourne 

Bassett) 
Budden, John 

Bull, Theodore F. (Salisbury) 
?Bullen, Josephine 
Bunce, John S. 
Bunn, Hen. (Calne) 
Bunston,Anna(Allington, S.Wilts) 
Burder, A. W. N. (Bradford) 
Burdett, Sir Francis (Ramsbury) 
Burgess, Dan. (Marlborough ?) 
Burgess, Thos. (Bp. of Salisbury) 
Burgess, Thos. (b. at Everley, 1716) 
Burnet, Gilbert (Bp. of Salisbury) 
Burnet, Lady Margaret (w.of Bp.) 
Burnet, Mrs. or Miss (? d. of Bp ) 
Burnet, Thos. (s. of Bp.) 
Burnet, Thos., D.D. (R. of W. 

Kington) 
Burroughs, T. 
Burrows, Helen (Devizes) 
Bush, Paul (Rector of Edington & 

Bp. of Bristol) 
Bushnan, J. S. (Laverstock) 
Bushnell, Walt. (V. of Box) 
Butcher, W. H. (Devizes?) 
Butler, H. Montagu 
Butt, G. (Salisbury) 
Byfield,Adoniram(R ofColl.Ducis) 
?Byfield, Nich. 
Byrom, John (R. of Stanton St. 

Quintin) 
Cabell, Will. (N. Bradley) 
Caillard, Emma Marie (Winkfield) 
Caillard, Sir Vincent (Winkfield) 
Canaway, Sergt. (Salisbury) 
Cardigan, Earl ( M arq. of Ailesbury) 
Carey, F. W. (Netherhampton ?) 



216 



Existing Materials for Wiltshire Bibliography. 



Carrington, F. A. (Ogbourne St. 

George) 
Carpenter, Harry W. (Archdeacon 

of Sarum) 
Carpenter, Hen. (Steeple Ashton) 
Carpenter, J. W. (Calne) 
Carter, C. C. (Marlborough) 
Carter, George (Milton Lilborne) 
Carter, G. S. 

Carter, Letitia (Salisbury) 
Carter, Owen B. 
Caryl, H. A. (C. of St. Thomas, 

Salisbury) 
Cassan, Stephen H. 
Castlehaven, James, Ld. Audley, 

Earl of [vyn] 

[Castlehaven, see also Audley, Mer- 
Caswall, Ed. (V. of Stratford-sub- 

Castle) 
Caswall, Hen. (V. of Figheldean) 
Caulfield, E. (R. of Beechingstoke) 
?Caus, Isaac de 
Cennick John (Tytherton) 
Chadlicott, Thos. (Bp's. Cannings) 
Chaffey, B. (Salisbury) 
Chafin, W. 

Chafy, John (V. of Broad Chalke) 
Chalke. Rich. (Wilton) 
Chambers, Humphrey (Pewsey) 
Chambers, J. D. (Recorder of Salis.) 
Champneys, A. C. (Marlborough) 
Chandler, Julia 
Chandler, Mary (Malmesbury) 
Chandler, Rich. (Aldbourne and 

Rowde) 
Chandler, Sam (Malmesbury) 
?Chandler, Thos. 
Chandler, Will. (I.) 
Chandler, Will. (II.) (Aldbourne) 
Chappell, John (Calne) 
Chappell, W. H. (Marlborough) 
?Charleton, Walter 
Charters, S. ( Wilton) 
Chatfield, R. M. (V. of Woodford) 
Child, Miss F. (Salisbury) 
Childrey, Joshua (Archdeacon of 

Sarum) 
Chillingworth, Will.(Chancellor of 

Sarum) 
Chitty, Walter (Pewsey) 
Chret'ien,Ch P. (R. of Cholderton) 
Chubb, Thos. (Salisbury) 
Churchyard, Thos. 
Clapperton, K. (Salisbury) 
Clapperton,Walter(Salisbury)[ton 
Clarendon,Ed. Hyde, Earl of(Din- 
Clarendon, Hen. Earl of 



?Clark, Geo. Thos. 

?Clark, John (1676) 
Clark, John (Crockerton) 
Clark, Margaret(Compton Bassett) 

?Clark-Maxwell, W. G. 
Clarke, Adam, LL.D. 
Clarke, A. H. T. (R. of Devizes) 
Clarke, C. W. (Devizes) 

?Clarke, E. D., D.D. 
Clarke, John (Dean of Sarum) 
Clarke, Liscombe (V. of Downton, 

Archdeacon of Sarum) 
Clarke, Stephen(Wootton Bassett) 
Clarke, W. H. M. (V of Stratford- 

sub-Castle, and Westbury) 
Clarke, Will. (M.D.. of Bradford) 
Cleather, G. E. (V. of Chirton) 
Cleather, G. P. (C. of Chirton) 
Clutterbuck, Edmund H.(Harden- 
huish) 

?Clutterbuck, R. H. 
Coates, Will. M. (Salisbury) 

?Cobbett, Martin 

?Cobbett, Will. 

?Oobbold, T. S. 
Cockshott, W. E. (V. of Wootton 

Bassett) 
Codd, Alfred (R. of Stockton) 

^Oodrington, O. 
Codrington, R. H. (D.D., Wrough- 

ton) 
Codrington,Thos (F.G.S. Wrough- 

ton) 
Colborne. Robt. (Chippenham) 
Colborne, Thos. (Chippenham and 

Poulshot) 
Cole, Thos. (Dean of Sarum) [set) 
Coleman, Abraham ( Wootton Bas- 
Coleraine,Hen. Hare, Lord, (Long- 

leat) 
Collard, Robt. (Chilton Foliot) 
Collier, Arthur ( Steeple Langford) 
Collier, B. F. 

?Collier, C. (V. of Andover) 
Collier, Jane (Steeple Langford) 
Collins, W. G. (Bradford) 
Collinson, John (Bromham) 
Colston, Marianne (Round way) 
Colston, Mrs. (Roundway) 
Colton, C. (Salisbury) 
Combes, John (Devizes) 
Cook, Alfred 
Cooke, G. A. 
Cooke, G. W. 
Cooke, Sam (Overton) 
Cooke, Will. (V. of Enford) 
Cook, Will. (II.) 



By the Rev. E. H. Goddard, 



217 



Coombs, J. A. (Chippenham) 

Cooper, M. (C. of Bramshaw) 

Corderoy, Jeremy 

Corfe, A. T. (Salisbury) 

" Cornwall, Barry," see Proctor, B. 

Cornwall, P. M. 

?Coryat, Tom (Salisbury) 
Coryatt, Geo. (Salisbury) 
Cotton, C. E. L. (Bp. of Calcutta, 

Marlborough) 
Coulthard, Clara 
Coulton, J. T. (Devizes) 
Couper, R. M. 
Coward, R. (Roundway) 
Cowley, Will. (C. of Rushall) 
Cowley-Brown, G. 
Cox, J. B. (Salisbury) 

?Cox, R. Hippisley 

?Cox, Rev. Thos. [Bemerton) 

Coxe, Will. (Archdeacon, R. of 
Crabb, James (Wilton) 
Crabbe, George (Trowbridge) 
Crawford, W. (Wilton) 

?Creed, Gary 

Creede, Will. (R. of Codford St. 
Mary,and Stockton, Archd'con) 
Creswell, Thos. E. (Pinckney) 
Crispe, Tobias (Brinkworth) 
Croad, Mrs. (Swindon) 
Croke, John (M.P. Chippenham) 
Crowe, Will. (R. of Alton Barnes) 
Cunningham, T.S. (V. of Marden) 
Cunnington, B. H. (Devizes.) 
Cunnington, Edward 

' Cunnington, Hen. (Devizes) 
Cunnington, Mrs. M. E. (Devizes) 
Cunnington, Will., F.G.S. (Hey- 
tesbury ; Devizes) 

\ Cunnington, Will., F.S.A. 

iCunnington, W. A. 
Currie, James (Upper Upham) 

ICurry, Richard (Insp. of Schools). 
Dalby, Will. (V. of Warminster ; 

R. of Compton Bassett) 
Dalliba, Gerda (Harnham) 
Dark, Mariann (Calne 1) 
Darling, Sam (Beckhampton) 
Dartnell, Geo. E. (Salisbury) 
Dartnell, Hen. W. (Salisbury) 
Darnell, J. J. (R. Langley Burrell) 
Daniell, W. (Warminster) 
Dansey, Will. (R. of Donhead) 
(Daubeny, Charles (V. of N. Brad- 
; ley ; Archdeacon of Sarum) 
Davenant, John (Bp. of Salisbury) 
, Davenport, Geo. (C. of Calne) 
, Davies, Eleanor, Lady (Fonthill) 

70L XL. — NO. CXXIX. 



?Davies, J. Silvester 
Davies, Sir John (Tisbury) 
Davies, Maud F. (Corsley) 
Davis C. (Preshute) 
Davis, C.A.C. (Devizes) 

?Davis, C. E. 

?Davis C. H. (R. of LittletonDrew) 
Davis, Ellen Louisa (Littleton 

Drew) 
Davis, James (M.D., Devizes) 
Davis, John (Ameshury) 
Davis, John (Salisbury) 
Davis, Thomas (Longleat) 
Davisson, John (Trowbridge) 
" Davus " 

Dawes, J. W. (Trowbridge) 
Dawson, Robert 

?Day, Will. A. [bury) 

De la Pasture, Mrs. Hen.(Malmes- 
De Quetteville, W. (R. of Brink- 
worth) 
De St. Croix, H. C. (Figheldean) 
Deane, Hen. (Preb. of Sarum) 
Delany, Mrs. (Coulston) 
Demainbray, S. (Gt. Somerford) 
Denison, Edward (Bp.of Salisbury) 
Denison, W. T. (Capt.) 

?Dennis, J. 

Desprez,Rev.Phil. S.(Alvediston) 
Devizes, Richard of 

?Dewell, T. (M.D.) 
Dickins, F. V. (Seend) 
Dickinson, Ch. ( Farley Hill, then 
in Wilts, now in Berks) [tham) 
Dickson-Poynder, Sir John (Har- 
Dimont, C. T. (Salisbury) 

?Dingley, Thos. 

?Diplock, A. H. 
Ditton, Humphrey (Salisbury) 
Dixon, S. B. (Pewsey) 
Dodson, Michael (Marlborough) 
Dodsworth, Will. (Salisbury) 
Dodwell, Will. (Canon of Sarum) 
Doel, James (Maiden Bradley) 
Doel, Will. (Westwood; South- 
wick) 
Dolman, James (Roundway) 
Dorling, E. E. (Salisbury ; R. of 
Burcombe) 

?Douce, Francis [bury) 

Douglas, Archibald, Lord (Ames- 

^Douglas, Rev. James 
Douglas, John (Bp. of Salisbury) 
Douglas, Will. (V. of Potterne) 
Dowding,MissM.K. (Chippenham) 
Dowding, T. W. (Preshute) 
Dowding, Will. (Fisherton Anger) 



218 



Existing Materials for Wiltshire Bibliography. 



Downes, Catherine 
Drake, J. (R. of Stockton) 
?Drant, Thos. (Shaftesbury) 
Drayton, Thos., D.D. 
Dredge, James (Fisherton Anger) 
Drummond, Rob. Hay (Bp. of 

Salisbury) 
Drury, Hen. (Archdeacon of Wilts ; 

V. of Bremhill) 
?Drury, H. D. (Marlborough 1) 
Du Boulay, John (Donhead) 
Duck, Stephen (Charlton, near 

Pewsey) 
Duckett, Geo. (Hartham) 
Duckett, Sir Geo. F., Bart. 
Duke, Edward (Lake) 
Duke, H. H. (R. of Brixton 

Deverill ; V. of Westbury) 
Duke, R. E. H. 
Duncan, John (V. of Lyneham ; 

and Calne) 
Dunsdon, Charles (Semington) 
Duppa, Brian (Bp. of Salisbury) 
?Dupre, Dr. J. 
Durham, Admiral Sir Phil. (M.P. 

Devizes) 
Dyer, A S. 
Dyer, Robt. (Devizes) 
Dyke, John 

Eales, S. J. (Warminster) 
?Eardley-Wilmot, Sir John 
Earle, C. S. (R. of Little Langford) 
Earle, John (Bp. of Salisbury) 
Earle, Mrs. S. K. L. (Compton 

Chamberlayne; LittleLangford) 
Earle, Will. Benson (Salisbury) 
Easton, James (Salisbury) 
Eddrupp, Ed. P. (V. of Bremhill) 
Edmeads, Will. (Wroughton) 
Edmund (Rich.) Saint (Preb. of 

Calne) 
Edwards, Brian (Westbury) 
Edwards, James 
Edwards, J. (Amesbury) 
Edwards, Joseph " Agrickler" (De- 
vizes) 
Edwards, M. 
Eedes, John (Salisbury) 
Eland, Hen. S. [ford) 

Ellice, Lady Jane Henrietta(Long- 
Elliot, Edward (V. of Norton 

Bavant) 
Elliot, Richd. (Devizes) 
^Elliot, Thos. (Cirencester) 
Elling, Anne 

Ellis, John Hen. (R. of Stourton) 
?Elyard S. J. 



Elyot, Sir Thomas 

"Emeritus" see Prower, Major J. E 

Emmerson, Mrs. Eliza L. 

Emra, Rev. J. (Redlynch; V. of 

Biddestone) 
Empson, Charles W. (Wellow) 
Engleheart, G. H. (V. of Chute 

Forest ; Dinton) 
Ensor, Geo. (V. of Heywood) 
Estcourt, T. 

Estcourt, T. H. Sotheron 
Estridge, A. W. 
Estridge, H. W. (Minety) 
Evans, J. Harrington (Salisbury) 
Evans, Thos. (V. of Froxfield) 
Eve, A. S. (Marlborough) 
Everingham, W. (Salisbury) 
Evetts, Dr. (Chippenham) 
Ewart,Misses(Broadleas, Devizes) 
Ewart, W. (V. of Bp's. Cannings) 
Ewart, Will. (M.P., Broadleas) 
?Eyles, Francis 
Eyre, Hen. 

Eyre, Rich. (Canon of Sarum) 
Eyre, Rev. Robert (Box) 
Eyre, Will. (Salisbury) 
Fancourt, Sam. (Salisbury) 
Fane, Arthur (V. of Warminster) 
Farquharson, A. N. (N. Bradley) 
Farr, Charles 
Farr, C. J. P. 
Farrar, Fred. W. (Marlborough) 
?Fawcett, Ed. D. 
Fawcett, Hen, (M.P. Salisbury) 
Fawcett, J. E. 

Fawcett, Mrs. M. G. (Salisbury) 
Feild, Edward (Insp. of Schools) 
Fellowes, C. (Salisbury) 
Feltham, John (Salisbury) 
?Fenton, Richd. 
Fergus, Dr. (Marborough) 
Kerraby, Geo. (V.of Bp's. Cannings) 
?Ferrey, Benj. 
Ferris, Sam. (M.D.) 
Fidler, Gideon 
?Fidler, T. C. 
Filkes, John (Devizes) 
Filleul, P. W. G. (R. of Devizes) 
?Finlason, W. F. 
Fisher, A. H. 
Fisher, Col. 

Fisher, Emmeline (Poulshot) 
Fisher, Francis (V. of Hilmarton) 
Fisher, John ( Bp. of Salisbury) 
?Fisher, Rev. O. 
Fitzmaurice, Lord (Bradford) 
Flower, Job (Melksham) 






By the Rev. E. H. Goddard. 



219 



Flower, Thos. Bruges 
Floyer, J. K. 
Flynn, John Stephen 
Foot, Jesse (Donhead) 
Forder, Elsie M. (Salisbury) 
Forman, Simon (Wilton) 
Foster, Sir Michael (Marlborough) 
Fotherby,Martin(Bp.of Salisbury) 
Fowle, Edmund (R. of Allington ; 

V. of Amesbury) 
Fowle, F. W. (R. of Allington ; V. 

of Amesbury) 
Fowle, T, Lloyd 
Fowler, Christopher (Marlboro') 
Fowler, Richard (M.D., Salisbury) 
Fowler, Sir Robert N. (Gastard) 
Fowler, Thomas (Melksham) 
Fox, Bohun (V. of Melksham) 
Fox, Eliz. (Warminster ?) 
Fox, Francis (R. of Boscombe ; V. 

of Potterne) 
Fox, Sir Stephen (Farley) [hill) 
Frampton, Matthew (V. of Brem- 
Framnton, Thomas 
Francis, Charles (R.of Mildenhall) 
Franklin, John 
Fraser, James (R. of Cholderton ; 

Bp. of Manchester) 
Fraunce, Abraham 
Frearson, J. 

Freake, Edmund (Dean of Sarum) 
Freake, Will. (Hannington) 
?Fry, E. A. 

Fry, John (Sutton Benger) 
Fulf ord, Francis(R .of Trowbridge) 
Fulford, George (Salisbury) 
Fuller, J. G. [ton) 

Fuller, Sir John, M.F. (M.P., Nes- 
Fuller, Nich. (R. of Allington) 
Fuller, Thomas (Preb of Sarum) 
Fuller, T. E. (Melksham) 
Furness,Annette(BerwickSt.Jas.) 
Fyler, Samuel (R. of Stockton) 
G.J. 

Gale, Hen. 
i Gale, Hen. (Garsdon) 
Gale, J. H. ( V.of Milton Lilborne) 
; Galpin, A. J. (Marlborough) 
Garbrand, John (Preb. Sarum) 
Gardiner,Thos.(Tytherton Lucas) 
Gardiner, Will. (V. of St. Mary's, 

Marlborough ; Southbroom) 

Garrett, Walter (R. of Everley) 

i Gauntlett, Hen. (C. of Tilshead) 

: Geddes, Mich. (Chanc. of Sarum) 

?Geikie, J C. 

Gellard, George 



Gellender, E. E. (Salisbury) 
George, Will. 

Geste, Edmund (Bp.of Salisbury) 
Gibbons, Albert (Oaksey) 
Gibney, Robert D. 
Gidley, L. (Salisbury) 
Gilbert, John (Salisbury) 
^Gilbert, W. 
Gilbert, Will. 

Gill, T. H. (R. of Trowbridge) [ley) 
Gillanders, Alex. T.(Maiden Brad- 
Gillman, Charles (Devizes) 
Gillman, R. D. (Devizes) 
Gilpin, Will. (Preb. of Sarum) 
Girdlestone,Hen. (R. of Landford) 
Gladstone, Capt. John N. (M.P. 

for Devizes) 
Glanville, John (Broad Hinton) 
Glanville, Sir John, Jun. (Broad 

Hinton) 
Glare, Jonathan 
Glenconner, Lady [Pamela Ten- 

nant] (Wilsford) 
Glover, Hen. (Mere) 
Goddard, Ambrose L. (Swindon) 
Goddard, C. V.(Shrewton ; Baver- 

stock) 
Goddard, E. H. (Clyffe Pypard) 
Goddard, Thos. (R. of N. Wraxall) 
?Godsall, Major P. T. 
^Godwin, E. W. 
Gold, R. 
Goldney, Adam 
Goldney, Fred. H. (Corsham) 
Goldsbrough, Albert 
Gooch,Sir Daniel ( YT.P.,Cricklade) 
Good, J. E. (Salisbury) 
Goodman, Mrs. 
Gordon, Douglas (Salisbury) 
?Gordon, Mrs. Eliz. 
Gordon, John (Dean of Sarum) 
Gore, J. (Shalboi rne) 
Gore, Thomas (Alderton) 
Gorst, Harold E. (Castle Combe) 
Gorst, Sir John Eldon (Castle 

Combe) 
?Gotch, J. A. 
?Gough, Rich.. F.S.A. 
Gough, Will. (Erkstoke) 
Gould, Robt. 
Gould, Will. (Alvediston) 
Gourlay, Robert, of Wylye) 
?Gowen, R. 
Graham, Capt. Hen. 
?Graham, P. Andeison 
Graile, John (I.), (R. of Tedworth) 
Graile, John (II.), (Salisbury) 

R 2 



220 



Existing Materials for Wiltshire Bibliography, 



Grant, Ignatius 

Gratrex, Capt. T. P. (Corsham ?) 
Gray, Thos. S. (R. of Garsdon) 
Greene, Thomas, D.D. (Dean of 

Sarum) [bury ?) 

Greenhill, Thos. (surgeon, Salis- 
Greenhill, Will. (Salisbury) 
Greensted, Frances 
?Greenwell, William,F.S.A., F.R.S. 
Gregory, Edmund (Chirton) 
Gregory, John (Preb. of Sarum) 
Griffin, Anne 

Grindle, H. A. L. (Devizes) 
Griffith, C. Darby (M.P., Devizes) 
Griffith, Mrs.G.Darby(Roundway) 
Griffith, Joshua 
Grose, Francis 
Grose, S. (M.D.) 
Grove, C. H. (R. of Sedgehill) 
Grove, Lady (Sedgehill) 
Grover, H. M. 
?Guest, Edwin 
Gundry, Maria (Calne) 
Gundry, R. S. (Devizes) 
Gunn, H. M. (Warminster) 
Guthrie, J. (? V. of Calne) 
Guy, Hen. (Chippenham) 
Gwillim, E. LI. (Marlborough) 
Gwyer, Joseph (Redlynch) 
Hadow, G. R. (R. of Calstone and 

Wylye) 
mall, H. Byng 
mall, Hubert 

Hall, Marshall (Blacklands) 
Hall, Peter (R. of Milston) 
mall, S. C. 

Hallam, Robert (Bp. of Salisbury) 
Halpin, W. H. (Salisbury) 
Hamilton, W. K. (Bp. of Sarum) 
Hammond, J. J. (Salisbury) 
mamper, Will. 
Hannes, Edward (Devizes) 
Hanson, J.- (N. Bradley) 
?Hanway, Jonas 
Harbin, Charles (Hindon) 
Harcourt, James 
Harding (— ) (Wanborough) 
Harding, Emily G. (Salisbury) 
Harding, J. (V. of Martin) 
Harding, John (Salisbury) 
Hardyng, Thomas (Treasurer of 
?Hardy, W. J. [Sarum Cath.) 

Hare,AugustusJ.C.(AltonBarnes) 
Hare, Aug. Will. (Alton Barnes) 
Hare,J.(.VofStrattonSt.Margaret) 
Hare T. 
?Harford, John S. 



Harris, Hon. Chas. Amyand (V. of 

Bremhill ; Archdeacon of Wilts) 
Harris, Henry, (R. of Winter - 

bourne Bassett) 
Harris, James (Salisbury) [bury) 
Harris. James (1st Earl of Malmes- 
Harris, Will., D.D. (Salisbury) 
Harrison, Charles 
Harrison, Francis(R. of N.Wraxall) 
Harrison J. (Devizes) 
Harrison, W. (Devizes) 
^Harrison, W. Jerome 
Hart, Mary (Calne) 
Harte, Walter (Marlborough) 
Hartigan, A. S. (C. of Bromham) 
Haskett-Smith, W. P. 
Haskins, Charles (Salisbury) 
Hasted, Edward (Corsham) 
Hastings, J.D. (R. of Trowbridge) 
Hatcher, Hen. (Salisbury) 
Hautenville, R. W. (R. of Yatton 

Keynell) 
Haweis, J. O. W. 
Hawles, John (Salisbury) 
Hawthorn, John 
Haydock, Richard (Salisbury) 
Hayter, Richard (Salisbury) 
Hay ward Abraham (Wilton) 
Haywood, Will., D.D. 
Hazlitt, Will. Sen. (Winterslow) 
Head, Hen. (Amesbury) 
Headley, Alex. Hardenhuish) 
Healey, C. E. H. C. (Chancellor of 

Sarum Diocese) 
meath, F. G. 
?Heath, F. R. 

Heathcote, T. G. J. (Melksham) 
Hele, R. (Salisbury) 
Hemington, C (Devizes) 
Henchman, H umph. ( Bp.of Salisb.) 
Henderson, Robert 
Henley, E. H. (Calne) 
Henslow, T. G. W. (R. of Stanton 

St. Quintin) 
Henvil, Philip (S. Damerham) 
^Herbert, Algernon 
Herbert, George (R. of Bemerton) 
Herbert, Rt. Hon. Sidney (Wilton) 
^Herbert, Thos. 
Herbert of Lea, Lady (Wilton) 
Hertford, Frances, Countess of 

(Longleat) 
Hertford, Marquess of 
Hewlett, E. (C. of Calne) 
Hewlett, Maurice (Broad Chalke) 
Heytesbury, Lord (Heytesbury) 
Heytesbury, Will. 



By the Rev. E. H. Goddard. 



221 



Hibberd, Josiali (All Cannings) 
Hickman, Thomas (R. of Upton 
Lovell) [avon) 

Hicks Beach, Sir Michael (N ether- 
Hildebrand, W. (R. of E.Coulston) 
Hildrop, John D.D. (V. of Great 

Bedwyn) 
Hill, Aaron (Malmesbury) 
Hill, A. Du B. (V. of Downton) 
Hill, Adam (V. of Westbury) 
Hill, Edward (V. of Little Lang- 
ford ; R. of Wishford) 
Hill, Geoffry (V. of Harnham) 
Hill, James Hamlyn, DD. (V. of 

Urchfont) 
Hill, Rowland (Broadchalke) 
Hill, Sam. (Kilmington) 
Hill, Will. Burroughs 
Hillier, Will. 
Hillman, E. H. 

Hinder, Eustace F. (Melksham) 
Hinton, Edward (Marlborough) 
Hinxman, Emmeline 
?Hissey, J. J. 
Hitchman, Will. (Poulton, now in 

Gloucester ?) 
Hoadley, Benj. (Bp. of Salisbury) 
Hoadley, John (Archdeacon of 
Sarum ; Archbishop of Armagh) 
?Hoare, Capt. H. E. 
Hoare, Sir Henry (Stourhead) 
Hoare, Sir Rich. Colt (Stourhead) 
Hobbes, Thomas (Malmesbury) 
Hobhouse, Benj. 
Hobhouse, Mrs. C. E. 
Hobhouse, Sir Charles Parry 

( M onkton Farleigh) 
[Hobhouse, Sir John Cam., see 

Broughton, Lord] 
Hodgson, C. H. (V. of Boscombe) 
Hodgson, Christopher 
Hodgson, J. D. (R.of Coll. Ducis) 
Holgate, C. W. (Salisbury) 
Holland, Francis (R. of Sutton ?) 
Holland, Lord (Winterslow) 
Holmes, Nath. (Kingswood) 
?Holmes, Oliver Wendell 
Hony, G. B. (Bishops Cannings) 
Hooker,Richard (R.of Boscombe) 
?Hope, Sir W. H. St. J. 
Horler, Joseph (Wilton) 
Horlock, H. D. C. S. (V. of Box) 
Horlock, K., Will. 
Horman, Will. (Salisbury) 
?Horne-Tooke, J. 
?Horneck, Anthony 
Horsell, Capt. (Wootton Bassett) 



Hotchkis,T. (Stanton Fitzwarren) 
Houlbrook, Will. (Marlborough) 
"Howard, Christopher" (=Mrs. 

Withers) 
Howard, Edward (Charlton) 
Howard, Hon. Edward (Charlton) 
Howard, Lady Frances (Charlton) 
Howard, H. C. (Vicar of Aldb'ne) 
Howard, Sir Robert (Charlton) 
Howard, Sir Robert (Vasterne, 

Wootton Bassett) 
Ho wells, Will. Dean 
Hoyle, Charles (V. of Overton) 
Hubert, D. G. (Salisbury) 
Hughes, Jabez (Marlborough) 
Hughes, John (Marlborough) 
Hull, Henry 

Hulme, F. E. (Marlborough?) 
Hume, G. S. (V. of Melksham) 
Hume, John (Bp. of Salisbury) 
Hungerford, Sir Edward 
Hunt, E. 

?Hunt, Henry (Upavon ; Enford) 
Hunt, Thomas (Salisbury) 
Hunter, Joseph 
Hunter, Sir Robert 
Huntingford, G. I. (R. of Corsley) 
Huntingford,Thomas ( Warm'ster) 
Hunton, Phil. (Avebury ; V. of 
Westbury) 

?Hurdis, James, D.D. 
Hurle, Mary (Marlborough) 
Hurst, C P. (Great Bedwyn) 
Hussey, Eyre (V. of Lyneham) 
Hutchings, R. S. (V. of Alderbury) 
Hutchins,Edward(Preb.of Sarum) 
Hutchinson, H.N. (Broad Chalke) 
Hutchinson, T. N. (Broad Chalke) 
Huth, Alfred H. (Fosbury) 
Hyde, Alex. (Bp. of Salisbury) 
Im Thurn, Everard F. (Marlboro') 
Impey, Elijah (Amesbury) 

?Ingram, A. H. Winnington 
Ingram, James, D.D. (Codford 
St. Mary) 

Unnes, John 

?Inwards, Richard 

^Ireland, Arthur, J. [Malford) 

Itchener, W. (R. of Christian 
Ivie, John (Salisbury) 
Ivie, Thomas (Malmesbury) 
Jackson, E. D. (Warminster) 
Jackson, J. E. (R.of Leigh Delam'e) 

?James, Col., Sir Hen. 
Jay, Will. (Tisbury) 
Jeboult, J. H. (Salisbury) 
Jefferay, Richard 



222 



Existing Materials for Wiltshire Bibliography. 



Jefferies, Mrs. ("Ella Marsh") 
(Spirt-hill, in Bremhill) [don) 
Jefferies, Rich. (Coate, in Chisel- 
Jeff ery, Will. (Westbury) 
Jekyll, Thomas (R. of Rowde) 
Jennings, Jos. Cave Spicer (Mal- 

mesbury) 
Jerram, J. R. (Salisbury) 
Jervis, W. H. (Preb. of Meytesb'y) 
Jewell, John (Bp. of Salisbury) 
?Jocelyne, Eliz. [Cannings) 

Johns, Bennett Geo. (R. of All 
Johnson, J. H. (V. of Tilshead) 
Jones, Harry (Malmesbury) 
?Jones, H. (Bath) 
?Jones, Inigo 
Jones, Jacob (Melksham) 
?Jones, T. Rupert 
Jones, Will (Ramsbury) 
Jones, W. H. H. (Trowbridge) 
Jones, (Rich-Jones) Will. Hen. 

(Bradford) 
Joy, H. H. (Hartham) 
Judd, Will. A. (Maddington) 
?Jukes-Browne, A. J. 
?Kains-Jackson, C. P. 
Keate, Geo. (Trowbridge) 
Keel, David 
?Kell, Rev. E. 
Kelsey, Joseph (Archdeacon of 

Sarum ; R, of Newton Toney) 
Kemm, Thos. (Avebury) 
Kemm, W. C. (Amesbury) 
Kempster, E. 

Kendall, H. G. O. (R. of Winter- 
bourne Bassett) 
Kennedy, James (Wilton) 
?Kerslake, Thos. 
Keymis, Lawrence 
Kibblewhite, James (M.P., Woot- 

ton Bassett) 
Killick, R. Hen. (V. of Erchfont) 
Kilvert, Rev. F. 
King, Bryan (V. of Avebury) 
King,Dan.( V.of Winterb'ne Stoke) 
King, Lt. Edward (Seend) 
King, Harriett Rebecca 
Kingdon, H. T. 

Kingsbury, Thomas Luck (V. 
& R. Easton Royal, Burbage, 
Coombe Bissett) 
Kingsland, J. P. (Devizes ?) 
Kingston, Duchess of (Bradford) 
?Kirby, T. F. 

Kite, Edward (Seend ; Devizes) 
?Kjederquist, John 
Knubley, E. P. (V. of St. Ashton) 



Knyvett, Sir Hen. (Charlton) 
L., E. (Holt) 
L., T. (Preb. of Sarum) 
Lakin, S. M . (Salisbury) 
Lambert, Aylmer B. (Boyton) 
Lambert, John 
Lancaster, J. L. 
Lander, Will. (Mere) 
Langstaff, Geo. (Wilton) 
Lansdowne, Hen., Marquis of 
Lansdowne, H. C K., Marquis of 
Lansdowne, Will., 1st Marquis of 
Large, John (Chippenham, Woot- 

ton Bassett, Lyneham) 
Lathom, Paul (Preb. of Sarum) 
Latimer, Hugh (Bp. ; R. of W. 

Kington) 
Law, Miss L. A. [ford) 

Law, R. V. (R. of Christian Mal- 
Lawes, Edward (Chippenham) 
Lawes, Hen. (Dinton) 
Lawes, John 
Lawes, Will. 

Lawrence, Thomas, sen. (Devizes) 
Lawrence, Rev. Thos. 
Lawrence, Sir Thos., Devizes. 
Lawrence, T. J. (LL.D. ; R. of 

Upton Lovel) 
Lawrence, W. F. (Whiteparish) 
Lawson, G. N. Gray (V. of Dilton 

Marsh ; R. of Littleton Drew) 
LeCras, Abraham J. (Salisbury) 
?Le Gallienne, Richard 
Leach, John Hen. (Hurdcott in 

Baverstock) 
Lear, Francis, senr. (Archdeacon 

of Sarum ; Dean of Sarum) 
Lear, Francis, jun. (Archdeacon of 

Sarum, R. of Bishopstone) 
Lear, Henrietta Louisa (Mrs. 

Sidney Lear) (Salisbury) 
Leask, Dr. Will. (Chapmanslade) 
Ledwich, Edward (Salisbury 1) 
Lee,Edw'd (Chancellor of Sarum ; 

Archbishop) 
Legg, John (M. Lavington) 
Leland, John (Preb. of Sarum) 
Lemoine, Abraham (Everley) 
?Lewis, A. L. 
Lewis, D. J. 
Ley,Sir Francis, Earl of Marlboro' 

(Teffont Evias, Westbury) 
Liddon, H. P. (Preb. of Sarum) 
Light, Mary 
?Linton, Will. 

Lipscombe, Chr. (V. of Sutton 
Benger 



By the Bev. E. H, Goddard. 



223 



?Lipscomb, G. 
ILisle, Edward 

Little, Edward (Chippenham) 

Little, Mary (Slaughterford) 

Little wood, S. (C. of Edington) 

Lloyd,J.A.(V.of B'd Hinton;Mere) 

Locke, Albinia (Seend) 

Locke, F. A. S. (Rowde) 
^Lockwood, Edward 
?Lockyer, Sir Norman 

Long, Charles Edward 

Long, Geo. (Ogbourne 1 ?) 
?Long, Kingsmill 

Long, Sir James (Draycot) 

Long, Rt. Hon. Walter H. (Rood 

Ashton) 
ILong, Will. (Wrington, Som.) 

Longspee, Nich. (Bp. of Sarum) 

Longmire, James Fox (West- 
wood ; Winkfield) 

Longstaff, John C. 

Longland, John (Dean of Sarum) 

Lovibond, Catherine (Lake) 

Lovibond,J. W.(Salisbury & Lake) 

Low, Hen. (Salisbury) 

Low, James (Pewsey) 

Lowe, Robert (Ld. Sherbrooke, 
M.P., Calne) 

Lowther, Gorges, Esq. 

Lowther, Gorges P. (R. of Orches- 
ton St. George) 

Lucas, Charles (C. of Avebury 
and Devizes) 

Lucas, John (Salisbury) 

Lucas, Thomas 

Ludlow, Edmund (Hill Deverill) 

Lukis, W. C. (V. of East Grafton ; 
Gt. Bedwyn ; Coll. Ducis) 

Lumby, John (R. of St. Martin's, 
Salisbury) 

Lye, Mr. (M. Lavington) 
?Lyell, Sir Charles 

M. G. (Donhead Lodge) 

Macdonald, Fitzherbert (S'sbury) 

Macdonald, F. W. (R. of Wishf'd) 

Macdonald, Will. (Archdeacon of 
Wilts ; V. of Bp's. Cannings) 

Macey, E. H. (Salisbury) 

Macleane, Douglas (R. of Codford 
St. Peter) 

Majendie, G. J. (V. of Stanton St. 
Bernard ; R. of Heddington) 

Maihew, Edward (Salisbury) 

Maitland, John 

? Major, Albany F. 

Malan, A. H. 

Maiden, A. R. (Salisbury) 



Malet, Sir Alex (Wilbury) 
Malet, H. P. [Harris) 

Malmesbury, 1st Earl of (James 
Malmesbury, Monk of 
Malmesbury, Will, of 
Man, John (Lacock) [Magna) 

Manley, F. H. (R. of Somerford 

?Mann, R. 

Mann, T. (Trowbridge) 
Mansfield, Geo. (Trowbridge) 

?Mant, Newton 

?Mantell, G. A. 
Marlborough, Hen. of 
Marlborough, Thomas de 
Marriott, Walter (C. of Holt) 
Marryatt, Geo. S. (Salisbury) 
Marsh, Narcissus (Hannington) 
Marsh, Will. (Calne) [loways) 
Marshall, Charles (Tytherton Kel- 
Marshall, E. S. (V. of Keevil) 

^Marshall, Emma 
Marshall, T. A. (Nunton) 

Marshall, Will. [Leigh) 

Marshman, Joshua (Westbury 

1 Martin, Benj. 
Martin, John (Mere ; V. of Comp- 

ton Chamberlayne) 
Martin, Thomas (Warminster) 
Martyn, Thomas (M.P. for Hin- 

don and Ludgershall) 
Maschiart, Michael (Salisbury) 
Maskell, Rev. Will. 
Maskelyne, Anthony St. J. Story 

(Hatt House) 
Maskelyne, E. Story (Lydiard) 
Maskelyne, Mervyn H.Nevil Story 

(Basset Down) 
Maskelyne, Nevill (Purton,Astro- 

nomer Royal) 
Maskelyne, Theresa Story (Basset 

Down) 
Massinger, Philip (Salisburv) 
Master, G. S. (V. of West Dean) 
Masterman, N. (Marlborough) 
Masters, Sam (Salisbury) 
Masters, W. Caldwell (R. of Stan- 
ton Fitzwarren) 
Matcham, Geo. (Newhouse) 
Matcham, Mary E. (Newhouse) 
Maton, G. (M.D.) 
Maton, Robert (Tidworth) 
Maton, Will. George (Salisbury) 
Matthew, Sir Tobie (Salisbury) 

?Matthews, A. J. 

Maundrell, Herbert (Calne, Arch- 
deacon of S. Japan) [set) 
Maundrell, Hen. (Compton Bas- 



224 



Existing Materials for Wiltshire Bibliography . 



May, Mrs. (Liddington) 

Mayo, Charles (R. of Beeching- 

stoke) 
Mayo, Joseph (Devizes) 
Mayow, Mayow Wynell (V. of M. 

Lavington) 
?Mayow, 4 Sebastian Wynell 
McEvoy, Charles (Aldbourne) 
McKnight, Will. H. E. (Lydiard 

Millicent) 
?McLain, Robert 
McMillan, C. D. H.(V.of Malmes- 

bury) 
Meade, Edward (R. of Winkfield) 
M eade, Lt. The Hon. H erbert 
Medlicott, H. E., sen. (Potterne) 
Medlicott, Capt. H. E. (Potterne) 
?Meehan,J. F. (Bath) 
Meek,Robert (C. of Yatton K'nell) 
Merewether, Hen. Alworth (I.), 

D.C.L., Q.C. (Calne) 
Merewether, Hen. Alworth (II), 

Q.C.(BowdenHill) 
Merewether, John, D.D. (Dean of 

Hereford) 
Merriman, It. V. (Marlborough) 
Merriman, Robert W. (Marlboro') 
Merriman, Sam. (I.) (Marlboro') 
Merriman. Sam. (II.) (Marlboro') 
Merriott, Thos. (Steeple Ashton) 
Metcalfe, C. F.(V.of Whiteparish) 
1 Metcalfe, John Hen. 
Metcalfe, W. C. 
Methuen, Gen. Lord (Cor sham) 
Methuen, Mrs. L. M. 
Methuen, Thos. Anthony (R. of 

All Cannings) 
Meux, Lady (Dauntsey) 
Meyrick, Edward, F.R.S. (Rams- 
bury ; Marlborough) 
Meyrick, Fred. (Ramsbury) 
Michael, Sam. (Notton) 
Michael, W. (Westbury) 
Middleton, A. B. (Salisbury) 
Milburn, J. (Marlborough) 
Miles, Clarisse (Malmesbury) 
Miles, Thomas (Stockton) 
Milford, R.N. (R. of E. Knoyle) 
Millard, Geo. (R. of Calstone ; V. 

of Box) 
Millet, John 

?Milner, John [does) 

?Mitchinson, John (Bp. of Barba- 
Moberly, Geo. (Bp. of Salisbury) 
Moberly, Geo. H. (Salisbury) 
Moberly, Robt. C. (Salisbury) 
Moffat, John M. (Malmesbury) 



Mogg, H. H. (V. of Chittoe and 
Bishops Cannings) [bury) 

Money, J. Stoughton(R. of \ates- 
Money, Capt. Rowland 

Money, Walter, F.S.A. 
Montagu, Col. Geo. (Lackham) 
Monteath, R. R. (V. of Studley) 

?Moody, Hen. 
Moon, Joseph (Salisbury) 
Moore,Cecil G.( V.of BroadChalke) 
Moore, J. B. 
Moore, Thomas (Bromham) 

?Moore, Hannah 
Morgan, H. (Purton) 
Morgan, J. H. (Wootton Bassett) 

?Morgan, Owen 

?Morgan, Thomas 
Morley, G. (R. of Mildenhall) 
Morre's, A. P. (V. of Britford) 
Morres, Robert (V. of Britford) 
Morrice, W. D. (Preb. of Salisb'y) 
Morris, Peleg (Devizes) 
Morris, Will. (Swindon) 
Morrison, Dorothy (Fonthill) 
" Mouldy, Malachi " 
Moulton, Stephen (Bradford) 
Mount, C. M. (V. of Hannington) 
Mountain, Anne 
Mountagu, James (Lackham) 
M ozley,Harriett Eliz. (Choldert'n) 
Mozley, Thomas (R. of Cholderton) 
Muffett (Mouffett) Thos. (Wilton) 
Mullins, Geo. (V. of Box) 
Mullins, W. E. (Marlborough) 

? Murray, John 
Mylne, Louis G. (Bp. ; V. of St. 

Mary's, Marlborough) 
Mynors, A. B. (R. of Langley 

Burrell) 
Naish, Thos. (Sb.-Dean of Sarum) 
Nelson, Horatio, 3rd Earl (Tra- 
falgar) 
Nevill, Edward R. (Salisbury) 
Newbolt, Sir Hen. (Netherhamp- 

ton) 
Newby,Mrs.,"EmmaWarburton" 
(Draycot Cerne) 

?Newton, Charles 
Newton, John 

Nicholas, Sir Edward (Winter- 
bourne Earls) 

?Nicholas, N. H. 

^Nicholas, Lt. P. H. 

^Nicholas, T. 
Nichols, John Bowyer 

^Nichols, John Gough 

^Nicholson, Dr. B. 



By the Rev. E % H. Goddard* 



225 



Nightingale, James Ed. (Wilton) 
INilsson, Prof. Sven 
Norden, John 

Norris, John (R. of Bemerton) 
Norris, John (V. of Coll. Ducis ; 

R. of Aldbourne) 
Northey, Sir Ed. 
Norton, John 
Nott, J. (Maiden Bradley) 
Noyes, Ella (Sutton Veney) 
Ogle, N. (Canon of Sarum) 
Olding, Joseph (Woodford) 
lOliver, Geo., D.D. 
Oliver, V. L. 
^Oliver, S. P. 

Olivier, Dacres (R. of Wilton) 
Olivier, Hen. A. (R. of Poulshot) 
?Ord, C. E. Blackett 
Osborne, J. Lee 
Osmond, Will., Jun. 
Osmund, St. (Bp. of Salisbury) 
Otley,H.L.(VVinterbourneBassett) 
Ottley, Mrs. ("Deborah Prim- 
rose," Winterborne Bassett) 
Overton, Thos. Collins 
Owen, Thos. (Upton Scudamore) 
Page- Roberts, Will (D'nof Sarum) 
Palgrave, Sir Reg. F. D. (Salisb'y) 
Palmer, C. F. R. 

Panke, John (V. of Broad Hinton) 
Paradise, John (Westbury) 
J Paris, John A. (M.D.) 
Parker, Robt. (R. of Patney ; V. 

of Stanton St. Bernard) 
Parry, Dorothy Clive (Calne) 
Parry, Hen. (D.D.) [Wilts) 

Parry, Jos. Hen. (Allington, N. 
Parsons, Barth. (R, of Ludger- 

shall ; V. of Coll. Kingston) 
Parsons, G. H. (V. of Tidcombe) 
Parsons, Ric.( Westbury ; Corsley) 
Parsons, Thos. 

Parsons, W. F. (Wootton Bassett) 
Passmore, A. D. (Swindon) 
Patteson, Thos. (R. of Patney) 
Pavy, F. W.(Wroughton?) 
Payne, R. (V. of Downton) 
Peacock, Edward (V.of Road Hill) 
Pearce, Charles, W. (Salisbury) 
Pearce, J. Channing (Bradford) 
Pearce, John (Upton Scudamore) 
Pearsall, Richard 
Pearson, Mrs. (Shrewton) 
Pearson, N. H. (Dean of Sarum) 
Pedder, Col. D.C. (Ogbourne) 
1 Belling, Edward 
Pelling, John 

VOL XL. — NO. CXXIX. 



Pembroke, Anne, Countess of 
Pembroke, George R. C.,13th Earl 
Pembroke, Hen. Herbert, 9th Earl 
Pembroke, Mary Sidney, Countess 
Pembroke, Phil. Herbert 4th Earl 
Pembroke, Phil. Herbert, 7th Earl 
Pembroke, B eg. H erbert, 1 5th Earl 
Pembroke, Sidney Herbert, 14th 

Earl 
Pern broke, Thos. Herbert, 8th Earl 
Pembroke, Will. Herbert, 3rd Earl 
Penney, Norman (Melksham) 
Penny, Robt. Geo. (V. of Long- 
bridge Deverill) 
Penruddocke, Charles (I.)(Comp- 

ton Chamberlayne) 
Penruddocke, Ch. (II.) (Compton 
Chamberlayne)[Chamberlayne) 
Penruddocke, Ch. (III.)(Compton 
Penruddocke,Charlesana Postuma 
Penruddocke, Helen a C. 
Penruddocke, Col. John (Compton 

Chamberlayne) 
Penruddocke, Mrs 
Penruddocke, T. A. (R.of Everley) 
? Perkins, T. 
P terborough, Ch. Mordant, Earl 

of (Dauntsey) 
?Petrie, W. M. Flinders 
?Pettigrew, T. J. 
Phelps, W. W. (Wilton) 
?Phene, J. S. 

Philipps, Sir James Erasmus( War- 
minster) 
?Phillipps, Sir Thomas 
Phipps, E. J. (R. of Devizes) 
Pickering, Ellen (Bulford) 
?Picton, Sir J. A. 
Picton, J. O. (C. of Chippenham) 
Pidding,(— )(R.of Yatton Yeynell) 
Pierce, Ruth ( Potter ne) [Sarum) 
Pierce, Thos. (Devizes, (Dean of 
Pile, L. J. Acton 
?Pinkney, Lt.-Col. 
Pinnell, Hen. (Brink worth) [sett) 
Pinner, Ch. (V. of Wootton Bas- 
Pinniger, J. (Avebury) 
Pitman, Sir Isaac (Trowbridge) 
Pitt- Rivers, Lt.-Gen. A. H. L. F. 

( Bushmore) 
Pitt, Will., 1st Earl of Chatham 

(Stratford-sub- Castle) 
Plenderleath.W. C.(R.of Cherhill) 
Plowden, Edmund (M. P. Wootton 

Bassett) 
Plummer, Mat. (R. of Stratford 
Toney) 



226 



Existing Materials for Wiltshire Bibliography. 



Pocock, Edward (Salisbury) 
Pollen, John Hungerford (Rod- 
bourne) 
Pollen, K. (Rodbourne?) 
Ponting, C. E. (Marlborough) 
Poore, Lady (Winsley) 
Poore, Major (Winterslow) 
Poore, Edward (Tidworth) 
Poore, Sir Edward 
Poore, Richard (Bp. of Salisbury) 
?Pope, Walter, F.R.S. 
Popham, Edward, D.D. (Little- 
cote, R. of Chilton Foliat) 
Popham, Sir John (Littlecote) 
Pordage, Sam. (Wilton) 
Porter, J. F. Salisbury) [mington) 
Potter, Francis (Mere; R. of Kil- 
? Potter, T. 
Powell (— ) 

Powell, Ch. (C. of S. Marston) 
Powell, H. O. (R. of Wylye) 
Powell, J. U. (Bishopstrow) 
Powell, Maria (Melksham) 
1 Pratt, S. P. 

Preston, Thos. A. (Marlborough) 
Priaulx, John (Archd. of Sarum) 
Price, Francis (Salisbury) 
Price, John (R. of Newton Toney) 
Priestly, W. [Mrs. 

" Primrose, Deborah," see Ottley, 
Prince, John (V. of Enford) 
Prior, R. A. C. (Corsham) 
Prior, Thos. ( Bradenstoke) 
Pritchard, W. (Salisbury) 
Proctor, B, W. ("Barry Cornwall" 

Calne) 
Proffet, Nich. (R. of S. Peter's, 

Marlborough) 
? Pro vis, J. [tus," Purton) 

Prower, Maj. John Elton ("Emeri- 
Prower. Maude (Purton) 
Prower, Nelson (Purton) 
Pugh, C. S. 

Pugh, Sam. S. (Devizes) 
Pullen, Hen. Will. (Salisbury) 
Purdy, Rich. (U.D., R. of Ashley ; 

V. of Cricklade St. Sampson) 
Queensberry,Marq. of(Amesbury) 
?Quintine, Michael [Salisbury) 
Radcliffe, Geo. (St. Edmund's, 
Radnor, Helen Matilda,Countessof 
Radnor, Jacob, Earl of 
Raleigh, Walter (DoWn ton) 
1 Ramsay, Sir A. C. 
Randolph, Mrs. ("Evelyn St. 

Ledger," Eastcourt House) 
Raven- Hill, L. (Bromham) 



Ravenhill, W. W. (Heytesbury) 
Ravenshaw,Thos.F.(R. of Pewsey) 
Rawlence, Ernest A. (Salisbury) 
Rawlence, Guy 
Rawling, Joseph (Bradford) 
Read, (J. J. (Salisbury) 
Read, D. C. (Salisbury) 
Read, R. W. (Salisbury) 
Redfern, T. L. (R. of Ashley) 
Rees, J. R. (Salisbury) 
Rees, T. Needham (Devizes) 
Rendell, Fred. (Tidcombe) 

1 Rensselaer, M. G. Van 

?Rew, R. H. 

Reynolds, Stephen (Devizes) 
Rhodes, Will. (Damerham) 

?Ricardo, David (Hardenhuish) 
Richardson, Mrs. Herbert(Wilton) 
Richardson, J. E. (Salisbury) 

% Richardson, John, F.R.S. 

?Rickman, John [bury) 

Ridge way, Fred Ed. (Bp. of Sali's- 
Ripley, Jeremy J. (Won Bassett 1) 
Ripley, Thomas Hyde (V. of 

Wootton Bassett) 
Robbins, Mills 
Roberts, Geo. 
Roberts, Mary 
Roberts, Sam. (Salisbury?) 
Robertson, Thos. (Preb. of Sarum) 
Robinson, J. (Wilton) 
Rochester, Earl of (Spye Park) 
Rodbard, Sarah 
Rodway, James (Trowbridge) 
Rod well, G. F. (Marlborough) 

?Rcemer, Mary von (or de) [ton) 
Rogers, FrancisNewman(S.Newn- 
Rogers, Ruth (Devizes) 
Rogers, Rowland (Warminster) 
Rolles, Will. (R. of Upton Love!) 
Roots, Rich (R. of Chilmark) 
Rose, John (Amesbury) 
Rosewell, Thos. (R. of Sutton 
Mandeville) [bury) 

Ross, John Lockhart (V. of Ave- 
?Rowe, John 

?Rowell, G. A. 

Ruddle. C. S. (V. of Durrington) 
Rudkin, Messin, (V. of Froxfield) 
Rumsey, D. G. Wilson [Wilts) 
Rundle, Thos. (Archdeacon of 
Russell, Joshua (Melksham) 

?Ryland, John 

Sacheverell, Hen. (Marlborough) 
Sadler, Anthony (Chilton) 
Sadler, John 
Sadler, Robert (Chippenham) 



By the Rev. Ei H, Goddard. 



227 



Saffery, Maria Grace (Salisbury'?) 
Sage, W. Cary (Bratton) 
St. John, Oliver(Lydiard.Tregoze) 
St. John, see Bolingbroke, Lord 
"St. Ledger Evelyn," see Ran- 
dolph, Mrs. 
St. Maur, Ld. Edward 
Salisbury, John of 
Salmon, John C. (Highworth) 
?Salmon, T. S. 

Sampson, Rich. (Canon of Sarum) 
Sanders. Harry (Trowbridge) 
Sangar, Gabriel (V. of St. Ashton) 
Sangar, James M. (C. of Calne) 
Saunders, Ann ( Market Lavington) 
Saunders, J. [Lavington) 

Saunders, Will. (M.P., Market 
Scanes, John (Maiden Bradley) 
?Scarth, Preb. H. M. 
Schomberg, Arthur (Seend) 
Schomberg, Isaac (Seend) 
Schomberg, Joseph T. 
Scott, John (Chippenham) 
Scroggs, Sir Will. [Combe) 

Scrope, Geo. Powlett (Castle 
Scrope, John (D.D. ; K of Castle 

Combe) 
Scrope, Rich. (D D., Chicklade) 
?Scrope, Sir Richard 
Scrope, Will. (Castle Combe) 
Scudder, Hen. (R, of Coll. Ducis) 
Scurlock David (V. of Potterne) 
Searchfield, Emilie (Knook) 
Season, Dr. Henty (Bromham) 
Seaton, Will. (Salisbury) 
Securis, John (Salisbury) 
Sedgwick, John (Marlborough ; V. 

of Ogbourne St. Andrew) 
Sedgwick, Joseph (Ogbourne St. 

Andrew) 
Sedgwick,Obadiah (Marlborough) 
Sedgewick, Will. (Marlborough 1) 
?Senior, W. S. [Stoke) 

Settle, Sam. (V. of Winterbourne 
Seymour, Sir Edward, Bart. [Ld. 
Seymour of Sudeley, Sir Thomas 
Seymour of Trowbridge, Francis 

Ld. 
Seymour, see also Somerset 
Shaftesbury,Anth.Ashley Cooper, 

1st Earl (M.P. Wilts) 
Sharington, Sir Will. (Lacock) 
Shaw, John (D.D., East Knoyle) 
Shaxton, Nich. (Bp. of Sarum) 
Shelburne, Earl {see Lansdowne, 

Marquis of) 
?Shelley, P. M. 



[Sherbrooke, Ld., see Lowe, Robt.] 
Sherfield, Hen. (Salisbury) 
Sherlock, Tho3. (Bp. of Salisbury) 
Short, Geo. (^Salisburv) 
Short, Walter F. (R, of Donhead 

St. Mary) 
Shum, Fred. 

Shuttleworth, J. (Fifield) 
Shuttleworth, P. N. (Foxley) 
Sidmouth. 1st Viscount (M.P., 

Devizes) 
Simcox, H. K. (R. of Patney) 
Simpson, Will. (Chippenham) 
Sims, Will. (Devizes) 
?Sinnett, A. P. 
Skinner, John (R. of Poulshot ; V. 

of Shrewton) [sham) 

Skurray, Francis (C. of Horning- 
Skuse, T. (Pickwick) 
?Sleigb, S. 

Slow, Edward (Wilton) 
Smart, Newton, (V. of Alderbury 

& Farley) 
Smith, Alfred Charles (R.of Yates- 

bury) 
?Smith, C. Roach 
Smith, E. F. Pye (Salisbury) 
Smith, E. H. 

Smith, Edmund (Hartham) 
Smith, Geo. (Salisbury) 
Smith, Geo. (Trowbridge) 
Smith, Hen. (M.D. Salisbury) 
Smith, Hen. Herbert (Calne) 
Smith, Horace 
Smith, James 

Smith, John (Market Lavington) 
^Smith, Dr. John [ham) 

Smith, Maxwell H (V. of Chippen- 
Smith, R. P. (Marlborough) 
Smith, S. A. (Salisbury) 
Smith, Thomas (Shaw House) 
Smith, Thos Assheton (Tidworth) 
Smith, T. C. (Salisbury) 
Smith, W. Francis (Calne) 
Smyth, Jackson J. (C. of Broad 

Blunsdon) 
Snailum, J. (Trowbridge) 
Soames, Charles (R.of Mildenhall) 
Somerset,lAlgernonPercySt.Maur, 
14th Duke [Duke 

Somerset, Charles Seymour, 6th 
Somerset, Edward, Ld. Protector, 

Duke of 
Somerset, Ed. Adolphus Seymour, 

12th Duke 
Somerset, Susan, Duchess of 
Sowerby, J. (Marlborough) 

s 2 



228 



Existing Materials for Wiltshire Bibliography. 



Spencer, John (Bo wood) 
Spinkes, Nath. (Preb. of Sarum) 
Spinney, Thos. Ed. (Salisbury) 
Sprint, John( Archdeacon of Wilts) 
?Sprules, John 

Squarey, Elias Pitts (Downton) 
Squire, Sam. (Warminster) 
?8tackhouse, Thos. 
Stamper, J. (Swindon) 
Stanford, Charles (Devizes) 
Stapleton, J. W. (Trowbridge) 
?Stark, Adam 

Starkey, Sam. (Wootton Bassett) 
Stead, Francis R. (Salisbury) 
Stebbing, Hen. (Archd of Wilts) 
Stennett, Joseph 
Stephens, Hen. C. (Cholderton) 
?Stephens, Hugh 

Stephens, J. O. (V. of Savernake) 
Stephens, Nath. (Stanton St. Ber- 
nard) 
Stephens, Phil. (Devizes) [ton) 
Stepney, Catherine Lady (Grittle- 
Stevens, Ed. T. (Salisbury) 
Stevens, Frank (Salisbury) 
Stevenson, Will. (Preb. of Sarum) 
Stewart, H F. (Salisbury) 
Stewart, Ravenscroft (Archdeacon 

of N. Wilts, Chippenham) 
Still, John (R. of Fonthill Gifford 

and Chicklade) 
Stokes, C. (Damerham) 
Stokes Edward 
Stone, Edward 
Stone, Brig.-Gen. F. G. 
Stonhouse, Sir James (R. of Gt. 

Cheverell) 
Strange, Robert (Somerford) 
Stratford, Joseph 
Straton, Amy Mary (Wilton) 
Straton, A. W. K (Wilton) 
Straton, Charles Robert (Wiltou) 
Stratton, Fred 

Stratton, James (Broad Hinton) 
Stratton, J. Maria 
Stratton, Richard (Broad Hinton) 
Streeter, G. T. P. (R. of Orcheston 

St. Mary) 
Stribling, S. B. 

Strickland, John (R. of St. Ed- 
mund's, Salisbury) 
Strong, Aug. (V. of St. Paul's, 

Chippenham) 
.Stukeley, Rev. Dr. Will. 
Suffolk, Henrietta, Countess of 
Suffolk, Hen. C. Howard, 18th 
Earl (Charlton) 



Swaffield, John (R. of Odstock) 
Swayne, Henry James F. (Wilton) 
Swayne, R. G. (Salisbury) 
Swinstead, J. H. (Salisbury) 
Sykes, Arthur A. (Salisbury) 
Symonds, W. (V. of Sherston) 
Tait, Mrs. W. J. (Salisbury) 
Talbot, Charles Hen. (Lacock) 
Talbot, Will. (Bp.of Salisbury) 
Talbot, Will. Hen. Fox (Lacock) 
Talman ( — ) (Salisbury) 
Tanner, Thos. (M. Lavington ; 
Bishop of St. Asaph) 

?Tate, Dr. G. R. 
Tatum, E. J. (Salisbury) 
Tayler, Adm. J. H. (Devizes) 
Taylor, Adam (Devizes) 
Taylor, Alec. (Manton) 
Taylor, C. S. 
Taylor, Harriett (Calne) 
Taylor, Isaac (Calne) 

?Teall, J. J. H. 
Teale, W. H. (R. of Devizes) 

?Teasdale, W. 

Temple, Ebenezer (Birdbush) 
Temple, Will. (Trowbridge) 
Tennant, Pamela, see Glenconner, 

Lady 
Terry, John (R. of Stockton) 
"Theta"( Woodford) 

?Thicknesse, Phil. 
Thomas, Benj. (Malmesbury) 
Thomas, E.T.W.(C.of Melksham) 
Thomas, Evan (Devizes) 
Thomas, John ( Bp. of Salisbury) 
Thomas, John Shearme ( M arlbro') 
Thomas, Robert (M.D. Salisbury) 
Thomas, R. E. (Salisbury) 
Thompson, F. E. (Marlborough) 
Thompson, Rachael (Malmesb'y) 
Thompson, Richard (V. of St. 

Mary's, Marlborough) 
Thompson, Sam. (Westbury) 
Thornborough, John (R. of Chil- 

mark ; Bp. of Worcester) 
Thornbury, Walter 
Thorpe, Hen. (V. of Preshute) 
Thorpe, John (Chippenham) 
Thurnam, John, M.D., F.S.A., 

(Devizes) 
Thynne, Ld. Charles (Longleat) 
Thynne, Harriett Frances, Lady 

Charles (Longleat) 
Thynne, Ld. John (Longleat) 
Thynne, Thomas (Longleat) 

fThynne, Will. 
Tidman, Arthur (Salisbury) 



By the Bev. E. H. Goddard. 



229 



Tiffin, Walter F. (Salisbury) 
Tinney, John Pern. (Salisbury) 
Tobin, John (Salisbury) 
Tombes, John (Salisbury) 
Tomlyns, Sam. (Marlborough) 
Tompkins, Benj. (Chippenham) 
Tooker, Will. (Preb. of Sarum) 
Townsend (— ) (R. of Calstone) 
Townsend, Joseph (K. of Pewsey) 
Trenchard, John (N. Bradley 1) 
Troughton, Will. (V. of St. 

Martin's, Salisbury) 
Trueman, Hen. J. (Salisbury) 
Tucker, Ambrose (Salisbury) 
Tucker, 0. 
Tucker, Mary 
Tucker, R. (Tilshead) 
Tull, J. (Shalbourne) 
Tullie, T. 
ITunnicliff, Will. 
Tunstall,Cuthb't(Dean of Sarum; 

R.of Ste Langf'd ; B.of Durham) 
Turner, Thos. 

Tuson, F. E. (V. of Minety) 
Twells, Leonard (V.of St. Mary's, 

Marlborough) 
Twining, T. (Wilsford; Charlton) 
Twining, Thos. (Trowbridge) 
Tyler, Sam. (Stockton) 
Upcott, L. E. (Marlborough) 
Veitch, John Leith (Salisbury) 
Vize, J. E. 
W. M. 

?Wade, Dr. C. H. 
Wainhouse, Will. (V. of Keevil) 
Wake, William (D.D.) 
Waldegrave, Sam. (R. of Barford 

St. Martin ; Bp. of Carlisle) 
Walker, Clement (Tockenham, 

Compton Bassett) 
IWalker, Patricius 
?Wallis, Stamford 
Walsh, AnnaMariaD.( Warminst'r) 
nValsh, J. H. [" Stonehenge"] 
Walsh, J. H. A. (R. of Bishop- 

strow) 
Walter, Hubert, ( Bp. of Salisbury) 
Waltham, John de ( Bp. of Salsb'y) 
Walton, Isaac (R. of Poulshot) 
Wansey, Hen. (Warminster) 
" Warburton, Emma," see Newby, 

Mrs. 
Warburton, John (Trowbridge) 
? Ward, Mrs. C. W. 
Ward, H. W. (Longford) 
Ward, John (I.) 
Ward,John(II.)(R.ofGt.Bedwyn) 



Ward, Seth (Bp. of Salisbury) 
Ward, Thos. (Melksham) 
1 Warneford, Sam Wilson (D.D.) 
Warner, Ferdinando (V.of Rowde) 
Warner, Rebecca 
Warner Rich. (R. of Gt. Chalfield) 
Warre, Francis (V. of Melksham ; 

R. of Bemerton) 
Warren, Edward 
Warton, John (Salisbury) 
Watkins, Ch. Fred (0. of W. 

Grinstead) 
?Watson, C. K. 
?Watson, G. L. 
Watson, J. G. (R. of Devizes) 
Watson, Lily (Mrs. Syd. Watson) 
Watson, Rich. (R. of Pewsey) 
Watson-Taylor, Geo. (Erlestoke) 
Watson-Taylor, John (Erlestoke) 
Watts, John (Heytesbury) 
Watts, John I. (Potterne) 
?Way, Albert 

Waylen, Edward (I.) (Devizes) 
Waylen, Edward (II.) 
Waylen, F. 

Waylen, G. S. A. (Devizes) 
Waylen, James (Devizes ; Etchil- 

hampton) 
Waylen, R. F. 
Wayte, Will. 
Weaver, Hen. (Calne) 
Weaver, R. (Chippenham) 
Webb, Allan Becher (Bishop ; 

Dean of Sarum) [bury) 

Webb, E. Doran (Salisbury ; Tis- 
?Webb, John 

Webbe, Geo. (V. of Steeple Ash- 
ton ; Bp. of Limerick) 
Webley, Sam. (Trowbridge) 
Weekes, W. (Chippenham) 
Weigall, Mrs. C. E. C. (Salisb'y ?) 
Wellesley, Hon. W. P. Tylney 

Long (Draycot) 
Welman, Francis (Chippenham) 
Welsh, J. F. (Bp. of Trinidad. 

Warminster) 
Wells, Edward (Corsham) 
Westbury, Lord 
Westmoreland Mildmay Fane, 

2nd Earl (Seend ; Bowden Park) 
Whatmore, A. W. 
Wheeler, C. A. (Swindon) 
Wheeler, Will. Alfred (Salisbury) 
Whish, Martin Rich. (Preb. of 

Sarum) 
HVhitaker, Will. 
Whitby, Daniel (Salisbury) 



230 



Existing Materials for Wiltshire Bibliography. 



White, Charles (Salisbury) 

White, Edmund EL 

White, John (V. of Monkton Dev- 

erill and Chirton) 
White, J. Martin 
White, Sam. (Poulshot) 
White, Thos. (Preb. of Sarum) 
Whitelocke, Bulstrode (Chilton 

Foliot) 
Whitelocke, Lt. Gen. (Ramsbury) 
Whitmarsh, Will. Burt (Coroner) 
Whytehead, Mrs. (Marlborough ; 

Warminster) 
Whytehead, H. R, (R. of Marl- 
borough ; V. of Warminster) 
Wiche, John 

Wightwick,Eliz.(D'ntsey; Ashley) 
Wiles, J. R. (Devizes) 
Wilkes, Will. (El. of Barford St. 

Martin) 
Wilkins, B. (N. Bradley) 
Wilkinson, John (R. of Broughton 

Gifford) 
Wilkinson, Mat. (V. of Bp's. 

Lavington ; Marlborough Coll.) 
Williams,Alfred Owen (Swindon ; 

S. Marston) 
Williams, Benj. (Salisbury) 
Williams, David (C. of Heytesb'y) 
Williams, Sir Erasmus (R. of 

Marlborough) 
1 Williams, J. G. 

Williams, John (Dean of Sarum) 
Williams, Rowland, D.D. (V. of 

Broad Chalke) 
Williams, T. (Melksham) 
? Williams, W. 

Williams, W. Philpott (Salisb'y ?) 
? Williamson, Alice M. 
Willis, F. M. 

Willis, Rich. (Bp. of Salisbury) 
Willis, Thos. (M.D., Gt Bedwyn) 
Wilson, J. G. (Cly.ffe Pypard) 



Wilson, Rathmell G. (Salisbury) 
Wilton, Edward (Edington ; W. 

Lavington) 
Winchester, Will. Paulet, 1st 

Marquis (Edington) 
Windle, H. E. (V. of Upavon) 
Winzar, John (Salisbury) 
Witham, Geo. (Lacock) 
Withy, Geo. (Melksham) 
Wittey, Will. [Chalke 

Witty, John Francis (Broad 
Wood, John 

Wood, P. A. L. (R. of Devizes) 
Wood, S. T. (R. of Rilperton) 
Woodall, T. J. (V. of Britford) 
Woodbridge, Benj. (Stanton Fitz- 

warren ; Salisbury) 
Woodroffe, Timothy (V. of Ingle- 
sham ; Sherston) 
Woodrow, C. J. (Salisbury) 
Woodward, R. (Seend) 
Wordsworth, Chr. (Salisbury) 
Wordsworth, John (Bp. of Salis- 
bury) 
? Worth, R. N. 

Worth, John (Marlborough) 
Wotton,Will.(D.D.,Preb.ofSarum) 
Wren, Sir Chr. (E, Knoyle) 
Wroughton.Charles(R..of Codford 

St. Peter) 
Wroughton, Mr. 
W 7 yatt, C. G. (Harnham) 
Wyatt, Mat. Digby (Rowde) 
Wyndham, Rt. Hon. Geo.(Clouds) 
Wyndham, Hen. Penruddocke 
(ComptonChamberlayne;Salisb.) 
Wyndham, Hon. Percy S. (Clouds) 
Yerbury, Edward (Trowbridge) 
Yonge, 0. F. 

Young, E. (Dean of Sarum) 
Young, F. Rowland (Swindon) 
Zouch, Rich. (Anstey) 



231 



EAST WILTSHIRE MOSSES, HEPATICS, AND LAND 

SHELLS. 1 

By Cecil P. Hurst. 

East Wiltshire Mosses. 

The following mosses were gathered in the winter and spring of 
1917 — 1918 around Great Bedwyn, which lies about seven miles 
to the south-east of Marlborough, and is near Savernake Forest 
and not very far from the county boundary between Wiltshire 
and Berkshire. This border village is situated on the soft white 
Marswpites testudinarius zone of the Upper Chalk near the apex 
of the London Basin, but the calcareous fades of the moss- 
flora is very much masked by the occurrence of Eocene out- 
liers and Pleistocene layers of sand, gravel, and clay in the 
neighbourhood. The Ken-net and Avon Canal passing through 
Great Bedwyn divides Wiltshire into the two vice-counties North 
Wilts (v. c. 7) and South Wilts (v. c. 8). All the localities and 
a number of the mosses are additional to those in my paper, " East 
Wiltshire Mosses/' {Wilts Arch. Mag , xxxix., p. 449, June, 1917). 
The arrangement and nomenclature of the Census Catalogue of 
British Mosses (1907) have been followed, and I am much indebted 
for kind assistance and notes to Messrs. H. N, Dixon, H. H. 
Knight,W.Ingham and Mr. J. A.Wheldon. The list contains sixteen 
new vice-comital records for Wiltshire, the greater number of which 
were made close to Great Bedwyn, and forcibly illustrates the maxim 
that the more a district is examined the more it produces. 7 = 
North Wilts. 8 = South Wilts, c. fr. = with fruit. * = new vice- 
comital record. 

1 A large part of these notes on mosses were printed under the title "East 
Wiltshire Mosses and Hepatics" in The Journal of Botany, vol. 56, June, 
1918, pp. 181 — 186: and the considerable additions now printed will also 
appear in the same Journal in a future issue. 



232 East Wiltshire Mosses , Hematics, and Land Shells. 

Polytrichum nanum (Neck.)— 7*. c. fr, Rather plentiful 
in an old excavation for gravel near London Ride, Savernake 
Forest: abundant and c. fr. in old excavations for gravel just to 
the south of the London and Bath Eoad, a little to the west of 
Puthall Gate, Savernake Forest. P. aloides var. Dicksoni 

(Wallm.) — 7*. C. fr., sparingly in four places with P. nanum in 
the excavations near the London and Bath Eoad above referred to; 
Mr.W. E. Sherrin tells me he found this uncommon var. in Savernake 
Forest some years ago, and I think his locality is identical with 
mine. P. piliferum (Schreb.) 7, 8. — An extremely small 

tuft near Folly Farm, Great Bedwyn; c. fr. and very plentifully 
on banks in the old excavations for gravel to the south of the 
London and Bath Eoad, above referred to; this is a capital locality 
for Polytricha, no fewer than six kinds fruiting and flourishing 

here, viz., nanum, abides, and its var. Dicksoni, urnigerum, 
piliferum, and juniperinum, and I also noticed a tuft of 
formosum, which had probably escaped from an adjoining wood. 
P. piliferum seems scarce in this district; Mr. Knight informs 
me he generally finds it growing with the next species, P. juni- 
perinum (Willd.) 7, 8. Fairly plentiful and fruiting in the 
gravel excavation near Puthall Gate, above referred to ; sparingly 
near Folly Farm and at Dod's Down Brickworks. 

Archidium alternifolium (Schp.)— 7* 8*.— In some quantity 
with the hepatic Scapania curta on the ground in walks in 
Chisbury Wood; very sparingly on a walk in Bedwyn Brails 
Wood. Sterile in both localities; not uncommon in Savernake 
Forest, but I have not yet found fruit. 

Campylopus pyriformis (Brid.) : — 8. On tree stumps in a 
wood near Folly Farm and also on the edge of Wilton Brails Wood. 

Fissidens bryoides (Hedw.)— 7, 8. C, fr. On a bank in an 
old excavation for gravel near Bedwyn Common ;_ in a hed.ge.bank 
near Newton Shalbourne. 

Pottia bryoides (Mitt.) — 8*. C. fr. Sparingly on the ground 
by the roadside between Folly Farm and Bedwyn Brails -Wood- 
(teste Knight). 



By Cecil P. Hurst, 233 

Xortula mutica (Lind.) — 7, 8. On a sarsen stone near Tid- 
combe ; also by a pond in Tottenham Park. T\ laevipila 

var. laevipilaeformis (Limpr). — 8* With foliose gemmae on a tree 
at Tidcombe, and also fairly plentifully on shrubs and at the foot of 
trees in a hedgerow near the same village; Mr. Dixon noticed this 
var. on elder at Beckhampton, it seems not uncommon on trees in 
the South of England, often by water, and I have found it very 
plentifully near Burnham -on-Sea, in North Somerset, (6*), and have 
-also seen it in Berkshire (22*) and near Ilfracombe (4). 
T. papillosa (Wils). — 7. On stone by a lock on the Kennet and 
Avon Canal, near Froxfield ; Mr. Knight records this generally 
arboreal species from an old tombstone at Dumbleton, in Gloucester- 
shire, and I have seen it on a tiled roof at Shalbourne ; also on 
elder in Savernake Forest. 

Barbula ltirida (Lindb.) — 7*, 8*. On stone by the locks on 
the Kennet and Avon Canal, east and west of Great Bedwyn ; it 
occurs on both sides of the canal ; also on a sarsen stone at 
•Tidcombe. B. tophacea (Mitt.) — 8* Fruiting freely on 

the ground at Dod's Down Brickworks, a small form. B° 

sinuosa (Braithw.) — 8. — On a tree root and also on a sarsen stone 
at Tidcombe, 

Weisia viridula (Hedw,) 7, 8. C. fr. here and there in sandy 
places, as near Eight Walks and the Bath Boad, in Savernake 
Forest, near Chisbury, near East Grafton on Upper Greensand, etc. 

Orthotrichum anomalum var. saxatile (Milde)— 7, 8. 

On stone by locks on the Kennet and Avon Canal near Great 
Bedwyn, common and fruiting freely. O. cupulatum 

(Hoffm.) — 7, 8* C. fr, on stone by locks on both sides of the 
Kennet and Avon Canal east and west of Great Bedwyn. Mr. 
Knight mentions in the "Mosses of Gloucestershire " that this moss 
often grows on bridge walls and canal locks in that county; Mr. 
Ingham tells me this species was found in North Wiltshire by the 
late Dr. Parsons. 

Physcomitrium pyriforme (Brid.)— 8, C. fr, on damp ground 
by the Kennet and Avon Canal near Great Bedwyn. 



234 East Wiltshire Mosses, Hematics, and Zand Shells. 

Funaria fascicularis (Schp.)— 8, C. fr. on fallow ground in 
two localities near Great Bedwyn. 

Webera nutans (Hedw.) — 8. Various patches fruiting freely 
occur on London Clay at Dod's Down Brickworks ; it also grows in 
Tottenham Park and Chisbury Wood. W. annotina 

(Schwseg). — 7*, 8. On a gravel walk in the north-east of Savernake 
Forest, the non-gemmiparous form; the interesting form of this 
species recorded in my paper, " East Wiltshire Mosses," referred to 
above, produces capsules in some quantity, accompanied by fruiting 
Bryum pallens (Sw.), on damp sandy clay by water at Dod's 
Down ; the fruit in Webera annotina is rare and Mr. Knight 
mentions that it is always barren in Gloucestershire. Mr. Dixon 
wrote : — " The Webera annotina is very nice fruiting condition 
confirms my view that it belongs to type rather than to any of the 
vars." W. annotina var. erecta (Correns) — 7*. Plentifully in a 
valley near the Column, Savernake Forest, growing with Cera- 
todon purpureus. About this var., which the Census Catalogue 
only records for five vice-counties, Mr. Dixon writes: — "Your 
Webera is true var. erecta, I think. The leaves are wide, 
plane-margined, and decurrent. It is true the bulbils are rather 
small ; but that would sometimes be the case and probably also 
they are not quite fully formed — though they fall off easily." 

Bryum atropurpureum var, gracilentum (Tayl.)— 8* On 
bare ground near Folly Farm, with copious gemmae. 

Neckera pumila var. Philippeana (Milde) — 8*. On trees 
in Foxbury Wood, Great Bedwyn. 

Thuidium Philiberti (Limpr.)— 7, 8. This moss is rather 
frequent in open grassy spaces around Great Bedwyn, 

Bachythecium caespitosum (Dixon)— 8*. Plentifully at 
the base of four trees at Tidcombe. 

Eurynchium Swartzii (Hobk.) — 7, 8.C. fr. under trees near 
St. Katharine's Vicarage, Savernake, as well as in the Grand Avenue, 
near the boundary between Tottenham Park and Savernake Forest. 
I found this moss with capsules in a wet dripping hollow on the 



By Cecil P. Hurst. 235 

coast near Ilfracombe, and noticed that in the latter locality the 
capsules were rather long and arcuate, in fact resembling those oi 
E. Praelongum, of which, of course, E. Swartzii is a sub-species, 
while in the Savernake Forest localities they were much smaller 
and very short and turgid. Mr. Knight tells me he has noticed 
the same differences in the capsules in plants sent him from the 
Pembrokeshire coast aud those growing inland near Cheltenham. 

Plagiothecium silvaticum (3 & S.) — 7, 8. In woods and 
rather plentiful at the foot of shrubs in hedgerows near Great 
Bedwyn, fruiting (teste Dixon) sparingly in a wood near Froxfield 
and also in Savernake Forest. 

Hypnum aduncum (group) pseudo-fluitans var. paternum 
forma gracilis (Ken.) — 8. In masses in a pool near Folly Farm; 
this moss affects pools on London Clay in this district. H. 

fluitans var. gracile (Boul.) — 7*. Very plentifully in and 
around a small pool on peaty soil at about 500ft. in Chisbury 
Wood, Great Bedwyn. This is an interesting addition to the North 
Wiltshire moss-flora, in which calcareous vice-county ic cannot be 
a common plant, for H- fluitans generally avoids lime, and 
Mr. Knight, in the " Mosses of Gloucestershire " gives no record for 
East Gloucestershire (v.c. 33) and only one (the var. falcatum) 
for West Gloucestershire (v.c. 34). H. palustre (Huds.) — 

7, 8. This moss fruits freely by the side of the Kennet and Avon 
Canal near Great Bedwyn. 

The following species, which contain eight new vice-comital 
records, were noticed around Great Bedwyn in May, 1918 : — 

Sphagnum cymbifolium (Ehrh.) 8. In a small pool near 
Foxbury Wood, Great Bedwyn. Mr. Knight writes: — " The cell 
walls are not papillose, so it is not what I call S. papillosum ; 
but there is, I believe, a form of S. papillosum (var. laeve) 
with smooth cell walls and this I am unable to distinguish from 
S. cymbifolium." Dicranella Schreberi (Schp.) — 7*. 

Chisbury Wood, growing with Pleuridium subulatum {teste 
Knight). Leucobryum glaucum (Schp.)— 7. Bather 



236 East Wiltshire Mosses, Hematics, and Land Shells. 

sparingly in one place in Chisbury Wood ; also in Cobbam Frith 
Wood ; this species is very rare in calcareous districts, and in 
the " Mosses of Gloucestershire " Mr. Knight gives only one 
Gloucestershire locality east of the Severn, viz., that of Father 
Eeader's " sparingly at Woodchester." Encalypta strep- 

tocarpa (Hedw.) — 7. On a chalky bank near Kamsbury ; in 
the " Moss Flora of the Marlborough Greywethers " Mr, Dixon 
records this calcicolous species from the mortar of stone- 
work at Bowood Park. Philonotis caespitosa (Wils.) — 8. 
This rare species is now (end of May, 1918) producing male flowers 
freely in a bog on London Clay near Burridge Heath, Great Bedwyn, 
thecapsules have not been found in Britain; I sent a piece to Mr. J, A. 
Wheldon, who noticed Eurynchium piliferum in the tuft, which 
surprized him, for E. piliferum is common on the limestone of 
North Lancashire and very scarce in the southern sandstone district 
of that county, where it occurs on glacial drift which usually con- 
tains calcareous detritus, while P. caespitosa generally affects 
siliceous rocks; Mr. Wheldon tells me the distribution of the latter 
moss in Lancashire is very uncertain. Webera nutans 
(Hedw.)— 7*. On sandy soil in Chisbury Wood. W. anno- 
tina var. erecta (Correns) — 7. On paths in Chisbury Wood 
(teste Dixon), this locality is additional to the station in Savernake 
Forest recorded above ; the brown ovate gemmae in the axils of 
the upper leaves in this var. are so large that they push the leaves 
outwards. Bryum pseudo-triquetrum (Schwaeg.) — 8. 
This moss fruits sparingly in a small marsh near Webb's 
Gully Wood, Great Bedwyn B. erythrocarpum 
(Schwaeg.) — 7* 0. fr. in various places on sandy ground in 
Chisbury Wood, with radicular crimson translucent multi- 
cellar gemmae which extended sparingly along the lower 
part of the branches. B. atropurpureum (Web. & 
Mohr.) — 8*. C. fr. on sandy ground near Folly Farm (the type) ; 
Mr. Knight writes : — " B. atropurpureum is not common 
everywhere, I scarcely saw it in S. Wales"; and Mr. W. Watson, 



By Cecil P. Hurst. 237 

in the "Mosses of Somerset" refers to it as an "infrequent Bryuin," 
Mnium punctatum (L.)— 7*. Sandy ground ill Chisbury 
Wood. Hypnum riparium (!••) — 7.C. fr. by water in 

Chisbury Wood. H. chrysophyllum (Brid.) — 8. In various 

places in a clayey meadow immediately to the south of Great 
Bedwyn. H. aduncum group typicum var. falcatum 

(Schp:) — 8*. Very sparingly with the pievions species ; "char- 
acteristic var. falcatum," J. A. Wheldon. H. aduncum 
group Kneiffii var. intermedium (Schp.)— 8* Plentifully and 
very fine in a pool forming part of Wilton Water, Great Bedwyn ; 
I typical var. intermedium," J. A. Wheldon. H. fluitans 
group amphibium var. gracile (Boul.) — 7*. This moss 
paves the bottom of a small pool on peaty soil in Chisbury Wood 
and is very abundant but I could only find two capsules. 1 
H. Stramineum— 7*. A form with spreading distant leaves grew 
submerged very sparingly in one place in the Chisbury Wood pool 
with the previous species. Mr. Dixon writes : — "Your moss belongs 
to Hyp. stramineum. There is a var. patens (Lind.), which 
also has distant spreading leaves but it shows other characters which 
yours does not. It is possibly the var. tenueMilde MS. in Herb., 
which Limhricht includes in var. patens; but I am more inclined 
to consider it an aquatic form only of Hyp. stramineum." 
Philonotis calcarea var. laxa (Dismier)— 22*. (Berkshire). I 
have traced this interesting Wiltshire variety, which has lax 
areolation, and the nerve muricate at the back, into Berkshire 
where it grows by the side of the Kennet and Avon Canal at 
Hungerford. Philonotis caespitosa var. adpressa (Dismier.) 

1 With regard to the Chisbury Wood, Great Bedwyn (v. c. 7) moss 
recorded above as Hypnum fluitans var. gracile Boul., I have just 
received the following interesting communication from Mr. J. A. Wheldon, 
of Liverpool, the well-known authority on the Harpidioid Hypna : — "The 
moss is apparently a rather abnormal state of var gracile Boul. It is really 
too young (or badly developed owing to local conditions) to be a good 
example and shows a tendency to approach the var. Jeanbernati Ren. I think 
the very slender nerve and alar cells are, however, more characteristic of 
ivar. gracile, of which it may be looked upon as a depauperate state." 



238 East Wiltshire Mosses. Hepatics, and Zand Shells. 

— 8* Sparingly in three localities with the type in a bog near 
Burridge Heath, Great Bedwyn ; I noticed several male flowers. 
This var. is new to the British Isles, and it is curious that two 
vars. of Philonotis P. caespitosa var. adpressa (Dismier) 
and P. calcarea var. laxa (Dismier) should be almost confined to 
Great Bedwyn in East Wiltshire, so far as their distribution in the 
British Isles is at present known. Mr. W.Ingham kindly named my 
plants and wrote :— "Dismier is our greatest authority on Philono- 
tis, and has produced a monograph on the genus, of which he sent 
me a copy. He says that P. fontana, seriata, tomentella, 
and caespitosa, all produce similar varieties as adpressa, laxa, 
orthophylla, etc. His description of var. adpressa is as follows: — 
" Stems of 5 cm., little coherent, scarcely radiculose, slender, simple, 
without innovations; leaves dimorphous, some like the type, others 
distant, erect, strongly applied against the stem, widely oval, and 
shortly acuminate." P. caespitosa varies like other species, and 
I have the var. laxa, var. elongata, and var. orthophylla. 
Your var. adpressa is the first record for the British Isles, and 
I have now all its vars. except aristata- Dismier named 
adpressa i" 1908 ; it has long, very slender stems, without 
tomentum." Mr. Dixon writes : — " This parallelism in the forms 
or vars. of the different species of Philonotis is interesting — and 
similar to what occurs in Sphagnum." 

Hypnum aduncum group typicum var, intermedium 
forma penna (Sanio.) — 8*. In a pool on London Clay at Dod's 
Down, Great Bedwyn. Mr. Wheldon kindly writes : — " The 
' Harpie ' is not var, pungens, which has the apices quite different, 
the leaves being very closely appressed so as to have a julaceous 
appearance ; as a rule, also, it is a smaller plant than yours, its 
habit and general appearance being quite distinctive. Your plant is 
not distinguishable from one named 'for me by Eenauld, H. 
aduncum var. intermedium forma penna (Sanio), and I 
should have no hesitation in referring it to that. It occurs around 



By Cecil P, Hurst. 239 

here (Liverpool,) in pits from which clay for brickmaking has been 
taken, on the drift, sometimes associated with ordinary var. inter- 
medium, of which, of course, it is only a slight form, distinguished 
by its robust habit, yellowish colour, and short pinnately arranged 
branches, giving it somewhat the appearance of Hypnum 
CUSpidatum, except for the secund leaves." 



East Wiltshire Hepatics. 

The following hepatics were also gathered around Great Bedwyn 
in the winter and spring of 1917 — 18. Out of 281 recorded species 
the Census Catalogue of British Hepatics (1913) mentions only 11 
species for North Wiltshire and 18 species for South Wiltshire, 
the Wiltshire liverworts, like the mosses, having been much 
neglected. The comparative dryness of the county would probably 
militate against a long list of these damp-loving plants being 
produced. Miss E. Armitage, who is cataloguing the hepatics 
of the more western county of Hereford, tells me she is doubtful 
of obtaining so many as one hundred species in her list. The 
Census Catalogue Wiltshire records are due to Messrs. W. K. 
Sherrin and Mr. Watson, neither of whom live in the county. 
Messrs. H. H. Knight and W, Ingham have very kindly helped 
me with the following short list of twenty-one species (including 
sixteen new vice-comital records) in compiling which I have 
followed the nomenclature and arrangement of the Census Cata- 
logue. Conocephalum conicum(L.)(Dum,) — 8. Sparingly on 
a damp bank at Shalbourne. Lunularia cruciata (L,) (Duni.) 
— 7*, 8. Both sides of, the Kennet and Avon Canal near Great 
Bedwyn ; also in a garden in the village. Marchantia 

polymorpha (L.) 7* 8*. Both sides of the Kennet and Avon 
Canal near Great Bedwyn. Aneura pingttlS (L.) (Dimi.) 

— 8*. Very wet place near Folly Farm, with Bryum pseudo- 
triquetrum, Hypnum stellatum var. protensum, H. cuspi- 
datum, etc. 



240 East Wiltshire Mosses, Ilepatics, and Land Shells. 

MetZgeria furcata (L) (Dum)— 7, 8. Common on trees 
in Savernake Forest ; I noticed capsules near Tidcombe. 
Pellia epiphylla (L.) (Corda) — 8. Fruiting very freely on a sandy 
clay bank in a wood near Folly Farm: Mr. Knight tells me he 
very rarely sees this calcifugous species near Cheltenham and that 
when he finds it near that town it is generally on the sandy clay 
of the Middle lias beds. P. Fabbroniana (Raddi) — 7*, 8 

Very wet place in Savernake Forest near the Grand Avenue; also 
by a rivulet in Bed wyu Brails Wood ; a common plant. Blasia 
pUSllla (L.) — 8* Plentifully on damp sandy London Clay by water 
at Dod's Down Brickworks ; with the flask-shaped gemmiferous 
receptacles which are occasionally absent, especially in the North, 
Fossombronia sp. 7. On the ground in Chisbury Wood; 
the spores were absent, so it was impossible to determine the 
species. Haplozia crenalata (Sm.) (Dum)— 7, 8* On 

London Clay at Dod's Down Brickworks and also on banks in an 
excavation in Savernake Forest; very common in the district. 
LophoZia excisa (Dicks.) (Dum.) — 7*. On a gravelly bank in 
Savernake Forest near the Column (teste Knight). Plagiochila 
asplenioides (L.) (Dum.) — 7*, 8. Under trees in the Grand 
Avenue, Savernake Forest ; common in woods in both vice-counties. 
Lophocolea cuspidata (Limpr.) — 7. At the foot of trees 
near the Mansion, Tottenham Park. L. heterophylla (Schrad.) 
(Dum.) 7*. Savernake Forest and Chisbury Wood; a common 
species. Mr. Knight writes : — " All species of the genus 
Lophocolea have a characteristic" [musky] "scent by which 
you can easily recognize the genus." Chiloscyphus poly- 

anthus (L.) (Corda.) — 8. Very wet place in Bedwyn Brails 
Wood ; by a rivulet in Fox bury Wood ; bog near Burridge Heath. 
Calypogeia fissa (L.) (Raddi.)— 8* On a sandy clay bank near 
Folly Farm; also in Foxbury Wood, Great Bedwyn. 
Lepidozia reptans (L.) (Dum.) — 7. Creeping among the stems 
of Dkranum scoparium between the Grand Avenue and 
the Column, Savernake Forest. Ptilidium pulcherrimum 



By Cecil P. Hurst. 241 

(Web.) (Hampe.) — 8* In small quantity on a prostrate but still 
living stem of SallX cinerea in Foxbury Wood, Great Bedwyn, 
27th April, 1918. This rare and exceedingly pretty plant is an 
interesting addition to the Wiltshire Hepatic flora. The Census 
Catalogue records it for the following vice-counties : — 5 (South 
Somerset), 57 (Derby), 62 (North-East York), 64 (Mid-West 
York, 65 (North-West York), 78, 13—85, 88, 92, and 99, 
the last seven vice-counties being in Scotland ; to these 
records Mr. Ingham tells me to add 54 (North Lincoln). Mr. W. 
Watson, of Taunton, writes about the South Somerset station: — 
" Ptilidium pulcherrimum was found by me at Selworthy, near 
Porlock, was submitted to Mr. Ingham and agreed to by him. It was 
observed on 27th July, 1912, upon rock with Frullania tamarisch 
It is interesting to find it occurs in S. Wilts — -it was supposed to 
be a northern and more alpine plant, but this is probably a mistake." 
"Mr. A. Gepp tells me it also grows on an old oak in Epping 
Forest, South Essex, v.c. 18. Diplophyllum albicans 

(L.) (Dum.) — 7, 8*. A small form was abundant on loamy 
banks in Savernake Forest near the London and Bath Eoad ; 
rather sparingly on London Clay at Dod's Down Brickworks, 
the commonest of the hepatics. Scapania irrigua (Nees). 

(Dum.) — 7. Gravelly bank in Savernake Forest near the 
Column. S. curta (Mart.) (Dum.) — 7. With the previous 

species on a gravelly bank in Savernake Forest near the 
Column ; also with Archidium on a walk in Chisbury Wood, 
Radula complanata (L.) (Dum.) — 7*, 8. Bather common 
on shrubs in both vice-counties, fruiting not uncommonly. 
Madotheca platyphytia (L.) (Dum.) 7*, 8, Trees in 
Savernake Forest, a common species. Frullania dilatata 

(L.) (Dum.) 7, 8. Common on trees in both vice-counties. 

East Wiltshire Land Shells. 

The following shells were observed around Great Bedwyn, mostly 
in the spring of 1918; the localities are additional to those in my 

VOL XL. — NO. CXXI X. T 



242 East Wiltshire Mosses, Hematics, and Land Shells, 

paper " Marlborough Land and Freshwater Mollusca " ( Wilts Arch, 
Mag., xxxix., 465), and the arrangement and nomenclature of Mr, 
E.W,Swanton's "APoelcet Guide tothe British JN on- Marine Mollusca" 
have been followed. I should like to draw attention to an article 
by Mr. W. Denison Roebuck in the May (1918) number of the 
Journal of Conchology of great interest to Marlborough malacolo- 
gists ; it is entitled " Limax cinereoniger, its Variation in Savernake 
Forest, and Description of a New Variety," and emphasizes the 
excellence of Savernake Forest as a hunting ground for slugs. A 
conchologist makes up for the absence of stones and rocks in this 
chalky district by the careful examination of the under surface of 
any logs, sticks, or fallen branches that he may chance to come 
across and these often prove very prolific. I have to acknowledge 
much kind help from Mr. J. W. Taylor, of Leeds. The land shells, 
and also the flowering plants and lepidoptera of this district, show a 
well-marked tendency to albinism, possibly an attempt to adapt 
themselves to their white environments in this chalky country. 

Limax maximus (Linne.) Specimens of this slug from 

Wilton Brails Wood were placed by Mr. Taylor under vars. 

ferussacci (with spotted shield) and sylvatica (with blotched 

shield and longitudonal banding). L> cinereoniger var. 

stabilei. A specimen from Savernake Forest was so named by 

Mr. Taylor. Vitrina pellucida (Miiller). Rather common 

in the district. Vitrea aliiaria (Miller,) I have found this 

shell in many additional stations, including nearly all the surrounding 

woods ; it is common in the Great Bedwyn neighbourhood, but I 

always find it on clay or sand and never on the chalk, though Mr. 

Swanton records it from under chalk stones near Warminster. 

V. pura (Alder.) A few specimens in a wood near Folly Farm 

and several of the var. nitidosa (shell pale horn-colour) in Foxbury 

Wood and one near Hill Barn, Great Bedwyn ; not at all a common 

species. Shells of V- pura var. nitidosa are extremely like 

those of V* radiatula, but the latter species has the striae more 

strongly marked, the colour is deeper and the shell more glossy. 

V« radiatula (Alder). Particularly frequent in the northern 



By Cecil P, Hurst. 243 

partof Savernake Forest. Zonitoidesnitidus(Miiller). Several 
specimens by water at Great Bed wyi). Arion subfuscus (Drap- 
arnaud) . One specimen from Wilton Brails Wood ; a slug from Sav- 
ernake Forest was placed under the var. rufofusca of this species by 
Mr. Taylor. Arion hortensis (Ferussac.) I found an 

example of this slug adhering to a cat at Great Bedwyn. 
Punctual pygmaeum (Drap.) One shell under a log near East 
Grafton, the third example of this minute species that I have taken 
near Great Bedwyn, where it is apparently rare. Sphyradium 

edentulum (Drap.) A living shell in a wood near Folly Farm, 
and another in Fox bury Wood ; also rare near Great Bedwyn, 
where I have only seen four specimens. Helicella heripensis 

(H. gigaxii, Charpentier.) A good living example was found 
in March by the roadside near Folly Farm. H. catltiana 

(Montagu). In the month of March I noticed large numbers of 
immature H. catltiana on chalky banks on the north side of the 
Hungerford — Salisbury Road above Shalbourne ; in the current 
year (1918) H. cantiana should abound in this locality. 
Hygrottlia rufescens (Pennant). Abundant everywhere and 
a great pest in gardens, where it appears in swarms after every 
summer shower of rain ; the white var. alba is particularly plentiful 
near GreatBedwyn. I sent a specimen of the type with veryslightly 
dislocated whorls to Mr. Taylor and he wrote: — " The H. rufescens 
is only slightly scalarid so that it would scarcely be desirable to 
placeit under the name subscalariforme, though, of course,strictly 
speaking, even the least or almost imperceptible dislocation of the 
whorls could be so termed." Acanthhiula aculeata (Miiller). 
A living specimen in Foxbury Wood. Vallonia costata 

(Miiller). A shell under a piece of wood near Burnt Mill Lock, on 
the Kennet and Avon Canal near Great Bedwyn. V* excentrica 
(Sterki.) About twenty living specimens under logs near Hill 
Barn, Great Bedwyn, 6th May, 1918; a living shell under a log 
near Folly Farm, a little over a mile from Great Bedwyn, 

T 2 



244 East Wiltshire Mosses, Hematics, and Land Shells, 

Helicigona arbustorum (Linne.) In a liedgebank at Wexcombe, 
in fair numbers; a new locality for this local species; also in a 
liedgebank in Great Bedwyn village; several specimens of the var. 
conica (teste J. W.Taylor) occurred in a hedgebank nearStypeWood, 
Bagshot. 

Helix nemoralis (Linne.) Apparently very scarce near 
Great Bedwyn ; I found two living shells in Fox bury Wood (one var. 
rubella 00300 and the other var. olivacea 00000) and about a 
living specimen that occurred at Tidcombe Mr. Taylor wrote: — "The 
shell is var. rubella. It is not var. minor, which should not 
exceed 16mm. in diam. The specimen really also inclines to 
the shade of sub-var. rosea/' H. hortensis. In great 

beauty and abundance in hedgebanks around Great Bedwyn and 
showing very great variability as to colour and banding ; var. lutea 
is common while var. arenicola is not unfrequently met with, 
and a specimen of var. conica occurred in a hedge. Shells with 
bluish bands were named var. violaceoZonata by Mr. Taylor, and 
this var. seems not infrequent. By a roadside less than a mile from 
the village, var. Sauveuri, which has a beautiful violet peristome, 
is quite common and Mr. Taylor wrote about a shell I sent him: — 
"The specimen you send is really the Helix Sauveuri and the 
colouring is that of var. incarnata — the yellowish transverse aper- 
tural area is a feature common to several of the colour varieties and 
has not hitherto been used as a separating character. H. Sau- 
veuri was described as a distinct species, intermediate between H. 
nemoralis and H. hortensis, but is correctly a var. of the latter 
shell." After a heavy thunderstorm on 26th April, 1918, I took 
sixteen examples of var. Sauveuri in the above locality, which 
was then swanningwith H. hortensis, andsent them toMr.Taylor, 
who wrote: — "The shells may all be broadly referred to Helix 
Sauveuri ; the colouring varies in the body of the shell and has had 

various names applied, var. incarnata, var, fagorum,var. carnea, 
etc., applying to the different shades shown." After slight rain on 1st 
May, 1918, I got ten examples of var. Sauveuri in the same 



By Cecil P. Hurst. 245 

place. Ena montana (Drap.) In a plantation on the 

chalk escarpment near the hamlet of Bivar, Shalbourne; dead 
shells were nob uncommon but living ones were rather rare. By 
the old county boundaries, which were very sinuous, jagged, and 
irregular, this locality is just in Berkshire, but by the new 
boundariesit is about two and half-miles within Wiltshire. This shell 
also occurs in the hanging woods, Eivar Copse, and Little Rivar 
Copse, on the same chalk escarpment a lew miles to the eastwards; 
a very small portion of Eivar Copse is in Wiltshire, the remainder 
and Little Rivar Copse being in Berkshire. This escarpment isformed 
by the great upfold in the chalk known to geologists as the Kings- 
clere — Pewsey anticline and is one of the main watersheds of the 
South of England, the streams on its southern slope flowing into the 
English Channel and those on its northern inclination into theThames, 
and so into the North Sea. Living Ena montana is also scarce and 
difficult to find in Rivar Copse and Little Bivar Copse, while dead 
shells are not uncommon, so that in the hanging woods on this anti- 
clinal axis the species would appear to have a tendency to die out. 

E. obscttra (Miiller), Generally distributed around Great 
Bedwyn but not very common. Vertigo antivertigo (Drap.) 

One dead shell near Folly Farm. Balea perversa (Linne,). A 

few specimens on a tree after rain near Tidcombe, Clausilia 

laminata (Montagu). Plentiful in Foxbury Wood ; I noticed this 
species ascending the trees in Foxbury Wood in May. C. 

bidentata (Strom.) Very common around Great Bedwyn ; a 
specimen which appeared to come under var. tumidula occurred 
near Folly Farm. C Rolphii (Leach in Turton.) On 12th 

April, 1918, I took fourteen specimens of this rare shell in a hedge- 
bank near Crofton, Great Bedwyn, and could have easily gone on 
collecting; a week or so previously I had found about a dozen 
specimens in the same locality; on 27th April, 1918, in Foxbury 
Wood I saw eight C Rolphii and five Azeca tridens, the latter 
also a rare Wiltshire species. I have noticed C> Rolphii in four 
localities in this district, in one of the stations it is abundant and 



246 East Wiltshire Mosses, Hpatics, and Land Shells. 

in two of the others it is common ; in Foxbury Wood I found 
C Rolphii^ C. bidentata, and C. laminata under the same 
fallen branch. Carychium minimum (Miiller). This tiny 

shell is very common in damp places and at Dod's Down Brickworks 
by water I noticed nine specimens adhering to a piece of hark two 
or three inches in length ; though so plentiful in wet places and in 
damp weather, it, like nearly all our land shells, is at once conspicu- 
ous by its absence when a period of dryness sets in. Limnaea 
glabra (Miiller). Living examples of this amphibious species 
occurred fairly plentifully in a marsh near Stype Wood, Bagshot; 
by the old county boundaries the locality was just in Berkshire 
but by the new ones it is in Wiltshire. "The inclusion of this — 
the rarest British representative of the genus — in the Wiltshire 
list rests upon half-a-dozen specimens in the Townsend Collection 
labelled ' Great Bedwyn/ probably collected in the year 1850, and 
upon Jeffreys' record {British Conchology, I., 118)," Mr. E. W. 
Swanton's " The Mollusca of Wiltshire" (Joum. of Conch. , vol. 12, 
No. 6, April, 1908). I may mention that the Great Bedwyn shells 
were studied in the ''fifties" of the last century by Mr. F. N, 
Townsend, the well-known critical botanist, and that the valuable 
little collection of land and freshwater mollusca containing thirty- 
two species that he made there was presented by his widow to the 
Educational Museum at Haslemere, Surrey. 

Common land shells around Great Bedwyn, to be easily found 
in a morning's walk, are :— Clausilia bidentata. Helix aspersa, 
H. hortensis, Pyramidula rotundata, Hygromia rufescens, 
Carychium minimum, Euconulus fulvus, Vitrea alliaria, 
V. nitidula, V. cellaria, and V. crystallina. 

Mr. Charles Oldham, of Berkhampstead (Herts), the Treasurer 
of the Conchological Society, paid two very short visits to Wiltshire 
in August and October of 1917. He tells me he unsuccessfully 
searched Savernake Forest and also the beech woods at Eoundway 
Down, Devizes,and at Erlestoke for Limax tenellus; in Savernake 
Forest, however, he found some very interesting forms of Limax 
maximus and L- cinereoniger, and at Devizes he saw 



By Cecil P. Hurst. 247 

Helicella heripensis, Jaminia secale, Vertigo pygmaea and 
Clausilia laminata, and at Erlestoke Ena montana, Jaminia 

cylindracea (an uncommon shell in Wiltshire) and some very 
fine Helicigona lapicida. The Canal at Devizes yielded 
Planorbis corneas, Dreissensia polymorpha and Pisidium 

Henslowianum and that ab Seend, near Melksham, Bithynia 
Leachil and Pisidium parvulum ; the last species is particu- 
larly interesting, for it has only been known as British since 1916. 
Mr. Oldham noted that the freshwater mussels, Unio pictorum 
and U, tumidus were plentiful in the Canal at Seend and also 
near Wootton Rivers, Marlborough. 

Mr. J. W.Taylor, of Leeds, very kindly sent the following notes 
on shells from Great Bedwyn : — Euconulus fulvUS var. alderi 
(Gray). A specimen occurred by water on the south side of the 
Ken net and Avon Canal near Great Bedwyn ; Mr. Taylor wrote : — 
" The Euconulus was var. alderi though not characteristic, it 
lacked the dark colouring, and I was unfortunately not able to 
verify the basal spiral lineation which should be present; it was 
nob mature and would be not quite so depressed when fully grown." 

Helix aspersa var. grisea. Mr. Taylor sent me the following 
note on a specimen I obtained in a hedge close to Great Bedwyn 
after rain: — "The shell you send is not var. insolida, which is 
quite uniformly and clearly coloured with the oblique striatum 
deep and distinct; your specimen is referable to var. grisea, a form 
linking the type with var. exalbida." 

H. hortensis (Miiller.) I sent Mr. Taylor over one hundred 
specimens of this species which I found in a hedgebank in Great 
Bedwyn, in Brook Street, a little to the south of the Kennet 
and Avon Canal, and he kindly wrote : — "The shells you 
sent may be broadly arranged in their colouration into three 
groups, yellow, red and brown, which can again be variously 
sub-divided. The yellow group contains the largest number, 
but there are only three unicolorous examples which are, 
though not very characteristic, representatives of lutea, 



248 East Wiltshire Mosses, Hematics, and Land Shells. 

flavovirens, and lutescens. In the banded series there is a 
great variety of banding embracing 10005, 10045, 100 4 5, 10345, 
12345, (12)3(45), (123)(45), (12345), and in the living shell which 
shows IO445, the fourth band is split and the upper one of the pair 
does not represent the third band in normal shells, These all 
belong to the dark-banded group, while the rufozonate specimens 
show 12345, (123)(45) and (12)345. The yellow group also includes 
one specimen of the var. arenicola with formula 12345, the 
discoverer of this var. confused the bands with the ground colour, 
as is frequently done even now. There is one specimen which may 
be included under violaceoZonata with a formula (123) x (45). 
The reddish specimens include the vars. incarnata, colorata, 
and fagorutn, the name fagorutll was applied by Dr. Weinland 
to this form from a real or fancied resemblance to the colour of 
fallen beech leaves, and assumed to be of some protective value ; 
some of these show faint banding 12345, 12300, and it is usually 
the case that banded shells have generally a paler ground colour 
than individuals of uniform colour which are bandiess and its effect 
is more marked according to the degree of pigmentation of the bands. 
The var. roseo-hepatica includes the ruddier forms of the var. 
olivacea and the two dark shells belong to this, and mosc of the 
brownish ones, the paler and less ruddy or greyer forms may be 
regarded as the var. griseo-brunnea of Esmark. Some of these 
paler forms show traces of banding — 12345 and 02345 being noticed. 
Some of the banded forms enumerated in the foregoing parts of 
this note have received definite names, which have been given 
chiefly by the French conchologists, though other nations have 
contributed to some extent in extending the list. Thus 10045 if 
on a shell with yellow ground colour is var, terveria (Locard), 
if 10005 it is var. michaudia (Locard) ; the formula (12345) is 
known as vat, bottchardia (Moquin — Tandon), and so on. 
There are also several subvarieties of the var. bicolor of Picard, 
which is based on the basal ground colouring being perceptibly 
darker than the paler and often different shade of colour of the 
upper surface." 



By Cecil P. Hurst, 249 

Limnaea peregra var. conglobata (Loc. and Bourg). 
Plentiful in a bog on London clay near Burridge Heath, Great 
Bedwyn ; Mr. Taylor wrote : — " The shells you send may 
perhaps be most correctly referred to var. conglobata ; they 
are rather interesting specimens," and on 19th June, 1918, he 
wrote : — I have as yet had no access to the description of var. 
conglobata (Loc. and Bourg.), but at present am guided solely 
by the figures published by Prof. Germain, of the National 
Museum of France, and by Comm. Caziot, of Nice. 

"In English books all species are treated in a very slight and 
perfunctory manner, so it is not a matter of surprize that you find 
no mention of this variety. 

" There are hundreds of named forms of L peregra which have 
been regarded as varieties or as distinct species by their various 
authors and there is great need for bringing them into some 
degree of concordance so that their numbers can be largely reduced, 

" Some years ago I published a short dissertation on variation in 
this species, enumerating twenty or more varieties and figuring 
many of them, but this was comparatively a slight sketch of what 
is really necessary." 



250 



THE SIXTY-FIFTH GENERAL MEETING 

OF 

THE WILTSHIRE ARCHAEOLOGICAL AND NATURAL 

HISTORY SOCIETY, 

HELD AT DEVIZES MUSEUM, October 21st, 1918. 

For the fourth year in succession the Annual General Meeting of the 
Society was held at Devizes for business only, in consequence of the War. 
The President, Mr. W. Heward Bell, F.S.A., F.G.S., was in the chair; only 
a few other members were present. The report was read by the Hon. 
Secretary, and accepted, and the officers of the Society were re-elected en bloc. 
Beyond the repairs of the Museum the only other important business on 
the agenda was the question of the return to Luckington Church of three 
headstones of a very curious type, and a corbel, which were found during 
the restoration of the Church in 1872 and were then placed in the Museum 
The patron of the living, Lt.-Col. Ottley, had asked that they might be 
returned to the Church, where he promised that every care would now be 
taken of them. The consent of a General Meeting being necessary, the 
matter was placed on the agenda. It was unanimously agreed that the 
proper home for the stones was the Church from which they came, and that 
they should be returned, on condition of their careful preservation there for 
the time to come. 

THE REPORT. 

The following is the text of the annual report read by the Hon. Secretary : 
Members — For the first time since the beginning of the war the diminution 
in numbers has been arrested and the year which began with a membership 
of 313 ends with a total of 321, of whom 11 are life members and 310 annual 
subscribers. There have been 8 deaths (1 of them a life member), and 14 
resignations during the year, whilst 30 new members have been elected, a 
gain of 8 on the year. 

Finance. — The Society's accounts published in the June number of the 
Magazine show a balance on the General Account, on January 1st, 1917, of 
£64 13s. 6|d, and on December 31st, a balance of £40 9s. 2jc?._ The Museum 
Maintenance Fund, beginning the year with a balance of £7 4s. 10d, ended 
it with one of £20 3s. Qd. During the year £10 was repaid from this fund 
to the General Fund on account of the sum of £56 borrowed some years 
ago from that fund for the repair of the Museum roof, and the other repairs 
of the Museum this year accounted for £7 lis. 2c?. The amount received 
by the Museum Maintenance Fund in subscriptions was £27 16s. 6d., whilst 
£4 16s. 4d. came from the box at the Museum. The number of subscribers 
to this fund has been gradually falling off, from the death or resignation of 



The Sixty -Fifth General Meeting. 251 

old members, and it is very desirable that fresh subscribers of 5s. a year or 
upwards should come forward from among the newer members of the Society 
to take their places and keep up the level of the fund, which is of vital 
moment for the welfare of the Museum. The Museum Enlargement Fund, 
which began the year with a balance of £2 Os. 9<i., ended with.one of £15 ls.4cZ- 
This is 'derived ^from the rent of the caretaker's house. The Museum 
Purchase Fund, which is intended to be available in the future for the 
purchase of Wiltshire objects for the Museum, showed a balance at the 
beginning of the year of £20 10s. lid., which at the end of the year had 
increased to £72 0s. 9d. This has been invested in the War Savings 
Association. This increase arose from the proceeds of the sale by the 
Committee, as authorised by the general meeting of the Society, of various 
non- Wiltshire objects, fossils, etc., as described in the report for the year 
1916-17. Adding the whole of the Society's funds together the united 
balance which stood on January 1st, 1917, at £153 17s. Q^d., had grown on 
December 31st to -£203 4s. 8jcZ., an increase on the year of £49 7s. 8c/., 
which must be considered as satisfactory, though the increase arises almost 
wholly from the sale of non- Wiltshire objects from the Museum. 

Museum and Library. — The notable acquisitions during the past year 
have been all on the Library side. Of these the great Buckler collection of 
690 water colour drawings of Wiltshire Churches and houses, bought by our 
President, Mr. W. Heward Bell, F.G.S., F.S.A., in 1916, in order that the 
Society might have the chance" of securing them later on, was offered by 
him to the Committee at the same price. An appeal was therefore issued 
early in 1918, and within three months the sum of £378 8s., including 
specially handsome donations from Mr. E. S. Wills, Mr. W. Heward Bell 
himself, and Mr. W. J. E. Warry Stone, was paid in, thus enabling the 
purchase to be carried out, and a detailed catalogue of the drawings to be 
printed in the June Magazine, where also a list of subscribers and>full details 
of the most important addition made to the Library since its foundation 
will be found. The balance of the fund, after paying the expenses of the 
appeal and making a grant towards the printing of the catalogue, was added 
to the Museum Purchase Fund. The same number of the Magazine gives 
an account of the purchase, through the kindness and generosity of Mr. 
John Moulton, of The Hall, Bradford-on-Avon, of a very large number of 
Wiltshire deeds and documents, part of which have already reached the 
Museum, whilst a further consignment is promised by Mr. Moulton in the 
near future. In connection with the arduous work of sorting and arranging 
these deeds the Society also owes its thanks to Canon Knubley, Canon 
Manley, the Rev. A. W. Stote, and the Rev. C. W. Shickle, of Bath. Mr. 
A. S. Maskelyne, of the Record Office, who has for many years been engaged 
on the great work of arranging, cataloguing, and editing the very large 
collection of Wiltshire deeds already owned by the Society, has been obliged, 
in consequence of the position created by the air raids in London, to return 
the whole of the deeds to the Museum. The great mass of documents now 
owned by the Society contains a vast amount of material for the topo- 
graphical and genealogical history of the county, but in order that it may 
be rendered available for reference in the future the heavy work of the 



252 The Sixty -Fifth General Meeting. 

completion of Mr. Maskelyne's catalogue— already carried a considerable 
distance — will have to be undertaken. The mere storage, too, of the docu- 
ments in the present congested state of the Library presents considerable 
difficulties, and brings the need of more space for the Library's expansion 
forcibly before the Committee. Other gifts to the Library have been a 
complete set of " The Ancestor," by Mr. A. Schomberg, and several volumes 
of standard works on Natural History by the Rev. E. H. Goddard. 

Publications. Two numbers of the Magazine have been published during 
the year, and the Society is indebted to Mrs. B. H. Cunnington and Mrs. 
Story-Maskelyne for donations towards the cost of illustrations. The 
expense of printing the Magazine is constantly increasing, and there is no 
more useful way of helping the Society than by contributions on the part 
of authors towards the expense of printing or illustrating their papers. 
The Committee hope to be able to continue the issue of two numbers of 
the Magazine each year— but the number of pages in each number will 
certainly have to be cut down to meet the expense. 

The Bradford Barn. — The Barn is now open to visitors at a charge of 3c?. 
a head. The fees brought in £5 5s. lOd. during the year, and the balance 
on the fund at the end of the year amounted to £8 12s. 9d. 



253 



THE CHUKCH SURVEY IN WILTS, 1649—50. 
[Parliamentary Surveys (Lambeth), Vol. XIV., &c] 

Communicated by the Ven. Archdeacon E. J. Bodington. 

The manuscripts here transcribed were shown to me last autumn at the 
Library of Lambeth Palace by the Librarian, the Rev. Claude Jenkins, now 
Professor of Ecclesiastical History at King's College ; and to his kind interest 
and help I owe this opportunity of making them public. Our thanks are 
due to His Grace the Archbishop of Canterbury for allowing them to be 
be published. And I should like to add my own to Miss E. M. Thompson 
for her scholarly transcription. We hope to carry on the work to the extent 
indicated by Canon Manley in his interesting introductory note. 

E. J. Bodington. 

In the transcripts given below will be found details with regard to our 
Wiltshire parishes of great interest, difficult to be obtained elsewhere. The 
originals form part of the mass of documents in the Library at Lambeth 
Palace, which have to do with the management of ecclesiastical affairs 
during the great Rebellion and the Commonwealth. 

Those printed here may be divided into two classes : (i.) Parochial Surveys, 
(ii.) Valuations of Cathedral and other Church property. 
i. The Parochial Surveys were carried out as a result of an ordinance for 
maintenance of ministers passed by the Parliament 16th June, 1649. 
The Commissioners of,the Great Seal were directed to issue commissions 
into every county for an inquisition into the yearly value of all parson- 
ages and vicarages presentative and of other spiritual and ecclesiastical 
benefices and livings with cure of souls attached. The commissioners 
thus appointed proceeded by the method of jury to obtain the informa- 
tion required. The returns vary to some extent, being much fuller in 
some cases than in others, but as a rule include the yearly value of the 
living, the name of the incumbent or person supplying the cure, with 
generally some judgment upon his qualifications, the name of the patron, 
the chapels, if any, attached to the parish Church, together with sug- 
gestions for the grouping of parishes or readjustment of their borders. 
The extant Surveys for Wilts cover only the Hundreds of (i.) Ames- 
bury, (ii.) Elstub and Everley, (iii.) Downton, (iv.) Cawden and 
Cadworth, (v.) Chalke, (vi.) Branche and Dole, (vii.) Alderbury, (viii.) 
Frustfield, (ix.) Underditch, (x.) Chippenham, (xi.) Malmesbury, (xii.) 
Calne, (xiii.) North Damerham. The returns from the first nine were 
presented to the commissioners sitting at New Sarum on 27th, 25th, 
18th, 22nd, and 15th June, 1650 : the last four were handed in to the 
Commissioners on 1 6th September, 1650. When duly certified as correct 
they were returned into Chancery. We must presume that inquisitions 
were carried out for all the Hundreds of Wiltshire, but that some half 
of the number have disappeared. 



254 The Church Survey in Wilts, 1649 — -50. 

ii. The Valuations of Cathedral and other Church property were made 

under two Acts,one passed on the 1 6th N ov. ,1646, for the sale of Bishops' 

lands, the other passed 13th Feb., 1648 — 9, for the sale of iJean and 

Chapter lands, both for the use of the State. The proceeds of such 

sales were apparently intended to form a fund for the ministry. These 

sales could not be carried out until proper valuations had been made. 

Those which we possess show that they were made purely for business 

purposes, no report being required in them upon the minister or his 

qualifications or general Church matters. The work was put into the 

hands of the regular surveyors in the service of the Parliament and 

carefully checked at headquarters. 

The Parochial Surveys for Wilts are all of date 1650 and are to be found 

in Vol. XIV. of Lambeth MSS. 902 — 22, in the same order as printed below. 

The valuations are scattered about in different volumes of this series and 

vary in date from 1646 to 1649 ; they are printed in this article immediately 

after the Parochial (Survey of the Hundred in which the parish lies, when 

this exists, and the remainder will be placed in a batch at the end. 

In the Record Office may be found some other Parochial Surveys, in- 
cluding three for Wilts [Surveys of Church Livings, Commonwealth, Vol. iii.] 
These are the original returns of the Commissioners, on parchment, with 
their seals and signatures attached, while those at Lambeth are only certified 
copies on paper. They are in bad condition and in many places illegible. 
One of the three is for 1650, being the same as that at Lambeth for the 
Hundreds of Downton, Cawdon k Cadworth, and Chalke. The other two 
are of date 1656, and are inquisitions taken " By Virtue of a Commission 
©f His Highness Oliver, Lord Protector," &c, one at Marlborough for the 
" Hundred of Highworth, Cricklade & Stapleford, Kingsbridge, Ramsbury, 
Selkley & the Borough & Town of Marlborough," the other at Devizes for 
the "Hundreds of Pottern & Cannyns, Bradford, Melksham & Swanborough." 
They are of the same character as the 1650 Surveys, with very definite 
statements about the incumbent. 

In the British Museum is a manuscript (Lansdowne MS. 459), a transcript 
of which, unfortunately somewhat inaccurate, is printed in an earlier volume 
of this Magazine (xix., pp. 182—216). This contains in tabular and abbre- 
viated form the information contained in the Surveys now being printed, 
omitting the suggestions as to re-arrangement of parishes. So far as Wilts 
is concerned it contains no additional information except that in the Hun- 
dreds of Chippenham, Malmesbury, Calne and North Damerham the names 
of the patrons have been added, which, strangely enough, are not given in 
the Surveys for those Hundreds, and the Christian names of the incumbents 
also are inserted. This manuscript is undated but the information in it is 
simply that contained in the 1650 Surveys and it was evidently put into 
this shape for convenience of use by the Parliamentary Committees. That 
it is not an independent document is shown by the fact that it covers exactly 
the same Hundreds in Wilts as those in the Lambeth Survey and the 
wording of its entries as to the clergy, &c, is generally identical with that 
return. 

The question arises what became of the returns for the other Hundreds 
in Wilts 1 If the Lansdowne MS. 459 was compiled, as apparently it was 



Communicated by the Ven. Archdeacon E, J. Bodington. 255 

soon after 1650 how could these returns duly made to the Commissioners 
have disappeared so quickly, and if they were then in existence how is it 
that the Lansdowne MS. does not include them 1 Yet it seems improbable 
that the work of the Commissioners could only have been partially carried 
out. If, however, this was the case the Record Office Surveys of 1656 show 
that the Protector was anxious to complete the work begun in 1650, but 
unfortunately here again we have no returns extant for some of theHundreds. 

F. H. Manley. 
[The Society is indebted to the Archdeacon of Wilts for the entire cost of 
the transcription of these Surveys made by Miss E. M. Thompson. They 
are printed in full, except that the statement of the authority under which 
the Inquisitions were held, which occurs continually, is not here repeated, 
and that in consequence of the urgent necessity of curtailing space no attempt 
is made to preserve the lines of the original MS. in the letterpress. — Ed„] 

I, Parochial Surveys. 

Wiltes.' 2 An Inquisition indented taken att the Cittie of New Sarum 
in the Countie of Wilts the seaven and twentieth day of June in the yeare 
of our Lord God one thousand sixe hundred and Fiftie. Before Francis 
Dore Gentleman, Maior of the said Cittie of Newe Sarum James Abbott 
gentleman Edward Mannings gentleman Anthony Trotman gentleman and 
Bennett Swaine gentleman By vertue of a commision to them & others 
directed for the Inquirie of the Vallues of Churches Chappells Rectories 
Parsonages Viccaridges and divers other things in the said Commission men- 
cioned within the said Countie of Wiltes vpon the oathes of John Woodward 
gent, George Duke gent, Henry Mundie, William Pitman, John Smart, Robert 
Beaumonte, John Walker,'Stephen Browne, John Thomas Shephard, Thomas 
Cooper, George Garvis, John Cunditt, John Maton, Leonard Mundy, William 
Dike, Richard Harrison, William Mundy e, Thomas Lawes, William Weeks, 
James Pratewe, John Lawes, Francis Gale, William Blake and Henry Snell, 
good and lawfull men of the Hundred of Amesburie in the said Countie, who 
present vpon theire oathes as followeth vizt. 

AMESBURY HUNDRED 
Sarum Division. 
Okeingham and Hurste Imprimis wee present that there is in Oke- 
ingham a Parsonage appropriated to the late Deane and Chapter of Sarum 
held in lease by Mr. Henrie Barker of the valine of one hundred and sixetie 
poundes per annum. The old Rent to the Trustees is twentie sixe poundes 
thirteen shillinges and fower pence per annum. The Lessee provides the 
curate, Mr. John Bateman supplies the cure preacheth twice everie Lordes 
daye and hath for his Sallerie out of the Parsonage seaventie poundes per 
annum ; parte of his Parishe lies in Berkshire and is convenient still to lie 
to the same Parishe. Witnesses John Ellis, William Nuttein 

1 Lambeth Pari. Surveys Vol. XIV., pp. 306, seq. 
2 Noted in another hand at the top : — " Liberatum fuit curie xiij die 
Novembris 1650." 



256 The Church Survey in Wilts, 1649—60. 

Hurste And for the parishe of Hurste the Church thereof and moste 
parte of the Parishe is in Berks. And about the fifth part of the Parishe 
onely lies in Wiltes. And that the parsonage is appropriated to the Deane 
and Chapter of Sarum as Okingham is. And therefore wee leave the in- 
quirie of the value and other particulars to the Inquirie of the Com- 
missioners of Berks 

Swallowfield Item wee present that Swallowfield is neare about halfe 
belonging to Wiltes and the other halfe lyinge in Berks. The whole be- 
longeing to the Chappell of Swallowfeild in the Parish of Sinkfield 1 , in the 
said County of Berks. The tythes of that part lying in Wiltes are ap-. 
propriated vnto the Church of Hereford held in lease by [ ] 2 

and are of the value of Thirty poundes per annum. And] its thought 
convenient that the Inhabitants of Swallowfield as well those of Wiltes 
as of Berks be made a parishe of it selfe. The privy Tithes alsoe of that 
parte in Wiltes are of the value of eight poundes per annum. And for the 
further knowledge of the particulers of this parishe wee referre to the in- 
quirie of the Commissioners of Berkshire. Witnesses Edward Beadle. 
Thomas Fulcor. John Feltham. 

Durington Item wee present that there is in Durington a Parsonage 
appropriated to the Dean and Chapter of Veinton 3 (sic) held in lease by Mr. 
William Kent and is of the value of Two hundred and Twentie pounds per 
annum. The old rent to the Trustees is Twentie poundes per annum The 
Lessee was to dischardge the Cure. Mr. Leonard Maton is the present 
Incumbent who supplies the Cure and preacheth constantlie once every 
Lords day. And hath for his sallery Twenty poundes per annum with a 
sacke of wheate and a sacke of barley yearely. And further its thought fitt 
that the Hamlet of Knighton be vnited to Durington and soe become parte 
of that congregacion. Witnesses : Thomas Smyth. John Mundie. 

Brigmiston and Milson Item wee present that there is a Parsonage 
presentative inlthe guifte of the heires of Sr Lawrence Hyde which with the 
Gleabe is of the vallue of One Hundred poundes per annum. Its a seques- 
tracion from Mr Richard Hyde. Mr. John Smyth ia the present Incumbent 
supplies the Cure and preacheth Twice every Lords day and receiveth the 
profitts. There is a porcion of Tythes and Gleabe impropriate of the value 
of Five and Thirty poundes per annum The Fee thereof is in the heires 
of Sr Lawrence Hyde and held now in lease by John Munday. Witnesses : 
Thomas Lawes. Thomas Haydon. Leonard Mundy. John Lawes. 

North Tydworth Item wee present that there in North Tydworth 
a parsonage presentative in the guifte of the State of the value of one 
hundred and fifteene poundes per annum Mr. John Graile is the present 
Incumbent supplies the Cure and preacheth Twise every Lords Day and 
receiveth the profittes. There are a porcion alsoe of Tythes appropriated 

1 Shinfield. 2 Blank in original. 

3 The Parsonage was appropriated (and is now) to Dean and Chapter 
of Winchester. 



Communicated by the Ven. Archdeacon E % J. Bodington. 257 

to the Deane and Chapter of Winton held in Lease by Mr John Mompesson 
of the value of Twentie poundes per annum out of which he paies old rent 
to the Trustees Three pounds per annum. Its thought convenient that the 
parishe of South Tydworth in the Countie of Southampton bee vnited to 
North Tydworth in Wiltes to make one Parishe and to be that congregacion. 
North Tydworth to be the Church and made convenient for the In- 
habitantes. This is to bee referred to the consideracion of theCommissioners 
of Southampton. Witnesses — John Mompesson. John Stout. 

Ludgershall and Biddesdene. Item wee present that there is a 
Parsonage presentative in the guifte formerly of Mr. Browne Recusant nowe 
it the guifte of the State of the value of one hundred pounds per annum. 
Its a sequestracion from Doctor Andrew Read. Mr Henry Cusse is present 
Incumbent supplies the Cure preacheth Twise every Lords day and receiveth 
the profittes. Crawlboyes Farme is allreadie annexed to Ludgershall as 
appeares in Elstubbe and Everly Hundred {vide Collingborne Parishe) And 
that the Widdowe Veales house in Biddesdeane being of the County of 
Southampton and above Three Myles from Thruckstontheire Parishe Church 
be vnited to Ludgershall to be of that Congregacion beinge but a Myle. 
And that this alsoe bee referred to the consideracion of the Commissioners 
of Southampton. Witnesses : — Mr. Henry Cusse. Henry Joles and Edward 
Florie. 

Kingston Deverill. Item wee present that there is a Parsonage pre- 
sentative in the guifte of the heires of Mr. Henry Ludlowe which with 
gleabe is of the value of one hundred and fortie poundsiper annum Master 
Eburne is the present Incumbent supplies the Cure, preacheth 
Twice every Lords day and receiveth the profittes. It was sequestred 
from Mr. Aylesbury. Its thought convenient that Kingston Deverell 
Mounckton Deverell and Brickston Deverell be vnited and made one congre- 
gacion. The Church thereof to be Mounckton Deverell and made con- 
venient to receive the congregacion. And that the value and the other 
particulers of Brickston and Mounckton being in Warminster Division be 
referred to the inquirie of the Commissioners of Warminster division 
Witnesses : — William Harle. Andrewe Liversige. 

West Wellewe Item wee present that West Wellewe consists of a 
Parsonage and a viccaridge both lying in Hamshire which wee referre to 
the Inquirie of those Commissioners. The portion of Tythes of that parte 
of the Parishe in Wiltes that parte of it that belongs to the impropriate 
Parsonage is of the value of Fifteene poundes per annum and that parte 
that is to the Viccaridge is of the value of Fifteene poundes more per annum 
Witnesses Nicholas Aldridge. Robert Aldridge. William Juell 

Fileden. Item wee present that there are two Parsonages and a vic- 
caridge : the one Parsonage is held by Mr. John Duke of Lake whose right 
wee know not, of the value of Threescore poundes per Annum ; he payes 
olde rent formerly to the Deane and chapter of Winton, now to the Trustees, 
sixe poundes per annum, and to the Viccar from that Parsonage by way of 
Endowment per annum fortie shillings. Thother Parsonage was appro- 
priated to the Treasurer of the Church of Sarum held in Lease by Baronett 
VOL XL. — NO. CXXIX. U 



258 The Church Survey in Wilts, 1649—50. 

Seymour Pyles payes the old rent of Twentie three pounds per annum. The 
value of the parsonage is one hundred and Three-score poundes per annum. 
The Viccaridge is a presentacion in the guifte of the State of the value of 
fiftie poundes per annum Mr George Pitt is the present Incumbent supplies 
the Cure preacheth everie Lordes day and receiveth the profittes of the Vic- 
caridge. Memorandum that Knighton of this parish is vnited to Durington 
as before in the title of Durington. Witnesse George Batter. 

Bulforde. Item wee present that in Bulforde there is a Parsonage im- 
propriate, the Fee thereof is l Mr John Duke and Mr. George Duke who 
are to provide a Curate. The Church is auntiently endowed but with 
Twenty nobles per annum payable by Mr. Duke but nowe Mr. George Duke 
payes the Curate Twentie poundes per annum The value of this impro- 
priacion is one hundred and Twentie poundes per annum. Mr. John Flower 
is the present Incumbent supplies the Cure preacheth every Lordes day 
once and expounds and receives the said Twentie poundes per annum for 
his paines : Its thought fitt that theparishe of Bulford be vnited to Milston 
and Brigmiston and that the Church att Milson be scituate fittly and made 
convenient to receive the whole congregacion of the Three Hamletts but it 
is prayed by : the Inhabitantes of Bulford which is a through fare to the 
West that the Church may stand and that the Minister of the whole united 
Parishe doe preache there once everie Lords day att the leaste there beinge 
the greatest number of Inhabitantes Witnesses : — James Griste. Mr George 
Duke. William Lester. 

Amesbury Item wee present that in Amesbury there is a Parsonage 
wholy appropriated to the late Deane & Cannons of Windsor held in lease 
by Mr. Edward Tooker of the value of Twoe hundred and Fiftie poundes 
per annum out of which he payes olde rent Fortie poundes per annum to 
the Trustees. The Lessee is bound to provide a Curate. The Church is 
auntiently endowed with Twentie poundes per annum. Mr. Vriah Banckes 
supplies the Cure preacheth Twice everie Lordes day and receiveth the 
said Sallerie of Twentie poundes per annum and alsoe of Mr. Tooker Five 
and Twenty pounds per annum more which he is enjoy ned to pay the curate 
by the will of Mr William Eyre deceased duringe the Lease from Windsor. 
The Curate receiveth alsoe the said Fortie poundes per annum by order of 
the Committee of Plundred Ministers soe that the whole Sallery of the 
Curate is Eighty Five poundes per annum. Witnesses : — William Weeks 
Richard Harrison. James Ratway. 

Dorneford Item wee present that the Parsonage is appropriated to 
the late Deane and Chapter of Sarum worth per annum three 
hundred poundes held in lease by Mr. Vaughan who paies the old 
rent of Thirtie poundes per annum. There is likewise a Viccaridge 
endowed with twelve poundes per annum to the Curate which viccaridge 
is a presentacion in the guift of the State. The whole value of the Viccaridge i 
with the Twelve poundes is in all Forty eight poundes per annum. Mr. 

1 in omitted. 



Communicated by the Vcn. Archdeacon E. J. Bodington. 259 

'[Edward] Holland is the present Incumbent whoe preacheth once everie 
Lords day supplieth the cure and receiveth the Profittes. Its thought 
convenient that litle Dorneford Farme be vnited to Stratford Church 
which is in Vnderditch hundred because it is distant from its Parishe 
Church about Two myles. Its thought also convenient that Great 
Dorneford litle Dorneford Netton Saltertowne and New Townedoe remaine 
one Parishe and that the Church be scituated in a more convenient place 
about the middest for the better comeing together of the people. 

Memorandum That the Inhabitantes of Normington Farme are vnited 
to Wilsford and Lake, — vide in Vnderditch hundred. Witnesses : — Jarrett 
Browne. Robert Mundye. Thomas Hay ward. 

Choldrington Item wee present that the Parsonage is a presentacion 
in the guifte of the Lady Kinsmell of the value of Threescore poundes per 
annum Mr. Nathan Noyes is the present Incumbent supplies the cure k 
preacheth Twice every Lords day and receiveth the profitts. Witnesses : — 
Robert Noyes. Thomas Gilbert. 

Newton Toney Item wee present that there in Newton Toney a 
Parsonage being a presentacion in the guifte of 2 [Queen's] Colledge in 
Cambridge, the next avoydance only is in Doctor Davenant the Parsonage 
is of the value of one hundred and Thirty poundes per annum. There is 
alsoe a proporcion of Tythes issueinge out of Mr. Jones Farme in Newton 
Toney payable formerly to a Farme in Boscombe it being Crowne land : its 
a sequestracion from Mr. Ryley. Mr. John Wattes is the present Incumbent 
supplies the Cure preacheth twice every Lordes day and receiveth the 
profittes. Witnesses : — Thomas Be vis. William Child 

Alington Item wee present that there is in Alington a presentacion in 
the guifte of Robert Walloppe Esquire of the value of Threescore poundes 
per annum Mr Peter Titley supplies the Cure preacheth constantlie Twice 
every Lords day and receiveth the Profittes Witnesses Anthony Goodall. 
John Miller and Richard Adams. 

Boscombe Item wee present that there is in Boscombe a Parsonage 
being a presentacion in the guifte of the State (formerly of the Bishopp of 
Sarum) of the value of three score poundes per annum There is alsoe a 
proporcion of Tythes held by Stephen Kent of Boscombe gentleman being 
Crowne land of the value of Twenty and Five poundes per annum. Mr. 
James White is the present Incumbent supplies the cure preaches once 
every Lords day and catechiseth and reades common prayer constantlie and 
doth not keepe any Fast daies or daies of thancksgivinge ordeined by the 
Parliament but he alsoe reades common praier twice in the weeke daies 
duely. Its thought fitt that the two parishes of Alington and Boscombe 
being but half a myle asunder be vnited and made one congregacion and 
that the parishe Church of Boscombe be scituate and made convenient to 
receive the whole congregacion of both places Its alsoe thought fitt that 
a Church path be made (to be onely for a Church path) through such 
private groundes as lye most convenient for the Inhabitantes at Alington 

1 Blank in original. 2 Blank in original. 

U 2 



260 the Church Survey in Wilts, 1649 — 50. 

to goe to the church at Boscombe. As alsoe wee conceive itt convenient 
that the same order be taken for Church pathes in all other places where 
alteracions in Parishes are in this County. Its alsoe thought fitt that the 
Inhabitantes that live nigh to Boscombe nowe in the parish of Idmiston 
bee vnited to Boscombe to be of that congregacion, videlicet, the Families 
of the widdow Chandler M ris Hayward, Richard Worte, Lionell Clerke, 
Nicholas Perrin and Docter Hides Farme, William Cole, William Judd, 
Robert Eddington, Christofer Marshall, Widdow Hort, John Nott and 
John Corde. [Witnesses] Tho. Hancocke. Anth. Trotman. Fran. Dove. 
Edward Manning. James Abbott. 



II. Valuations of Church Property, 

Wokingham 1 Berks A Survey of the Rectorie and Parsonage of 
Wokingham with the rights members and appurtenances thereof scituate 
lyeing and being in Com. Berks late parcel of the possessions or late be- 
longing to the late Deane of the Cathedrall Church of the Virgin Mary of 
Sarum in Com. Wilts made and taken by vs whose names are herevnto 
subscribed in the moneth of Aprill 1650. By vertue of a Commission to 
vs gravnted grounded vpon an Act of the Commons of England assembled 
in Parliament, &c. 

All which premisses amongst other things, That is to say all that the 
Rectory or Parsonage of Woakingham with all Howses Barnes edifices and 
buildings and all demeasne lands tenements rents closes and Gleabe 
lands togeather with all manner of Tythes oblations obventions 
Fruits Commodityes emoluments advantages and profitts to the sayde 
parsonage or to the sayde Deane and his successores by reason of 
the sayde Parsonage in any wise appertayneing or belonging were 
per indenture dated the seaventeeneth of Decem- 
Redditus, 26, 13,04, ber 5° Caroli demised by John Bowie, Deane 

apportioned, of the Cathedrall Church of the Virgin Mary of 

vizt. Sarvm vnto Thomas Barker of Chiswicke in the 

Lands, 03, 00, 00. County of Middlesex Esqr. Habendum the premisses 

Tithes, 23, 13, 04. to the sayde Thomas Barker his heires and assignes for 

and dureing the naturall lives of William Barker 

In toto 26, 13, 04. Thomas Barker and Henry Barker sonnes of the sayde 
Dec(V 9th Thomas Barker and the life of every of them longest 

Wm. Webb 1650 liveing vuder the yearely Rent of Twenty-six pounds 
thirteene shillings and fowre pence at the Feastes of 
the Annunciation of the Virgin Mary and St Mychaell the Archangell by 
even porcions But are worth vpon Improvement over and above the sayde 
Rent per annum 173li 6s 08d 

If the sayde Rent be vnpayde by the space of Two monthes being lawfully 
required then a re-entry and the Grant to be voyde. 

The Lessee doth covenant at his proper costs and charges to finde and 



1 Lambeth Pari. Surveys, Vol. XV., pp. 64—66. 
The name of the month is partly hidden by the binding. 



Communicated by the Ven. Archdeacon E. J. Boding ton. 261 

ordeyne one able Priest to serve in the sayde parrish and to repaire the 
chauncell of the sayde Church and all other the premisses etc. 

The Lessor doth covenant that for the repaireing of the sayde Chauncell 
and premisses it shall and may be lawfull for the Lessee from tyme to 
tyme to cutt and take sufficiently (sic) Tymber and Stuffe in and vpon the 
premisses And that the sayde Lessor shall beare and all Dismes subsidies 
and other charges as well ordinary as extraordinary whatsoever due or to 
be due out or for the premisses 

Henry Barker aged Two and Twenty only liveing. 

Chr. Weare Walt. Foy Jo: Squibb Geo. Fairley Surveyors. 

Ex. per Will Webb Supervisor Generall, 1650. 

Exr. Ra: Hall Regist. Dept. Endorsed : Recept. 7th May 1650. 

Swallowfeild 1 A Survey of the several Rectories and tithes impropriate 
hereafter mencioned scituate lying and being in the severall Counties 
hereinafter mencioned with the rights members and appurtenances to the 
same belonging and apperteyninge and late belonging to the Deane and 
Chapter Treasurer and Chaunter of the Cathedrall Church of St. Ethelbert 
in Hereford and taken by us Surveyors whose names are subscribed the 
fifteenth daye of October in the yeare of our Lord God one thousand six 
hundred fortie and nine by virtue of a Commission to vs graunted grounded 
vppon an Act of the Commons of England assembled in Parliament for the 
abolishinge of Deanes, Deanes and Chapters, Cannons, Prebends & other 
Offices of and belonginge to any Cathedrall Church or Chappell within 
England and Wales vnder the hands and seales of five or more of the 
Trustees in the said Act named by our veiwes and perambulations and ex- 
amination of wittnesses vppon Oath. 

Rectoria de Shiningfield et Swallowfeild in Com. Berkes. All that the 
Rectory of Shiningfeild & Swallowfeild Co Berks & 
Edward Ellis &, Wiltes. consisting in Shiningfeild of one faire Antient 
John Ellis gent. Parsonage House of substantial! timber building con- 
taining vii bayes of building & of three Barnes and one 
Beast house containing 9 bayes & of two Orchardes one Garden and a 
Courtyard containing in the whole about one Acre and of one close called 
or knowne by the name of Somers cont: by estimation v. acres and of iiij. 
acres of meadow ground being iij acres of lett ground lying in the Common 
Mead there, <fc ij acres of arrable lying in the common feild there called k 
distinguished by the name of the Glebelands, and of the Tithe of Corne, 
graine oates hay, & coppice wood arriseing, comeinge groweing or happening 

i in Shiningfield aforesaid 

And alsoe consisting in Swallowfeild of one faire Parsonage house built 

; of timber and bricke cont. by estimation iiij bays and tenne bayes of 

i Barneing, or thereaboutes to the same belonging, & of one Orchard one 
Garden & one Little Croft of Land to the same adioyning, containing by 
estimation ij acres, and of all their tithe and Tenth of Corne <fc graine, 
Oates, hay & coppice wood arriseing growing or happening in Swallowfeild 

! aforesaid with all and singuler their appurtenances to the same belonging. 

1 Lambeth Pari. Surveys, Vol. X., p. 205. 



262 The Church Survey in Wilts, 1649—50. 

Memorandum. The premisses are affirmed to be granted by the Deane 
and Chapter of the cathedral Church of Ethelbert in 
Rent xxli Hereford by Indenture of Lease vnder their Common 

This Lease to Seale dated the xxvth of June in the xith yeare of Queen 

bee produced Elizabeth to HenryEllis gent for the terme of lxxx yeares 

to commence from and after one Lease made of the 
Premisses to Thomas Cople gent, dated the first day of March in the Fourth 
& Fifth of Philip & Mary for the terme of xxix yeares, which lease was 
to commence from & after the end of one other Lease made of the premisses 
by the said Deane & Chapter to Sir Thomas Eglefeild knight dated the 
vth day of August in the xxvith yeare of King Henry the viiith for the 
Terme of xxix yeares to begin from the second day of May in the yeare of 
our Lord God 1546 for and under the yearely rent of xxli. to bee paid 
Midsomer & Christmas by equall porcions and the premisses are cleerely 
worth over and above the said rent per annum — ccxiiili. 

In the Lease is excepted the nominacion presentacion &, patronage of the 
Viccaridge there. There is likewise a clause of Re-entry for non-payment 
of the said rent within viij weekes at the Cathedrall Church. The Leassee 
is to keepe the said Parsonage houses buildinges & the chauncell of the 
church of Shiningfeild & the chappell of Swallowfeild in repaire. The 
Viccaridge of the said parrish is worth about Ixxxxli per annum in Glebe 
lands and small Tythes, the same being sequestred by reason of one Mr. 
Will. Cozens the now Viccar there his delinquency. John Ellis hath the 
Estate for the Terme to come in the Parsonage house & Glebelandes &, 
Tythes in Shiningfeild. Edward Ellis hath the like estate in the Parsonage 
house Tithes & premisses in Swallowfeild. Wee value the said Parsonage 
house with the appurtenances & Glebelands in Shiningfeild to bee worth 
per annum xli. & the Tithe there to be worth per annum cl u . 00s. OOd. 
Wee value the Parsonage house, Barnes Orchards Garden and Croft in 
Swallowfeild to bee worth per annum vili. and the Tithes there to bee worth 
per annum lxxiiij 11 . 00s, OOd. 

There is an indorsement on the backeside of the Lease produced that the 
Lease was inrolled in Chauncery the xvjth Junii Jacobi Regis 1 which upon 
search of the Records there is found to bee true. 

An Abstract of the present Rentes & future Improvements. 

The present rents of the severall premisses amounts to per annum 
cccxviij. li. xixs. vjd. 

The severall Corne rentes being 72 quarters of wheate 4 Quarters of Rye 
& 272 bushells of oates is per annum cxix. iiij. 00. 

The future Improvements of the severall premisses wilbee at the ex- 
piration of the severall termes amountes to clxiiij. 00. xjd. 

Reprisalls. There hath been vsually time out of mind reprisalls paid by 
the Deanes & Chapters or whom they appointed to the Schoole Master of 
the free schoole in the Citty of Hereford xxs. per annum. & to the Usher 
there xli. per annum, some of which wee find hath issued out of the 
Rectoryes, & wee therefore here reprize them it being in all per annum 
xxx 11 . 00. 00. 



1 Date of year not given. 






Communicated hy the Vcn. Archdeacon E. J. Bodington. 263 

There hath also been paid by the said Dean & Chapter to a poore Scholler 
sent to the University of Oxford, which at present is one Thomas Readinge 
of All Soules, and is to continue to the said Schollers soe sent, vntill they 
bee ordinary M rs of Artes the somme of 4li. per annum iiij u . 00. 00. 

The Rectoryes of Shiningfield & Swallowfeild hath been vsually with 
some other Rents paid in to the M r of the Fabricke, towarde the repaire 
of the said Cathedrall Church. 

There hath beene vsually paid to the two Sextons of the said Cathedrall 
Church to keepe the said Cathedrall decent & ring the bells for Sermons 
per annum xxvli. 00s. OOd. 

Ex. per Will. Webb surpervisor Generall. 

Miles Hill. Jam. Cooke. Fran. Eedes. 

Wilts Hectoria de Duringhton 1 A Survey of the Rectorie of 
Duringhton with the rights members and appurtenances thereto lyingeand 
being in the County of Wilts late parcell of the possessions or late belonging 
to the Deane and Chapter of the Cathedrall Church of the holly Trinitie 
of Winton made and taken by us whose names are herevnto subscribed in 
the month of October 1649. By virtue of a Commission to vs graunted, 
grounded uppon an Act of the Commons of England in Parliament assembled 
for the abolishinge of Deanes, Deanes and Chapters, Cannons Prebends and 
other offices and titles of and belonging to any Cathedrall or Collegiate 
Church or Chappell within England & Wales vnder the hands and seales of 
five or more of the Trustees in the said Act named and appointed. 

There belongeth to the said Rectoryeia Parsonage house consistinge of 
three small lowre roomes three litle vpper roomes Two barnes a stable and 
a backside conteyninge in the whole by estimacion oue acre of ground the 
house built with tymber and Flemmish wall and covered with Thatch all 
which wee value to bee worth per annum iijli. 

Gleabe Land belonginge to the said Rectorie In South meade five Acres 
and a halfe of meadowe which wee value at three pounds the Acre per 
annum amounting to 0o acr. 02 roods, xvjli. xs. per annum. 

In Cottes close one acre of dry Meade which [we] value worth per annum 
01. acr. 00. roods xxxs. 

In Priestes Close thirtie Perch of dry meadowe which wee value worth 
per annum 00. acr. 00. roods vs. vijd. ob. 

The Arrable Land lyeing in the Common Feilde within the parish of 
Duringhton belonginge to the said Rectorie conteygninge by estimacion one 
hundred thirtie nine acres and one roode wee value at six shillinges eight 
pence per annum amounting to 139 acr. 01 roods, xlvjli. viijs. iiijd. 

There belongeth to the said Rectorie commons for two hundred and Fiftie 
Sheepe which wee value to bee worth per Annum 00 acr. 00 roods, vli. 

There belongeth therevnto Commons for tenn Cowes and five Runners 
which wee value worth per Annum 00 acr. 00 roods, iijli. 

There belongeth to the sd. Rectory the tithes of the parish of Durrington 
of all sortes which wee value worth per annum cxliiijli. 0s. 0b. 

. l Lambeth Pari. Surveys, Vol. XVI., pp. 282—284. 



264 The Church Survey in Wilts, 1649—50. 

Memorandum. William Kent by Indenture of Lease bearinge date 8° 
Octobris 17° Caroli graunted by the Deane & Chapter of Winton holds all 
the abovemencioned premisses with the appurtenances 
Redditus xxli. for the tearme of twenty one yeares from Michaellmas 
last past before the said date vnder the reserved yearelie 
rent of twenty pounds. But is worth vppon improvement over and above 
the said rent cccixli. xs. 

The said Will. Kent present Tennant. There was thirteene yeares of the 
said tearme to come at Michaellmas last. 

Abstract of the Lease : — An Indenture of Lease bearinge date 8° Octobris 
1*7° Caroli graunted by the Deane and Chapter of Winton demiseing vnto. 
William Kent, all that their Rectorye and Parsonage of Duringhton with all 
houses tenements Barnes, Dove-houses, Orchards, Gardens Gleabe lands 
meadows and rents revercions services woods vnderwoods and commons to 
the same belonginge togeather with all and all manner of Tythes as well 
Prediall as personall, and all other rights oblacions profittes obvencions to 
the same belonginge or which at any tyme heretofore have bynn accompted 
as parte parcell or member of the said Parsonnage or Rectorie belonginge 
to the same Except all waies to the Deane and Chapter and their Successors 
All that messuage or dwellinge house and tenemente latelie builded by 
William Kent latelie deceased father of the said William Kent, partie to 
theis presents vppon some parte of the premisses at the sole costs and 
charges of the said Kent deceased for a habitacion for the Minister or Curate 
togeather with a backside and garden plott therevnto a.djoyninge and now 
in the tenure of Leonard Martinne 1 clerke, minister there, which said house 
and tenement is intended and the said Deane etc. with the good iikeing of 
the said Kent are well contented it shall remaine for ever for the vse of the 
Minister there. The said Minister or Curate from tyme to tyme sufficientlie 
repairinge the same at his owne proper costs and charges And in default 
thereof the same reparacions to bee made and donne as it shall please the 
said Deane &c. And that the costs and charges for doeinge thereof shall bee 
deducted foorth of the Sallerye or wages of the said Minister or Curate by 
theis presents covenanted to bee paid at the discrecion of the said Deane 
etc, and the Lessee to bee discharged of soe much of the same by him 
therein covenanted to bee paied as the charges of the reparacions which the 
Lessee shall bee at thereabouts from tyme to tyme shall amount vnto any 
covenant Provise or agreement for pavement of the said Sallerye in theise 
presents conteyned &c. Except all and all manner of Offeringes and 
Oblaciones at Easter and all benefitts profitts and Fees, for or by reason 
of marriages christings and burialls to bee performed within the parish of 
Duringhton to the vse and benefitte for the said Curate thereof for the tyme 
being). This exception to beginne at the ende and expiracion of one yeare 
next ensueinge the date of theise presents and to continue to the ende of the 
terme hereafter mencioned. Habendum the said Rectorie &c. with all 
houses Tenantries Barnes dovehouses orchards etc. (except before excepted) 
vnto the said William Kent etc. from Michaellmas last past for the tearme 
of twenty-one yeares vnder the reserued yearelie rent of twenty pounds 
payable at the Nativitie and St. John Baptist by equall portions. 

1 The name of the minister here and below should be Maton. See p. 256. 






Communicated by the Ven. Archdeacon E. J. Bodington. 265 

The Lessee covenanteth to provide a sufficient preachinge minister resident 
there. Allso covenanteth to paye yearelie duringe the saide tearme twenty 
pounds to the said Minister at the said fowre vsuall Feastes in ye yeare by 
equall porcions and allsoe fowre bushells of Wheate and fowre bushells of 
mault at the Feast of Thomas the Apostle the said Minister to bee nominated 
by the Lessee duringe the said tearme aud to bee approued of by the said 
Deane &c ; the Lessee to beare and paye all charges goeinge out of the 
premisses as well to the Bishopp and Archdeacon as to the Lord of the 
Towue att his costs duringe the said tearme, The tenths due to the Kings 
Maiestie yearlie of and from the premisses and allwaies excepted) (sic) and 
the Lessee to repaire the premisses (except before excepted) and the 
Chauncell of the said Church at his proper costes and charges. The Lessor 
covenanteth to ratifie and agree vnto all Actions for Recoverie of any rights 
and dueties belonginge to the premisses at the Lessees costs and charges, 
soe as the Lessee from tyme to tyme acquitte and save harmlesse yr Lessor 
from alldammages&c. that shall or may accrewe or growe by reason of any 
suit etc. to bee commenced as aforesaid. And if the rent bee behinde sixe 
weekes Then this Indenture to bee voyd. 

Reprizes. 

Memorandum. There is twenty pounds yearelie to bee paide by the 
Lessee out of the premisses to the Minister of the Parish of Duringhton at 
the fowre vsuall feastes in the yeare as by the Abstract of the Lease herevnto 
annexed may appeare. xxli. 

The Lessee is likewise to paye vnto the said Minister fowre Busshells of 
wheate and fowre busshells of Mault yearelie at the Feast of St. Thomas 
the Apostle which wee value worth communibus annis xxxiijs. iiijd. 

There is likewise to be reprized for repairinge of the Chauncell of the 
parrish church aforemencioned yearelie xiijs. iiijd. 

Leonard Martinne Minister of the said Parish. 

Robert Voyce. Edward Hooker. James Quarles. Francis Hodges. Exam', 
per Will. Webb supervisor generall. 1 649. 

Wilts 1 Rectoria de North Tidworth. A Survey of the Rectory or 
portion of Tythes of North Tydworth with the rights members and appur- 
tenances thereof lying and being in the County of Wiltes, late parcell of the 
possessions or late belonging to the Dean and Chapter of the Cathedrall 
Church of the Holy Trinity of Winton, made and taken by vs whose 
names are herevnto subscribed in the moneth of October 1649 by vertue 
of a commission to vs granted, grounded vpon an Act of the Commons 
of England assembled in Parliam 1 ((fee, as above) 

Imprimis there belongeth to the said Rectory the Tithe corne of Fifty 
acres of Ground in Baliffe Farme yeareley which wee value worth com- 
munibus annis Ten pounds xli. 

There doth also belong therevnto the Tythe corne of six acres of land in 
Mr. Bunkleys Farme which wee value worth communibus annis Twenty 
foure Shillings — xxiiijs. 

There doth likewise belong therevnto Tithe Corn out of Foure acres of 

1 Lambeth Pari. Surveys, Vol. XVL, pp. 291—292. 



266 The Church Survey in Wilts, 1649—50. 

ground in Mr. Pitman's Farme which wee value worth commumibusannis 
sixteen shillings xvjs. 

There belongeth to the said Rectory the Tithe Wooll and Lamb of the 
Sheep going on Bailiffs Farme, (excepting Two Fleeces and Two Lambs 
payable thereout yearely to the Parson, which wee value worth com- 
munibus annis Nine pounds, ixli. 

The Tithe Wooll and Lambe of Berry Flocke belongeth to the said Rectory 
(except two Lambs aud two Fleeces payable thereout yearly to the Parson) 
which wee value worth communibus annis Nine pounds, ixli. 

John Mompesson by Indenture of Lease dated 26° Junii 13° Car. granted 
by the said Deane and Chapter of Winton, holds the said Rectory or portion 
of Tythes with thappurtenances for the Terme of Twenty one yeares from 
Michaelmas last past before the said date, vnder the 
Redditus iijli. reserved yearly rent of Three pounds payable at Thannun- 
ciation and Michaelmas by equall porcions, but is worth 
vpon Improvement over and above the said Rent Twenty seaven pounds 
per Annum, xxvijli. 

The Leasee by Covenant to yeild pay and performe All & Every other 
payments reparacions, thing and things, due and payable going out of, or 
belonging vnto the said demised premisses. 

And if the said yearely rent of Three pounds bee behinde by the space 
of Forty dayes after either of the said Feasts, Then the Lease to bee void. 

The said John Mompesson present Tennant There was Nine yeares of 
the said Terme to come at Michaelmas last. 

Memorandum there hath beene and is a Composicion betweene the 
Minister of the Parrish of North Tydworth and the Tennant of the Deane 
and chapter there, by which the Parson of the said Parrish is to enjoy the 
full Tithes of Berry Flocke, the Tithes of the Six Acres in Mr. Bunkley' 
Farme, and of the Foure Acres in Mr. Pitman's Farme, and the said Tennan' 
in lieu thereof to enjoy that part of the Tithes of Bailiffes Farme, which 
did belong vnto the Parson ; The said contract wee have seene vnder hand 
and seale 

Mdum. The full Tythes of Baliffes Farme, which the Tennant wholly 
enjoyeth is worth Thirty pounds per Annum 

Robert Voyce. Edward Hooker. Jam. Quarles. Fran. Hodges. 
Examt. per Will. Webb Supervisor Generall. 1649. 

Fighelden KJ A Survey of the Rectory and Impropriate Parsonage of 
Fighelden alias Fieldhen within the Parrishe of Feildhen in the County of 
Wilts, 2 consistinge of — 

One Barne, contayninge fiue Bayes of Buildings thatcht in good repayre, 
a Cowyard adjoyninge therevnto, one Meadow called Neawton Meade 
abutting one the River on the north side of Feildhen Bridge cont. by 
estimacion three roods ; one other plott of meadow T abutting on the sayde 

1 Lambeth Pari. Surveys, Vol. XV., pp. 252—255. 

2 Part of the possessions of the Treasurer of the Cathedral of Salisbury 
(see heading to the survey of the rectory of Calne, with which this was 
returned 9th July, 1649.) 



Communicated by the Ven. Archdeacon E. J. Bodington. 267 

River and adioyneinge to a Meadow now in the possession of Ellis South 
conteyneinge by estimacion one Roode and worth per annum Olacr. Or. 
iiili. 00. 00. 

One Close of Pasture Lyeing in Knighton withine the parrishe of Feildhen 
called dry close adjoyneinge to a close now in the possession of Mr. Phillip 
Poore conteyneinge by estimacion twoe Roods and worth per annum OOacr. 
2r. xs. 

Fifty nine Ridges lyeinge dispersedly in the Common Feilds of Feildhen 
and Knighton withine the Parrishe of Feildhen conteyneing by estimacion 
xxx acres whereof xx Acres being yearely sowen communibus annis together 
with the pasturage of 160 sheepe to depasture on the common Downes and 
Feildes within the said parrishe worth per annum 30acr. OOr. xli. 

One little plott of Arrable called the Ham in Knighton withine the sayde 
parrishe bounded with the Land of Mr. Phillip Poore on the North conteyning 
by estimacion 3 Roodes and worth per annum — OOacr. 03r. iiijs. 

The Tythe Corne and Graine of all sortes withine the sayde parrishe 
communibus annis is worth per annum — clxxxxviijli. xvjs. 

The Tythe Hey belonginge to the said parsonage withine the said parrishe 
communibus annis is worth per annum — viijli. xvjs. 

The Tythe Wooll belongeinge to the parson is only of Sheepe kepte on 
the West side of the Riuer there and communibus annis worth per annum 
— vli. 

The Totall Number of Acres — 32acr. Olr. Summe Totall of the present 
profitts per Annum — ccxxvjli. vjs. 

Memorandum. Seymour Pyle of Compton Beauchampt in the County of 
Berks esqr. by Indenture of Lease dated the Sixth of May in the 1 7th yeare 
of the late Kinge Charles graunted by Edward Davenant Doctor of Divinity 
and late Treasurer of the Cathedrall Church of the Virgine Mary in Sarum, 
Holdeth all the last mencioned premisses with thappurtenances. That is 
to say, All that the Parsonage of Fighelden in the County of Wilts, with all 
the Lands, Feedinges Commons, Tythes, Fruits, and all 
Redditus xxiijli. other commodities, emoluments advantages and profitts 
to the same parsonage by any manner groweinge or be- 
longinge, with all and singuler thappurtenances (except the Advowson of 
the Viccaridge of the same Church of Fighelden which is reserved to the 
aforesaid Treasurer of the Church of Sarum) For the terme of twenty and 
one yeares from the Feast of the Annunciation last past before the date 
vnder the reserved yearely Rent of xxiiili. payeable att the Feasts of St. 
Michaell the Arkangell and of the Annunciation of the blessed Virgin by 
even portions, but they are worth vppon Improvement (as before appeareth) 
over and above the sayde Rent per Annum — cciijli. vjs. 

If the sayde Rent or any parte thereof be behinde by the space of Twenty 
dayes after any of the termes aforesaid beinge demannded and noe distresse 
found, then a Reentry. 

A Covenaunte on the behalfe of the Lessee to repayre and to keepe well 
repayred And to pay all charges and Taxes, ordinary and extraordinary 
excepting all dismes and subsidies to bee payde for the Parsonage. 

A Covenante that the Lessee shall quietly enjoy the premisses dureinge 
the terme to come on the Fiue and Twentieth of March 1649. 



268 The Church Survey in Wilts, 1649—50, 

Examin' per Will. Webb supervisor generall. 

The Rent of xxiijli per annum reserverd hereon is thus apporcioned vizt. 
To be sould with the lands 1. 08. 00. To remayne vpon the tythe, 
21. 12. 10 In toto 23. 00. 00. 

Returned vnto the Registers Office for keepinge the 
Surveyes of Deanes and Chapters Lands the 9th of 
July 1649 by Walter Foy. Jo. Squibb. Chr. Weare. Geo. 
Fairley Surveyors. 

' 21st Will. Webb. Ex' Ra. Hall Regist. Dept. 

Endorsed : Decan : Sarum The Rectorie improp. of 
Calne and the Rector of Fighelden com. Wilts. Re- 
cept 9 July 1649. 

Wilts Rectory 2 & Parsonage of Ambrosbury A Survey of the 
Rectory and Parsonage of Ambrosbury in the County of Wilts late parcell 
of the possessions or late belonginge to the late Deane & Cannons of the 
Free Chappell of St. George within the castle of Winsore made and taken 
by us whose names are herevnto subscribed in the moneth of March 1649 — 
1650. By virtue of a commission to us graunted grounded vpon an Acte of 
the Commons of England assembled in Parliament for the abolishinge of 
Deane, Deanes & Chapters, Cannons, Prebends <fe other offices & titles of or 
belonging to any Cathedrall and Colledgiat Church or Chappell within 
England and Wales vnder the hands and Seales of Five or more of the 
trustees in the said Acte named and appoynted. 
Att present disposall. 

Annuall Rents Reserved Cleere Values & Improvements per annum 

A little house consistinge of a porch entry a hall a buttery & Three vpper 
roomes with a smale garden plott on the church yard side estimated worth 
over and above the repaires per annum xxs. 

The small Tythes belong to the said Rectory as cow white, calues fruites 
gardens eggs etc with the herbage of the Church Litton there are estimated 
to be worth communibus annis iiijli. 

Memorandum. The custome of the saide parish is to paye for a calfe 
fowre pence, for a cowe white two pence, for a garden a penny and for eggs 
a penny & the rest att agreement. Mr. Uriah Bankes is present Incumbent 
there. 

In Lease 

The greate tythe belonging to the said Rectory and yssuing out of black 
crosse feild containing by estimation 250 Acres, out of the South Mead 
hill feild containing by estimation 250 Acres, out of 
Edward Tooker Esq. great Southam feild cont. by estimation 250 Acres, 
out of Litle Southam feild cont by estimation 250 
Acres, out of Earles Feild containing by estimation 250 Acres, out of West 
Ambrosbury Feild cont. by estimation 400 Acres,out of the Countesse feild 
cont. by estimation 250 Acres, out of West Ambrosbury common mead 
cont. by estimation 4 Acres, out of Hopeing Meade cont. by estimation 2 

1 Lost in binding. 
2 Lambeth Pari. Surveys, Vol. XVI., pp. 183—185. 



Communicated by the Ven. Archdeacon E. J. Bodington, 269 

Acres, out of Farneham Mead cont. by estimation 2 Acres, out of Countesse 
Mead cont. 20 Acres, out of Two meadowes called Nothames mead cont. by 
estimation 2 Acres, out of Whittenam Mead cont. by estimation 130 Acres, 
And out of severall small iparcells of meadow &■ pasture lying and being 
within the aforesaid parishe of Ambrosbury cont. by estimation 100 Acres, 
all which are estimated to bee worth communibus Annis — cccli. 

Memorandum William Eyre of Lincolnes Inn in the county of Midd : 

Esquire By Indenture of Lease beareing 
Redditus xl.li Two Carkasses date the one and thirtith day of July in the 
of Mutton or xxvjs. viiijd. & seaventeenthyeareofthelateKinge Charles 
iiijli for tenthes & xxli. for the holds all the last mentioned premisses fore 
Curate. one and Twenty yeares from Michaelmas 

last before the date vnder the reserved 
yearely rent of forty pounds, And the carcases of two fatt mottons or one 
pound six shillings eight pence for the same att Michaelmas & our Lady 
day by equall portions, And alsoe foure poundes at Michaelmas onely, for 
the dischardge of tenthes. And Twenty pounds vnto the Currate to bee 
paide Quarterly (that is to say) att Michaelmass Christmass, Lady day and 
Midsommer, or within seaven dayes 'next after any of the said termes. 
But they are worth vpon Improvement over and above the said Rents & 
repares per annum — ccxxxiiijli, xiijs. iiijd. 

There was twelve yeares to come of the said terme att Michaelmas last 
past 1649. 

The Lessors etc hath demised all that there Rectory & Parsonage of 
Ambrosbury in the County of Wilts with all manner of Gleabe Landes, 
tythes, oblations obventions, fruites, profitts comodities emoluments and 
advantages whatsoever vnto the said Rectory and personage belonginge. 

The Church & Parsonage house of the said Rectory and Parsonage and 
the parcell of ground adjoyning the said house & all the offeringes and 
Tythes of white calues, gardens eggs, dutyes for Christenings, buryings, 
marriadges, & churchings of women, there commonly called surplice Fees & 
the placeinge and appointinge of the currate there (excepte and reserved to 
the said Lessor). 

The Lessee etc hath covenanted to pay all procurations & Synods and all 
payments & charges whatsoever as well ordinary as extraordinary payable 
out of or for the premises, and repaire & amend the Chauncell of the Parish 
church of Ambrosbury aforesaid & the Pattronage house there & soe to 
leave them, And also to find & provide sufficient breade meate drincke & 
lodgeinge for the said Lessors & servantes and sufficient stable Roome, hay 
litter provender and pasture for theire horses & geldings for two dayes and 
three nights att theire comeinge to Ambresbury aforesaid, and to alien sell 
or assigne their wholl estate (without Lycence except by will) ; covenantes 
not performed, the Leases to be voyde. 1 

1 Miss E. M. Thomson writes that this paragraph is verbatim as in the 
original. " I think it must mean that if the lessees alien, sell, &c, their whole 
estate in the Rectory of Amesbury without licence except by will, for which 
a licence would not be necessary) the lease would be void, or if the other 
covenants such as providing meat and drink, <fcc, as above,were not per- 
formed the lease would be void." 



270 The Church Survey in Wilts, 1649—50. 

Memorandum. The Seaventh day of March 1649, John Thorneton mad 
oath, that Edward Tooker of Salisbury Esqr. is executor of the last will and 
testament of the aforesaid William Eyre esqr deceased, By which the lease 
of the aforesaid Rectory & Parsonage of Ambrosbury in the County of Wilts 
aforesaid is come into his hands & possession. 

Memorandum. There is two parcells of land in vse with the Parsonage 
house aforesaid the one lyinge and beinge behind the said house and the 
other lyinge & beinge at the one end of the Church Litton there, which 
many of the most antient Inhabitants say they doe belonge vnto the Earle 
of Hartfort. The which land as wee find by some papers have bin questioned 
by the Deane and Cannons aforesaid. 

Retorn'd into the Registrs Office for the keepinge of the 
Survayes of Deanes and Chapters Lands the 20th 
May 1650. Dennis Taylor. Will. Stisted. Edmond 
Montjoy. Henry Langley. Surveyors. 
Exd. Will. Webb supervisor genii. 1650. 
Exd. Ra: Hall Registr. Deput. 

Wilts. Rectoria de Durneford. 1 A survey of the Prebend or Par- 
sonage of Durneford with the rights members and appurtenances thereof 
in Com Wilts, late parcell of the possessions or late belongeinge to Fredericke 
Vaughan clarke one of the late Prebendaries of the Cathedrall Church of 
the Virgine Mary of Sarum made and taken by vs whose names are herevnto 
subscribed, in the moneth of March 1649. By virtue of a Commission vnto 
vs graunted grounded vpon an Acte of the Commons of England assembled 
in Parliament (&c, as above.) 

There is belonginge to the Parsonage of Durneford aforesaid The Tythes 
of all Corne or Graine, Hay Wool and Lambe, groweinge and reneweinge 
Yearely wi thine the sayd Parrishe (Except the Tythe of graine Hay Wool! 
and Lambe, groweinge and reneweinge yeareley vpon fower Yard Landes in 
Little Durneford, and the Tythe Hay of certaine parcells of dry ground, 
meadowes, and alsoe the Tythes of all Graine Hay Wooll and Lambe, 
groweing and reneweinge vpon the Gleabe Lands aforesaid yearely which, 
doth belonge to the Viccar of the Parrishe Churche of Durneford aforesayde) 
All which Hey, excepte before excepted,is worth per annum — ccxlvli.xvs.iiijd, 

All which premisses that is to say All that the Prebend of Durneford 
with the Mancion House of the sayde Prebend Barnes Stables and all other 
edifices to the same belonginge togeather with all and singuler Tythes 
oblacions,Obvencions, Fruits Lands, Tenements Meadows, Leasues, Pastures, 
Commons, Woods, Waters, preheminencies, privilidges and advantages 
whatsoever to the said Prebend belonginge or in any wise appertayneinge 
(excepting alwayes as out of the premisses to the Prebendary and his suc- 
cessors of the said Prebend, the presentacion nominacion and disposicion 
from tyme to tyme,and att all tymes of and into the Vicarridge of Durneford 
aforesayde) were per Indenture dated 12° Octobris decimo sexto Caroli 1640, 
demised by Fredericke Vaughan Clarke, Prebendary of the Prebend of 
Durneford withine the Cathedrall Church of Sarum in Com. Wilts, vnto 

1 Lambeth Pari. Surveys, Vol. XV., pp. 276—281. 



Communicated by the Ven. Archdeacon E. J- Bodington. 271 

George Vaughan brother of the sayde Fredericke of Fallersdon in the 
Countye aforesayde Esquire and William Daniell of St. Margaretts neere 
Maryborough in the sayde County of Wilts esquire Habendum (except 
before excepted) to the sayd George Vaughan and William Daniell theire 

Executors and assignes from the date for 
Redditus xxxli To the viccar the terme of twenty one yeares, vnder the 
xijli apporcioned vizt., The yearly Rent of xxxli. at two termes in the 
lands 7. 1 2. 00. Tythes 34.08.00. yeare, vizt. att the Feasts of thannunciation 
—42. 00. 00. Will. Webb De- of the Virgine Mary, and of St. Michaell 
cember 1th, 1650. tharchangell by even porcions att the 

Mancion howse of the sayde Prebend. But 
are worth vpon Improvement over and above the sayde Rent per annum — 
cclxx.li. 

If the Rente bee behinde att any of the aforesayde dayes of payement 
beinge lawfully demaunded to enter and distreine etc : if by the space of 
xxviij dayes then a forfeiture of 40.s. nomine pence, and a distresse to bee 
taken for the same ; if by the space of 40tie dayes beeinge lawefully de- 
maunded and noe sufficiente distresse to bee found vppon the premisses 
then a Reentry. 

The Lessee is to repaire the Chauncell of the Church of Durneford and 
all the premisses etc. 

The Lessor is to paye and discharge all Tenthes dismes proxies,Synodalls, 
and all other charges due and payeable for the premisses as well to the 
Kinge as to the Bishopp and Ordinary of the Dioces of Sarum aforesaid 
or to any other person. 

A Covenant for quiett enioyeinge the premisses dureinge the terme 
(except before excepted) and excepting an annuall Rent of xij.li. graunted 
by the Lessor to the Deane and Chapter of the sayd Cathedrall Church of 
Sarum and theire successors dureinge the terme aforesaid for the vse and 
benefite of the Viccar of Durneford for the time beinge. 

There remaineth of the said Terme vnexpired 12 yeares from the 12th of 
October 1649. The Remaynder of the Terme is in Sr. George Vaughan of 
Fallersden Knte the Lessee. 

To be reprized out of thimproved value of the sayde Rectorye andpremisses 
an Annuall Rente or Pencion of xijli. due and payeable by the Lessee vnto 
the Viccar of Durneford for the time beinge by Covenante prout supra 
apparet ; which beeinge deducted the remainder of thimproved value (over 
and above the sayde yeareley Rente reserued and the sayd reprizallof xijli) 
is per Annum — 258. li = = 

Memorandums The Advowson and right of presentacionto the Viccaridge 
of Durneford aforesaid did belonge to the late Prebendary of the Prebend of 
Durneford now to the State. To the sayde Viccarage belongeth the Tythe 
of all Graine Hey Wooll and Lambe.groweinge and reneweingyearely vppon 
fower yard Lands in little Durneford, and allsoe the Tythe of all sorte of 
Graine, Hay, Wooll,and Lambe ; groweinge and reneweinge vpon the Gleabe 
Landes in Durneford and the Tythe Hey of all dry ground, meadowes, 
throughout the whole parrishe of Durneford and all priuy Tithes and an 
Annuity of xijli. yearely payde by the Lessee. 



272 The Church Survey in Wilts, 1649—50. 

The Viccaridge is worth per annum— l.li. = = The present Viccar 
there is Mr. Edward Holland. 

Ex' per Will. Webb supervisor Generall. Returned 
(amongst other things) into the Regist's Office for 
keepinge the Surveys of Deanes and Chapters Lands 
the 23rd of Aprill 1650, By Walter Foy. John Squibb. 
Chr Weare. Geo. Fairley. Surveyors. 
Ex' Ra ; Hall Regist. Dept. [Endorsed] : Recept 23 April 1650. 



Wiltshire Bibliography. List of Wiltshire Authors. 
Corrections and additions. 

The following names included in the list on pp. 213 — 230, above, 
should be extracted from that list. They would all be included in a 
Wiltshire Bibliography, as they are all the subject of memoirs, sermons, 
or other notices, but as no published writings have been noted by them, 
they are not properly included amongst Wiltshire " Authors." 

E. H. GoDDARD. 

Bowen, W. Cabell, Will. Chandler, Thos. Colston, Mrs. Dawes, 
J. W. Doel, James. Douglas, Ld. Archibald. Dunsdon, Charles. 
Durham, Admiral Sir P. Edmund, Saint. Fuller, J. M. F. Gale, 
Hen. Gilbert, W. Glare, Jonathan. Holland, Ld. Howard, Edward. 
Impey, Elijah. Jackson, E. D. Jones, Jacob. Kibblewhite, James. 
Kingston, Duchess of. Lawes, Edward. Michell, Sam. Morris, 
Peleg. Newton, John. Pembroke, Anne, Countess of. Pembroke, 
Phil. Herbert, 7th Earl. Penruddocke, Col. John. Poore, Sir Edward. 
Poore, Bp. Richard. Queensberry, Marquis of. Rhodes, Will. Rod- 
bard, Sarah. Scrope, Sir Richard. Seymour, Sir Edward. Seymour, 
Sir Thomas. Sharington, Sir Will. Sherfield, Hen. Short, George. 
Smith, Thos. Assheton. Somerset, Charles, 6th Dnke. Stratton, 
Richard. Taylor, Harriet. Thynne, Thos. Warneford, Sam. W. 
Waylen, G. S. A. Westbury, Lord. Woodrow, C. J. Wyatt, C. G. 

The following names should be added to the list :— Bevan, Mrs. S. K 
(Littlecote). Estcourt, T. G. B. Farrer, Percy. For der, Archibald 
(Salisbury). Kingsland, W. (Devizes). Lambert, R. C. Reskelly, 
Mrs. K. J. (Devizes). Slade, J. J. (Devizes). 



273 



WILTS OBITUARY. 
lit.- Col. Lord Alexander George Boteville Thynne, 

D.S.O., killed in action Sept., 1918. Third and youngest s. of 4th 
Marquis of Bath, and brother of the present Marquis. B. 1873, educated 
at Eton and Ball. Coll., Oxon. As an officer of the Wilts Yeomanry- 
he volunteered and served with the 1st Batt. of the Imperial Yeomanry 
in the S. African War, and was on the staff from 1900 to 1902. Secre- 
tary to Lt.-Governor of Orange River Colony, 1902. Reuter's Special 
Correspondent with Somaliland Field Force, 1903—4. Major of Wilts 
Yeomanry, 1908. Went to the front with another regiment. Com- 
manded 6th Batt. of Wilts Regt., 1917, and was afterwards transferred 
to command of another batt. of the regt., with which he was killed. 
He was twice mentioned in despatches, gained the D.S O., and was 
twice wounded, in July, 1916, and April, 1918. He unsuccessfully 
contested Frome Division, 1896, and Bath, in 1906, as a Unionist. 
M.P. for Bath, 1910, at both elections. He held the seat until his 
death. 

Obit, notice, Wiltshire Gazette, Sept. 19th ; Wiltshire Times, Sept. 
28th, 1918. 

Lt.-Col, Allan Armstrong, D.S.O., Wilts Regt., of Badbury 
House, Seend, died of wounds, Sept. 19th, 1918, aged 43. Eldest son 
of J. S. Armstrong. Educated at Bedford Grammar School and Sand- 
hurst. Served with Wilts Regt. 15 years in India and at home. Re- 
signed in 1910 and joined Messrs. J. Stone & Co., Engineers, London. 
Appointed, 1910, second in command of Wilts Territorial Batt., with 
which he went to India in 1914. Succeeded to command of the batt., 
1915, and accompanied it to Egypt, 1917. Served in the attack on 
Gaza and advance to Jerusalem and received the D.S.O. 

Obit, notices, Wiltshire Gazette, Sept. 26th and Oct. 3rd ; Wiltshire 
Times, Sept. 28th; Salisbury Journal, Oct. 5th, 1918. 

Iiieut.-Col. Jerome Boileau Allsopp, D SO., S. Lanes. 

Regt.. killed in action, May 27th, 1918. S. of Rev. R. W. Allsopp, 
V. of W. Lavington. B. Sept., 1879, educated at Stubbington, joined 
Imperial Yeomanry at outbreak of S. African War, received commission, 
wounded at Phillippolis, posted to S. Lanes. Regt., 1902, and served in 
India till 1916. Capt., 1914, Major, Jan., 1917,when he went to the front 
and commanded battalion at Battle of Messines and 3rd Battle of Ypres, 
Aug. 1st, 1917, where he was wounded. Returned to front Nov., 1917. 
Transferred, Feb., 1918, to command of another battalion. Twice 
mentioned in despatches and received the D.S.O. April, 1918. 

Obit, notices, Wiltshire Gazette, June 20th ; Times, Sept. 3rd ; Salis- 
bury Journal, Sept. 7th, 1918. 

Major Richard Fielding Morrison, killed in action, April 

25th, 1918, aged 27. Eldest s. of Lt.-Col. Hobart Morrison, of Johnstown 
VOL. XL. — NO. CXXIX. X 



274 Wilts Obituary, 

House, Cabinteeley, Ireland, and Clayton Croft, Salisbury. B.at Mhow, 
India, 1890, educated Wellington Coll. and Woolwich. Commissioned 
R.F.A., July, 1910. Joined 129th Howitzer Battery and served in 
France in the retreat from Mons, 1914. Served continuously with 
R.H.A. or R.F.A. lin France. Capt., July, 1916. Commanded, as 
major, a howitzer battery through the Battle of the Somme and was 
wounded Oct., 1917. Mentioned in despatches, 1915, received M.C. r 
1917. Married, 1916, Effie, d. of A. F. Ferrier, Ash Hurst, Killiney, 
Co. Dublin. 

Obit, notice, Salisbury Journal , May 11th, 1917. 

Major Dick Brown, M.C 4 , Wilts Regt., attached Lanes. Fusiliers. 

killed in action, April 14th, 1918, aged 31. Second s. of J. W. Brown. 

Eastrop Grange, Highworth. Commissioned in Wilts Regt., Feb., 1915,, 

acting captain, July, 1916 ; major, July, 1917, when he gained the M.C. 

Obit, notice, Wiltshire Gazette, Sept.. 12th, 1918. 

Major Henry Wyndham P. B. Farrer, M.C. with two 

bars, R.F.A., killed in action, Oct. 30th, 1918. Second s. of Canon 
Richard W. Farrer, South Canonry, Salisbury. Educated at Sandroyde 
and Bedford Grammar School. He was a fine athlete, and played in 
the Dorset Eleven for three years before the war. Passed into Woolwich 
Dec, 1912, commissioned Aug., 1914, went to France Oct., 1914, and 
served there continuously until his death. Three times mentioned in 
despatches and received M.C. with two bars, and Belgian Croix de 
Guerre. He was wounded six times, four of them seriously. 
Obit, notice, Times, Nov. 5th, 1918. 

Major Edmund H. GifFard, R.F.A., died Nov. 10th, of wounds 
received Nov. 9th, 1918. S. of H. R. GifFard, of Lockeridge House. 

Two of his brothers have already been killed in the war, and a third 
severely wounded. 

Obit, notice, Times, Nov. 15th, 1918. 

Capt. Wallace Mortimer ItOOke, Yeomanry, attached Wilts 
Regt. Died of pneumonia contracted on active service, Oct. 8th, 1918,. 
aged 28. S. of Mortimer Rooke, of The Ivy, Chippenham. 

Ziieut. H. W. Adam, R.F.A., killed by accident while flying, 
July 4th, 1918, aged 22. B. at Chirton, second s. of Rev. H. T. Adam, 
Curate of Calne 1879—92, Vicar of Chirton 1892—99. Educated at 
St. Bees Coll., Cumberland, and Queen's Coll., Camb. He had served 
for some time in the Royal Naval Air Force. 
Obit, notice, Wiltshire Gazette, July 25th, 1918. 

Lieut. Arthur Charles Sotheron Estcourt, M.C, 

R.A.F., killed in action, Aug. 8th, 1918. B. Sept. 26th, 1893, youngest 
son of Rev. E. W. Sotheron Estcourt, of Estcourt (Gloucs.), Rector 
of Long Newnton, formerly Vicar of Swindon. Commissioned in Wilts 
'■■'■■- Regt., Nov., 1914, from the Cambridge O.T.C., joined the R.A.F. and 
went to the front in May, 1918. 

Ob.it notice, Wiltshire Times, Aug. 31st, 1918. : 



Wilts Obituary. 275 

lit. Charles Penruddocke, eldest s. of Charles Penruddocke, of 
Compton Chamberlayne, killed in action in France, Oct. 4th, 1918, 
aged 25. Educated at Clifton and Sherborne, he joined the army 
before the war, but relinquished his commission. On the outbreak of 
war he rejoined and was posted to the 7th Wilts with which he remained 
until his death. He spent three winters at Salonica, where he was 
wounded Nov., 1917. Came to France with his regiment in the summer 
of 1918. His youngest brother was killed at Salonica April, 1917, and 
the surviving brother severely wounded in the head in the Battle of 
the Somme. 

Obit, notice, Wiltshire Gazette, Oct. 17th, 1918. 

lit. Nicholson Stuart Boillton, R.A.F., killed in action in 
France, Sept. 29th, 1918, aged 19. Second s. of Percy Boulton, of 
Westbury. Educated at Clarence School, Weston-super-Mare, trained 
with Inns of Court at Berkhampstead, joined R.A.F., trained at Oxford 
and Netheravon. Went to France Aug. 28th, 1918. 

Obit, notice and portrait, Wiltshire Times, Oct. 26th, 1918. 

Lieut. Henry Hope Hunt, killed in action, October 26th, 1918, 
aged 24. S. of H.H.Hunt,of Chippenham. Educated at St. Paul's School 
and the Secondary School, Chippenham,and St. John's Training College, 
Battersea. On outbreak of war he joined Q. Victoria Rifles and 
became chief N.C.O. of the Intelligence Staff at Brigade Head 
Quarters. Went to France, was wounded in battle of Arras and 
recommended for a commission on the field. Came home and joined 
Officers' Cadet Batt. at Pirbright and Reading. Commissioned in 
10th London Regt., transferred to the Air Force, qualified as pilot at 
Upavon and went to France six months ago. 
Obit, notice, Wiltshire Gazette, Nov. 7th, 1918. 

Lieut. R. J. Matthews, M.G.C., died of pneumonia in Grantham 
Military Hospital, Nov. 2nd, 1918, aged 20. Buried at Grantham. 
Youngest s. of C. Matthews, of the Cottage, Hilperton Road, Trow- 
bridge. Educated at Trowbridge High School, joined Army at 17 
and served in France, being wounded March, 1918. 
Obit, notice, Wiltshire Times, Nov. 16th, 1918 

2nd-Lieut. Cecil John Buckland, R.A.F., accidentally killed 

while flying at Oxford, Aug. 19th, 1918, aged 23. Buried at Holt. S. 
of A. G. Buckland, of Fir Lawn, Holt. Before the war in the em- 
ployment of the Zenith Carburetter Co., London. Joined the London 
Regiment, Aug., 1914, served in France two and a-half years, returned 
home as sergt.-major for a commission. Joined the R.A.F. and was 
trained at Reading and Oxford. 
Obit, notice, Wiltshire Times, Aug. 24th, 1918. 

2nd-Lieut. Victor Loder, Wilts Regt., killed in action in Palestine 
May, 1918. S. of James Loder, of Roundpond, Melksham. Before the 

X 2 



276 Wilts Obituary. 

war a draughtsman in the office of Messrs. Spencer & Co. He joined 
the army as a private three years ago. 
Obit, notice, Wiltshire Times, May 18th, 1918. 

2nd-Iiieut. Bruce James Sloper, M.C, 3rd Machine Gun 

Batt , killed in action, Aug. 31st, 1918, aged 26. Third s. of Marler K. 
Sloper, of Devizes. At outbreak of war he enlisted in 2nd/4th Wilts 
Volunteers and went to India. Invalided home and served with Reserve 
in England. Gained commission and went to France, Aug., 1917. 
Gained M.C. 1918. 

Obit, notice, Wiltshire Gazette, Sept. 5th, 1918. 

2nd-Lieut. Edwin John Brinkworth, died of wounds in 

France, Sept.t9th, 1918, aged 27. S. of Major Brinkworth, of Chippenham. 
Educated Chippenham Secondary School, worked in Savings Bank 
Department of London Post Office, and as a clerk in the Capital and 
Counties Bank. He joined the 26th Royal Fusiliers (Bankers' Batt.) 
and served two winters in the trenches in France, and throughont the 
Battle of the Somme. Obtained commission 1917 in 15th Durham 
Light Infantry. 

Obit, notice, Wiltshire Gazette, Sept. 12th, 1918. 

2nd-Lieut. Prank Comb Ceaton, East Surrey Regt. Killed 
in action, Oct. 14th, 1918, aged 19. Younger s. of E. J. C. Ceaton, of 
Devizes. Educated at Secondary School, Devizes, a teacher at St. 
Peter's, Devizes, Elementary School. Joined London Scottish, Feb., 
1917, served with the Warwicks and afterwards as a cadet in the Guards' 
Training School, at Bushey. Commissioned July, 1918, went to France, 
Sept. 14th.. 

Obit, notice, Wilts Gazette, Oct. 24th, 1918. 

2nd Xiieut John Folliott, Durham L. I., killed in action, Sept. 

19th, 1918, aged 20. S. of J. A. Folliott, of Salisbury. Educated at 

Salisbury, Sherborne, and Sandhurst. Commissioned Dec, 1917, went 

to the front April, 1918, and was commended for gallantry on May 21 st. 

Obit, notice, Times, Oct. 7th ; Salisbury Journal, Oct. 5th, 1918. 

2nd-Iiieut. Edward Prank Ponting, Manchester Regt. 

killed in action in France, Oct 5th, 1918, aged 30. Second s. of Edward 
Ponting, of Trowbridge. Educated at the British School, Trowbridge. 
Before the war was employed in the Co-operative Wholesale Society, 
Manchester. Joined the R.G.A., May, 1915, and served in England. 
Commissioned in Manchester Regt., Aug., 1917, and went to France in 
October. Shortly after was transferred to Italian front, returning to 
the French front, Sept. 17th, 1918. Leaves a widow and young child. 
Obit, notice, Wiltshire Times, Oct. 19th, 1918. 

The E»ev. William Symonds, died July 1st, 1918, aged eo. 

Buried at Packenham (Suff.). Magd. Coll., Oxon, B.A. 1881, M.A. 1884. 
Deacon 1882, priest 1883 (Manchester). Curate, St. James, Accrington, 
1882—4; Vicar of Clandown (Som.), 1884—86; Curate of St. Andrew's, 



Wilts Obituary. 277 

Wells St., 1887—88 ; Vicar of Frocester (Gloucs.), 1888—1900 ; Vicar of 
Sherston, 1900—05 ; St. Andrew's Missioner, Sarum, 1905—09 and 
1910—13 ; Curate of Horsley (Gloucs.), 1909—10 ; Curate of St. James' 
Cathedral, Bury St. Edmunds, 1913 ; Hon. Chaplain to the Bp. of St. 
Edmunds, 1914. He was unmarried. He was much interested in 
topographical and genealogical matters, and was a careful and accurate 
worker. He was for some time one of the Local Secretaries of the 
Wilts Arch. Soc, and carried out most of the arrangements for the last 
meeting of the Society at Malmesbury. 

List of his Writings. 
An Illustrated Guide to the Parish Church of Sherston Magna, 
Wilts. Tetbury. Thomas Hill, Long Street. 1905. Pamphlet, 
8vo, pp. 23. Four illusts. Reviewed, Wilts Notes and Queries, vii., 48. 

The old Parsonage of Sherston Magna. Wilts Arch. Mag. ,xxxii., 

189—193. Two plates. 
Winterslow Church Reckonings. Ibid, xxxvi., 27—49. 
Chippenham Parish Church Register. The Clerk's Verses, 

1586. Wilts A. Sf Q., VL, 351—352. 
Five Ancient Deeds at Sherston Magna. Ibid, VI., 399—404 ; 

447—452. 
Sherston Manor Rolls. Ibid, VII., 173—179, 245—251, 298—303, 

370—373, 403—406, 486—492, 536—540 ; VIIL, 17—20, 88—93. 
The Memorandum Book of Thomas Gardiner of Tytherton 

Lucas. Ibid, VII, 60—65, 100—105, 147—152. 
Briefs in the Registers of Long Newnton. Ibid, VII., 431, 432. 
A Peodary of lands in Wilts. Ibid, VIIL, 328—331, 410—414, 

514—518. 
The Booke of Subscriptions 1663—1705. Suffolk Inst, XIII, 14—56. 

[He transcribed the Marriage Registers of Fugglestone and Bemerton 
in Wiltshire Parish Registers, Marriages, Vol. XII] 

Charles Morley, died suddenly, Oct., 1917, aged 70, at his residence, 
Shockerwick, near Bath. Buried at Bathford Cemetery. Third s. of 
Samuel Morley, M.P. Educated Trin. Coll., Camb., B.A. 1870, M.A. 
1874. Entered business of Messrs. I. & R. Morley, Wood Street, E.C., 
and became a partner. Retired from the business in 1888. Stood for 
East Somerset unsuccessfully 1892. M.P. for Brecknockshire 1895 — 
1906. J.P. for Berks, Somerset, and Wilts, and a regular attendant at 
Petty Sessions at Chippenham and Corsham. Much interested in 
philanthropic and educational work, he was for several years Chairman 
of the National Education Association. Hon. Sec. of Royal College 
of Music for 35 years. He took an active part in politics on the Liberal 
side in Bath and N.W. Wilts. He leaves a widow and three sons. 
Obit, notice, Wiltshire Gazette, Nov. 1st, 1917. 

Henry Charles Stephens, F.L.S, PCS., P.Gr.S., died 

July 8th, 1918, aged 77. Buried at Cholderton. B. 1841, eldest s. of 
Henry Stephens, M.R.C.S., of Finchley, Middlesex. Educated at 
Univ. Coll., London. For many years head of the firm of Stephens, 
ink manufacturers. M.P. for Hornsey (Unionist) 1887— 1900. In 1885 



278 Wilts Obituary. 

r .. he bought the Cholderton Lodge estate, where he subsequently lived. 
He greatly improved the condition of the estate and of the village, gave 
a village hall and recreation ground, and provided excellent cottages 
for the 80 or 90 men whom he employed. He was Well known as a 
progressive agriculturist, and more especially as a breeder of pedigree 
Horses, Cattle, Hampshire Down sheep and Tarn worth pigs. J. P. for 
Wilts, Middlesex, and Co. London. Married, 1862, Margaret Agnes, 
d. of George Mackreth, of Keyingham, Yorks. He leaves two sons 
and a daughter. 

Obit, notices, Wiltshire Gazette, July 11th and 18th; Times, July 
12th ; Salisbury Journal, July 13th, 1918. 

Rev. Henry Carew Palmer, died March nth, 1918, aged 83. 

Buried at St. Peter's, Bournemouth. Blundell Fellow of SS. Coll., 
Camb., B.A. 1856, M.A. 1859. Wells Theolog. Coll., 1856. Deacon, 
1857 ; priest, 1858, Sarum. Curate of Wootton Bassett, 1857—63 ; 
Vicar of Bowden Hill, 1863—80; Curate of Bradenham (Bucks), 1882 
—1889 ; of Filkins (Oxon), 1889—93, when he retired. He lived for 
some years at West Lavington and afterwards at Bournemouth. He 
married Vere, d. of Rev. T. H. Ripley, Vicar of Wootton Bassett, who 
survives him. 

James Sutherland Cotton, died July 9th, 1918, at Teffont, 

where he had lived for many years. B. July 17th, 1847, at Coonor, 
Madras. Third s. of Joseph John Cotton, of the Madras Civil Service. 
Educated Magdalen College School, Brighton College, Winchester, and 
Trin. Coll., Oxford. B.A. 1870. Fellow and Lecturer of Queen's Coll., 
Oxford, 1871—74. Called to Bar (Lincolns Inn), 1874, and joined the 
Western Circuit. Editor of the Academy 1881 — 96. He was especially 
interested in Indian matters and for many years assisted Sir William 
Hunter to compile the first General Gazetteer of India, 9 vols., 1881 ; 
the second edition of 14 vols, in 1885 — 87 ; and was the editor in 
England of the current " Imperial Gazetteer of India," 26 vols., 1907. He 
wrote two important official reports, the Decennial Review of Moral and 
MaterialProgress, 1883,and the Quinquennial Survey ofEducation, 1898. 
He wrote many of the articles on Indian subjects in "The Encyclopaedia 
Britannica," and the volume on " Mountstuart Elphinstone" in "The 
Rulers of India " Series. He also contributed to " Chambers' Encyclo- 
paedia" and the "Diet, of Nat. Biography." Of late years his chief 
work was the cataloguing of the European MSS. relating to India, in 
the India Office Library, not yet published. He did good work as 
hon. sec. of the Egypt Exploration Fund. He married, 1873, Isabella, 
d. of John Carter, of Clifton, who survives him. 

Obit, notices, Times ; Salisbury Journal, July 13th, 1918. 

Arthur Strattoil, killed by accident, at Woodborough Station, 
Sept. 4th, 1918, aged 56. Buried at Woodborough. Eldest s. of James 
Stratton, of Chilcombe, near Winchester. He farmed first at Wilsford, 
but for over 30 years had been at Alton Priors, where he farmed 3000 



Wilts Obituary. 279 

acres. Coming of a family famous in the history of Wiltshire farming, 
more especially for the breeding of cattle, his own bent was rather 
towards the mechanical methods of agriculture, and he owned himself 
six sets of double steam ploughing tackle. He was Vice-Chairman of 
the Steam Plough Development Association, President of the Devizes 
Branch of the National Farmers' Union, and of late had represented 
the Board of Agriculture at the County Appeal Tribunal, and was a 
member of the Wilts War Agricultural Committee. He started a 
Pioneer School for Land Women at Shaw. " It is not too much to say 
that he was the most prominent man in the County in the agricultural 
world." 

Obit, notices, Wiltshire Gazette, Sept. 5th and 12th, 1918. 

Charles Henry HalCOmfee, died at Bath, June, 1918, aged 87. 
S. of Thomas Halcombe, Mayor of Marlborough. Educated at Marl- 
borough Grammar 'School, and one of the earliest members of the 
College, which he entered in Feb., 1846. Pie lived at Leamington. 
Obit, notice, Wiltshire Gazette, July 4th, 1918. 

Joe SllOOke, died at Meckering, Western Australia, aged 76, 1918. 
Born in Pewsey Vale, 1842. S. of John Swallow Snooke, farmer and 
maltster. Emigrated to Queensland at the age of 20, engaged in sheep 
breeding and prospecting. When 27 he returned to England and took 
over the Manor Farm, Erchfont. Married, 1875, d. of James Crombley, 
of Wedhampton. Returned to Australia 1887, and settled in the 
Meckering district, W. Australia, where he prospered greatly as one 
of the earliest settlers, being largely instrumental in the development 
of the district. 

Obit, notice, West Australian, reprinted in Wiltshire Gazette, Oct. 
3lst, 1918. 

Capt. Eric L Bury, M.C., R.E., died Nov. 9th, 1918, of pneumonia, 
contracted at the Front. Only s. of Lindsay Bury, of Stanford Wood, 
Bradfield, formerly of Wilcot and Norton Bavant Manor. Educated 
at Eton and Trin. Coll., Oxford. B.A. 1914. On outbreak of war he 
enlisted as despatch rider and went to France in Aug., 1914, was 
mentioned in despatches, 1914, commissioned 1916, M.C. and Captain 

1917. Married Dolores, d. of Capt. Cyril Thornton, of Greenhili, 
Warminster, March, 1916. He leaves an infant son. 

Obit, notice, Wiltshire Gazette. Nov. 21st, 1918. 

Major Rowland Lowther, died of pneumonia in France, Nov., 

1918. Eldest s. of Edward Lowther. Educated Clifton College, en- 
tered his father's business, Messrs. Turner, Nott, & Co., joined 2nd/4th 
Gloucesters in 1 9 1 4, gained commission, transferred to A. S.C. Ma rried, 
1915, d. of W. Nichol Reid, of the " Western Daily Press. 

Obit, notice, Wiltshire Gazette, Nov. 21, 1918. 



280 



WILTSHIRE BOOKS, PAMPHLETS, 
AND ARTICLES. 

[N.B.-^-This list does not claim to be in any way exhaustive. The Editor 
appeals to all authors and publishers of pamphlets, books, or views, in 
any way connected with the county, to send him copies of their works, 
and to editors of papers, and members of the Society generally, to send 
him copies of articles, views, or portraits, appearing in the newspapers.] 

George Wyndham. Recognita. By Charles T. 
Gatty. With illustrations. London : John 
Murray, Albemarle Street, W. 1917. 

Cloth. 9in. x 5fin. Title and list of illusts. 2 leaves + 174 pp. Printed 
by the Leinster Leader Ltd., Naas, County Kildare, Ireland. Excellent 
photogravure portraits of George and Percy Wyndham, and six other 
illustrations. Not a biography, but a book of appreciations and 
recollections, written by a dear friend with the object of showing forth to 
others the rare charm of George Wyndham's personality and character, 
which had meant so much to himself. The two Wiltshire homes of 
Clouds and Wilsford come in for frequent mention in the book. A 
review in the Daily News, Oct. 4th, 1917, says : '' He was gloriously 
handsome as a man, and was one of those rare people who seem to 
adorn literature, politics, friendship, sport and life in general by their 
mere presence." 

Reviewed, Spectator, Oct. 27th, 1917. 

The Sayings of the Children, written down by their 
Mother, Pamela Glenconner, author of " Village 
Notes," 'The Children and the Pictures," "The 
Book of Peace," " Windlestraw," "The White 
Wallet" and "The Story of Joan of Arc." Oxford: 
B. H. Blackwell,, Broad Street, 1918. 

Buckram boards, 7^in. X 5|in. Titles, contents, list of illustrations, 
pp. unnumbered, 9 + 131. 1st edition, Feb., 1918. 2nd edition, March, 
1918. Six plates, portraits of "Wyndham, Clare, Christopher," "David," 
"Stephen," "Facsimiles of E. W. T.'s " Dedication " and "One of his 
Poems," and " The Nursery Balcony." 

A beautifully-printed and illustrated little book faithfully recording 
the sayings and doings .in early childhood, of a family, the most re- 
markable member of which, Edward Wyndham Tenriant, " Two," as 
he is called here, since fallen on the Somme, showed a curiously early 
gift of sentiment and poetical feeting, as a series of songs and poems 
" written between the age of four years old and nine," and printed at 
the end of the volume, show. 

Noticed, Times Lit. Suppt., March 28th, 1918. 



Wiltshire Books, Pamphlets, and Articles, 281 

The Home and the War. By Sophie K Sevan 
Loudon: John Murray. 1918. 

Paper boards, 7|in. X 5in. Pp. xvi. + 263. Frontispiece portrait 
of the author, and 13 illustrations of, or connected with, Littlecote, 
which is the " Home " of the title, 8 of them showing parts of the 
exterior of the house or the gardens. The author is a lady who, knowing 
her own mind extremely well, has evidently the knack of seeing that 
other people shall know it too. Having entered on the tenancy of 
Littlecote in the summer of 1914, the exigencies of the collapse of the 
Stock Exchange and the outbreak of war made it necessary that the 
place should be " run " on very different lines from the extravagant 
week-end methods of the previous peace time tenants. She at once 
made up her mind that she would really live there, and that unnecessary 
expenses must be ruthlessly cut down, and that the whole staff of 
" retainers " must become productive workers. The most entertaining 
part of the book is her very lively account of the manner in which she 
tackled the 18 gamekeepers and reduced their number to 6, whilst she 
talked like a mother to the gardeners of military age until they incon- 
tinently enlisted. The disused laundry became a butter and cheese 
factory, the Borzois were expelled from the dog kennels, and their 
place taken by goats. Expert advisers told her that it was impossible 
to make cheese from Jersey cows, but she determined to keep Jerseys 
aud no others and made excellent cheese in spite of their prognosti- 
cations. Only once was she worsted in her scheme of reform, and that 
was in her encounter with " Old Jerry," who had worked for 50 years 
atLittlecote and declining altogether to be either retrenched or reformed, 
continues, one gathers, to sweep up leaves and wheel his barrow as of 
old. The Wild Darrell legend is of course dwelt upon and some short 
account of the house itself is given, but the object of the book is to 
encourage productive industries of all kinds, more especially in con- 
nection with large country houses, both during and after the war. 
There are, therefore, sections on goat, rabbit, and pig keeping, on 
dairying, and the intensive culture of vegetables, on war time in country 
districts, and the effect of the war on housekeeping, on the evils of 
absentee landlords and paper currency, both of which should be got 
rid of as soon as possible, together with the present dogmas, doctrines, 
and services of the Church of England, which must give place to a new 
religion which shall direct the "power of thought" in the right channels 
for the people of the 20th century. This, with protection for agriculture, 
decimal coinage, universal military training, and an infusion of common 
sense into the Government, should see us safely launched in the new 
world after the war. 

Reviewed, Wiltshire Gazette, Nov. 7th, 1918. 

A Poet's Pilgrimage. By W. H. Davies, author of 
" The Autobiography of a Super-Tramp." London : 
Andrew Melrose, Ltd., 3, York Street, Covent 
Garden, WC 1918. 



282 Wiltshire Boohs, Pamphlets, and Articles. 

— Cloth, cr. 8vo, pp., including title, 378. This contains the story of 
a Walk from Carmarthen to Maidenhead, of which p. '281 to p. 333 are 
^concerned with the journey across Wiltshire from Chippenham to 
Hungerford, or rather, with the account of what the tramps whom the 
author met at each stage of the walk said and did and drank, and what 
he said and gave to them. 



a 



Our Grand Old Wiltshire Downs." By Reuben 

George. Art. in Wiltshire Advertiser, June 20th, 1918, describing 
visit of the Swindon Workers' Educational Association to Upper Upham . 

"An Address to the Swindon Branch of the Workers' 

Educational Association, given on October 28th, 1916, by 
Robert Bridges. Oxford University Press. 1916." In wrapper, 6d. 
net. Art cloth, Is. 6 d. net. 

Salisbury, South Wilts, and Blackmore Museums, 

"~ r Annual Report for 1916 — 17. Salisbury Journal, July 
r 28th, 1917. Mentions especially the valuable collection of English and 
Oriental China just added to the Museum by the Wilkes bequest. 

Ditto, Report for 1917.— 18. The record for this year is one of 
much progress. The Wilkes bequest, by the death of Mrs. Wilkes, has 
now come into the possession of the Museum, and dividends to the 
amount of £408 have already been received from it. Admirable work 
has been done by the curator, Mr. F. Stevens, F.S.A., in the re-organi- 

' " zation of the collection of birds, a large number of cases having been 
entirely re-arranged and newly set up by him. The educational work 
of the year, too, has been greatly extended. Three series of lectures to 
school children, as well as two " Study Circles " and a " Teachers' Class " 
for adults have been in operation. The very large collection of china 
coming to the M useum by the W ilkes bequest cannot (with the exception 
; of a very few pieces) be at present exhibited for want of room. 

Report of the Marlborough Coll. Nat Hist. Soc for 
year ending Christmas, 1917 No. 66 

The usual reports and lists of the various sections are given, showing 
good work as usual, but no very sensational new discoveries. Photo- 
graphs of the rood loft at Avebury and of the interior of Mildenhall 
Church are given. 

Gatalogue of the Renowned Collection of Autograph 
Letters and Historical Manuscripts formed by 
the late Alfred Morrison, Esq ., of Fonthill, and 
now the property of Mrs. Alfred Morrison. The 

First Portion, including the Letter written by Mary, Queen of 
Scots on the night before her execution ; the Letter in" which Oliver 
Cromwell describes the Battle of Marston Moor ; many.letters of great 
French and American historical interest; superb letters of Queen 






Wiltshire Books, Pamphlets, and Articles, 2§3 

Elizabeth, Henry VIII., Charles I., Burns, Byron, Defoe, Keats, etc. ; 
and the Hamilton — Nelson correspondence, which will be sold by 
auction by Messrs. Sotheby, Wilkinson, & Hodge . . . at -their 
large galleries, 34 and 35, New Bond Street, W. (1), on Monday, the 
10th of December, 1917, and four following days. . . . London : 
Strange ways & Sons, Printers, Tower Street, Cambridge Circus, W.C. 2." 

Sewed, royal 8vo, pp., title, &c, 2 + 119. Twelve photo plates of 
letters. 

The collection comprised 770 lots, which realised a total of £12,606, 
exclusive of the Letter of Mary, Q. of Scots,which was bought privately 
and presented to the nation. The Connoisseur, Feb., 1918, p. 105, gives 
some of the principal prices paid. The Hamilton — Nelson correspon- 
pondence of 1050 letters and documents, £2500; Charlotte Bronte 
letters, £108 ; Cervantes, £270 ; Charles I., after Naseby, £160 ; Crom- 
well describing Marston Moor, £300, and two others, £200 and £195 ; 
Defoe, £155, Q. Elizabeth, £115 and £150 ; James I. to Mary Q. of. 
Scots, £210; John Knox to Calvin, £220; Las Casas, £145 ; Martin 
Luther, £105; Burns, £220, £150, £125, and £100; Description of 
Byron's death, by his valet, £107. 

Catalogue of the Renowned Collection of Autograph 
Letters and Historical Manuscripts formed by 
the late Alfred Morrison, Esq., of Fonthill, and 
now the property of Mrs. Alfred Morrison. 
Second portion, comprising Three Holograph 
Letters of Mary, Queen of Scots . . . sold by 
auction by Messrs. Sotheby, Wilkinson, & Hodge, 
15th April, 1918, and four following days 

Royal 8vo. Title, 1 leaf + pp. 121 to 290. 

The total of this sale was £15,009. Three Mary Stuart letters sold for 
£360, £345, and £115 ; two letters of Napoleon I. for £435 and £150 ; 
of Rabelais, for £270 and £110 ; Rembrandt, £180 ; Emerico Vespucci, 
£390 ; Geo. Washington, £ 1 52 ; Burns, £200 ; £145, £120 ; Byron, £320 ; 
Catherine de Medicis, £300; Cromwell (8), £374; Defoe, £195; 
Goldsmith, £265 ; Keats, £205 ; Charles Lamb (a number), £484 ; 
Voltaire, £200. 

Catalogue of the Famous Library of Printed Books, 
Illuminated Manuscripts, Autograph Letters, 
and Engravings, collected by Henry Huth, and 
since maintained and augmented by his son Alfred 
H. Huth, Fosbury Manor, Wiltshire. The Printed 
Books and Illuminated Manuscripts. Seventh 
Portion. . . . Messrs. Sotheby. ... 1st 
July, 1918, and four following days, and 8th 
July and following day . . . 



284 Wiltshire Books, Pamphlets, and Articles. 

Paper covers. Royal 8vo, pp, 1727 to 1976. Coloured frontispiece 
of illumination, 1 coloured plate of binding, and 14 plates of title pages, 
&c. The total realised by the sale was £30,118 15s. 6d. t an average of 
£30 per lot. 

[North Wilts Estates of the Earl of Pembroke]. 

Particulars of Sale ... The " Manor " Farm and " Chink " Farm, 
Lea, " Street " Farm, Cleverton, impropriate tithe rent charge in Lea 
and Cleverton Parish, also nearly the whole of the Parish of Stanton 
St. Bernard . . . advowson of the living of Stanton St. Bernard 
and the advowson of North Newnton ; West Overto^Farm .... 
a portion of the West Woods, and Overton Heath Farm .... 
about 3560 acres. Ferris & Puckridge.— Instructions from the Earl of 
Pembroke. King's Arms Hotel, Malmesbury, June 27th, 1917 . . . 
Bear Hotel, Devizes . . . June 28th. 

Folio. Pp., including title, 30. Five folding coloured plans in pocket, 
of Lea & Cleverton, Lea Village, Overton, Stanton St. Bernard (2). 

Particulars of . . the Rushall Estate . . . 

in the parishes of Woodborough, Beechingstoke, Manningford Bohune, 
North Newnton, Rushall, and Charlton . . . 4600 acres . . . 
Sale by auction . . . Bear Hotel, Devizes, 25th July, 1917. By 
direction of the Earl of Normanton. 

Folio. Pp., including title, 69. Key plan and 4 plates, with good 
photos of Church Farm, Manor House, and The Laurels, Woodborough ; 
Manor Farm and Dairy Farm, Manningford ; Manor House, Beeching- 
stoke ; The Cottage, Rushall, and Rushall House. Five coloured plans 
in pocket. The total realised was £75,000. In the advertisement in 
Country Life, June 23rd, 1917, a photo of Cuttenham Farm was also 
given. 

Souvenir and Guide Book for the Australian and 
New Zealand Soldiers encamped on Salisbury 
Plain and in the district. Compiled by W. E 
Bennett, Bennett Brothers, Salisbury, 1917. 

Pamphlet, 8vo. Pp., including title, 36. Price, Is. Fourteen photo 
illustrations : No. I. Y.M.C.A. Hut, Larkhill ; The Busy Hour,Y.M.C.A. 
Canteen, Larkhill; Major-Gen. Monash; Review of Australian and 
New Zealand Troops by the King on Salisbury Plain, Sept. 27th, 1916 ; 
The King, &c, at the Saluting Base ; Flags of the Tunneling Corps of 
5th Aust, Royal Engineers, and 43rd Batt., Aust. Infantry, in Salisbury 
Cathedral ; Stonehenge, View and Restoration ; Salisbury Cathedral \ 
J. Macklin, Mayor of Salisbury ; Council House, Salisbury ; Guest 
House, The Canal ; Soldiers' Club, High St. This is a well-compiled 
pamphlet with short but sufficient notes on the various matters set forth 
in the illustrations. Mr. Frank Stevens, who writes the note on 
Stonehenge, makes the interesting suggestion that the sarsen stones 
"were probably floated down the river from North Wilts; one of the 
stones may yet be seen lying in the bed of the river near Bulford, just 
as it fell off its raft." 



Wiltshire Books, Pamphlets, and Articles. 285 

Seend Monumental Inscriptions. By Arthur 

Schomberg * The Genealogist, Oct., 1917, N.S., vol. xxxiv., Part 
II., pp. 74—80, contains abstracts of the wills of William Tipper, of 
Seend, 1641 ; of John Awdry, Junior, of Melksham, Clerk, 1637 ; and 
of John Awdry, Senior, Vicar of Melksham, 1638. There is a plate of 
the mural monument in the Church at Seend, to the Tipper and Somner 
families. 

Sheep on the Wiltshire Downs. Mr. Allan G-. 
Youngs Farm at Watergate House, Bulford 

Art. in Agricultural Gazette, Jan. 14th, 1918, pp. 36—38, describing Mr. 
Young's farming operations on a large scale at Bulford : with a portrait, 
three photos of Exmoor Sheep, and another of the Dung-spreader. 

Roger, Bishop of Salisbury, Chancellor and Justiciar 
of England, 1102— 1139. compiled by W. H. 

Butcher. Journ. Brit. Arch. Assoc, N.S., vol. xxiii., Dec, 1917, 
pp. 124—136. A useful statement of what is known about Bishop 
Roger, compiled from various chronicles and other published sources. 

Saxon Coin minted at Malmesbury . A short note on a coin 

in the possession of the Vicar, the Rev. C. D. McMillan, is printed in 
Journ. of Brit. Arch. Assoc, N.S., vol. xxiii., Dec, 1917, p. 189, in which 
it is stated. on the authority of the British Museum that it is a penny 
of Edward the Confessor. Reading : — Qbv. Edpwar Recx 

Rev. Hvnna om Mea 
"Mea"=Mealmesbylig. Hvnna, the coiner is an unpublished name. 

Hurdcott Herald. Produced by permission of the 
Camp Commandant, lit -Col. T. Flintoff. No. 16. 
Hurdcott, 23rd March, 1918. Price Twopence. 

Pamphlet, 7± X 5. Pp. 211—230 (No. 19, 11th May, 1918) A 
periodical printed by the Salisbury Press, Salisbury, for the Australian 
Camp at Hurdcott, in Baverstock parish. Only a few numbers were 
published. It contains various short articles, poems, and information 
as to matters connected with the camp, aud has a comic drawing on 
the title page and three photo plates : — '* No. 3 Command Depot Band," 
"Aeroplane down on Hurdcott Front," and "A Party of Entertainers." 

Wiltshire Prisons, The "County Gaol" had long existed at 
Salisbury, on the W. side of river at Fisherton Bridge, where the Clock 
Tower now stands. Early in the 19th century this building was found 
to be inconvenient and unhealthy, and a new gaol was built on higher 
ground at some distance. At Devizes the "New Prison" had been 
erected in 1810, and some twenty years later the earlier Bridewell in 
the street still bearing that name was converted into a central police 
station. At Marlborough there was a Bridewell which ceased to be 
used in 1853. Both the Fisherton and Devizes Prisons were in full use 
when the question of prison treatment and discipline in connection 



286 Wilts! tire Books, Pamphlets, and Articles, 

with the Prison Act passed in 1865 first came before the Wiltshire 
justices at the June sessions of 1864, and at tlfe January sessions of 
1866 notice of a motion to discontinue the use of Fisherton Gaol was 
given. The debate on this resolution began at Devizes sessions in Jan., 
1867, and the vote in its favour took place in April of the same year. 
Nevertheless the question still continued to afford subject of debate, 
until the last prisoner was removed to Devizes on January 1st, 1870. 
In 1912 an order of the Home Office ordained that convicted prisoners 
should no longer serve their sentences at Devizes, and on the 3rd Feb. 
of that year the prisoners were removed to Shepton Mallet Gaol. The 
history of these transactions is excellently set forth in a paper, " Wiltshire 
Prisons : The Last Days," in the Wiltshire Gazette, Sept. 26th and Oct. 
3rd, 1918, by Mr. R. W. Merriman, ex-Clerk of the Peace for the county. 

XjclCOCk An article in The Christian Science Monitor of August 13th, 
1918, describing the village, with an illustration of the cross, is noted 
in Wiltshire Times, September 23rd, 1918. 

Salisbury and Fielding. In Notes and Queries, 12 Ser., III., 
Nov., 1917, pp. 466 — 468, Mr. J. Paul de Castro, in a paper on, 
"Fieldingiana," discusses the identification of characters in u 2bm Jones " 
with well-known persons in Salisbury, and disputes the accuracy of 
that identification in Benson & Hatcher's Hist, of Salisbury (p. 602). 
He also gives various particulars of the family of Charlotte Cradock, of 
Salisbury, Fielding's first wife, and on the authority of the late Mr. 
T. H. Baker locates the house of Lady Gould where Fielding spent his 
holidays when at Eton, as in St. Martin's Church Street. 

History of the "Wiltshire Advertiser," reprinted from 

Wilts Arch. Mag., in Wiltshire Advertiser, Jan. 24th, 1918. 

Sarsen Stone as a Material for Road Making, a 

letter from Mr. Mark Jeans, accompanied by a detailed report on the 
advantages of Sarsen over Mountain Limestone as a road material, by 
R. E. Crompton, Consulting Engineer. Wiltshire Advertiser, Feb. 21st, 
1918. 

Sir Richard Colt Hoar e as Gardener. Sir R. C. Hoare's 

reputation as an archseologist has caused the fact that he was also a 
notable gardener to be forgotten. Some extracts from the journal of 
the Rev. John Skinner, Rector of Camerton, a constant visitor to 
Stourhead, printed in Wiltshire Times, May 25th, 1918, especially 
mention, in May, 1822, the collection of greenhouse Geraniums,which 
then consisted of " upwards of 500 distinct varieties." 

The Rt. Hon. W. H. Long. An article on "The Time-defying 
Mr. Long," by E. T. Raymond, in Everyman, is reprinted in Wiltshire 
Times, May 25th, 1918. 



Wiltshire Books, Pamphlets, mid Articles. 287 

Thomas Hinton, of Chilton Park. The Wiltshire Times of 

July 20th, 1918, prints an interesting account of the evidence of Thomas 
Hinton at Abingdon Assizes, proving the imposture of Ann Gunter, of 
North Morton (Berks), who had accused Elizabeth Gregory and others 
of bewitching her. 

[Mere] From Manchester to Mere. By P. R. An 

article in The Wheatsheaf, Aug., 1917, pp. 19—22. Three illustrations 
in text, one being a view of Mere from the Castle Hill. An article. on 
Co-operative Societies. 

The Soul of Susan TTellam. A Record. By Horace 
Annesley Vachell. Cassell, 1918. 

7fiu. x 5in. Pp. 300. 7s. net. A novel, the scene of which is laid 
in Wiltshire, near Salisbury, but there is no special local colouring. 
Reviewed Times Literary Supplement, Sept. 12th, 1918. It appeared 
serially in The Quiver, 1918. 

Ape's Face, By Marion Fox. John Lane. 1916, 

6s. A story dealing with the prehistoric spirits of the Wiltshire Downs. 

Highways and Byways in Wiltshire. By Ed. Hutton, 

1917. Long review in Wiltshire Gazette, Jan. 3rd, 1918. 

The 62nd or Wiltshire Regiment. The Wiltshire Times 

has printed from time to time interesting notes on the past history of 
the Regiment. The recruiting of Germans for the regiment in 1776, 
and its three years' captivity in America are described July 14th, 1917 ; 
the recruiting of Ulstermen and its surrender to the French at Carrick- 
fergus in Feb., 1760, Aug. 11th, 1917; a number of incidents in its 
history during the 18th and early 19th centuries, Sept. 29th, 1917 ; 
further notes on the Regiment in America, 1776 — 1781, Nov. 24th, 1317. 

A Petition of Edward Yerbury, Jim, respecting property at 

Trowbridge in the time of the Commonwealth, is partly printed in 
Wiltshire Times, July 28th, 1917. 

Edward SlOW. " The Great War, a West Countrie Dialogue between 
Fred & Mark, Soldier & Pacifist. By the author of the Wiltshire 
Rhymes & Tales. Price Ninepence net. Salisbury : R. R. Edwards, 
Castle Street. Wilton : Miss Winters, West Street." [1918.] 

Pamphlet, 6iin X 4in. Pp.. including title, 26. A set of dialect 
verses in Mr. Slow's well-known manner, including two shorter pieces* 
" A Leetle Willshere War Ditty" and "A Wilts Zodger's Zong." 

Wiltshire Notes & Queries, No. 96, Dec, 1916. 

This number, which completes Vol. VIII., appeared more than a year 
late. It contains the index to the volume printed in a much more 
condensed form than in previous volumes, and with nothing given 
beyond the name of person or place, but within these limits, imposed 
doubtless by present costs of printing, every name mentioned in the 



288 Books, Pamphlets, and Articles by Wiltshire Authors. 

volume seems to be duly given. Mr. Kite has a note on Joan Sumner,' of 
Seend; " William Stumpe, of Malmesbury, his descendants and rela- 
tives," is continued ; the will of John Stone, Vicar of Aldbourne, is 
printed ; " Wiltshire Wills in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury" is 
continued. A Terrier of Box Vicarage in 1677, and a list of ad- 
missions of Freemen to the Drapers' Guild of Devizes, 1614 — 1730, are 
the other principal items in the number. 



BOOKS, PAMPHLETS, AND' AETICLES BY 
WILTSHIRE AUTHOES. 

Sir Henry Newbolt (of Netherhampton). "Tales of the Great 
War. Longmans. 1916." 6s. net. 

" The Book of the Happy Warrior. By Henry Newbolt. 

Longmans. 1917." 8in. X 5iin., pp. xiv., + 284. 6s. net. Eight 
colour plates and 25 other illustrations by Hen. J. Ford. Tales of 
chivalry and personal service. Reviewed, Times Lit. Suppt., Dec. 13th, 
1917. 

"The Soldier's Faith, a Ballad of Sir Pertab Singh." 

Times, Aug. 17th, 1918. 

"St. George's Day and other Poems. Murray. 1918." 

3s. 6c?. net. Reviewed, Times Lit. Suppt. , Sept. 26th, 1918. 

Maurice Hewlett (of Broad Chalke). " The Village Wife's Lament. 
By Maurice Hewlett." Martin Seeker. 1918. 

7fin. X 5£in., pp. 63. 3s. Qd. net. Reviewed, Times Lit. Suppt., 
Sept. 12th, 1918. 

Gudrid the Fair. By Maurice Hewlett. Constable. 1918. 

7|in. x 5in., pp. xiv. -f 264. 6s. net. A poem. Reviewed, Times 

- Lit. Suppt., Sept. 26th, 1918. 

Richard C. Lambert, M.P. (Cricklade Div.). "The Parlia- 
mentary History of Conscription in Great Britain (1918)." A Summary 
of the Parliamentary Debates, &c, with Index and a Preface by R. C. 
Lambert. Demy 8vo. 5s. net. 

Godfrey IiOCker-Iiamp Son, M.P. (Salisbury). "Oratory, 
British and Irish. The Great Age (from the Accession of George the 
Third to the Reform Bill, 1832). Edited with notes by Godfrey 
Locker-Lampson, M.P. A. L. Humphreys. 1918." 



Books, Pamphlets, and Articles by Wiltshire Authors. 289 

Eustace P. Bosanquet (Steeple Ashton). "English Printed 
Almanacks and Prognostications. A Bibliographical History to the 
year 1600. By Eustace F. Bosanquet. London : Printed for the 
Bibliographical Society at the Chiswick Press. 1917." 

4to, cloth, pp. xi. -f 204. Thirty-four pages of facsimiles. A most 
laborious and scholarly work, beautifully printed. 

— —^ — "The Manuscript of 'William Dunche, being the Book of 
the New Ordinary of the King's Most Honourable Household, anno 31 
Henry VIII. Transcripts edited with notes by A. G. W. Murray, M. A., 
and Eustace F. Bosanquet. Reprinted for private circulation. Exeter : 
William Pollard & Co., Ltd. 1914." 

Cloth, royal 8vo, pp. 6 -f 74. Reprinted from The Genealogist, N.S., 
Vols. XXIX. and XXX. Avebury Priory was granted to Will. Dunch, 
of Little Wittenham (Berks), 1556. He died May 11th, 1597. An 
abstract of his will, with an account of his brass at Little Wittenham 
Church, are given in this volume. 

Very favourably reviewed, Times Lit, Suppt., Jan. 3rd, 1917. 

Colin Mitchell (Rifle Brigade) [of Mere]. "Trampled Clay. By 
'Colin Mitchell (Rifle Brigade). Erskine Macdonald, Ltd.,' Malory 
House, Featherstone Buildings, London, W.C. 1." 

Sewed, 7in. x 4|in., pp., including titles, dedication, and contents, 47. 
, First published Nov., 1917. Twenty War Poems. 

T. Geoffrey W. HenslOW (s. of the late Rector of Zeals ; and 
sometime Rector of Stanton St. Quintin). " Early Poems by T. Geoffrey 
W. Henslow, M.A. (Second Lieutenant 4th Argyll and Sutherland 
Highlanders). London : The Gentlewoman Ltd., Long Acre : 105. 6d." 
Three hundred poems, many of which were published in the Wiltshire 
Gazette, illustrated by Miss Dorothy Hartley. White vellum, gilt 
uncut margins, ornamental devices on each page. Noticed Wiltshire 
Gazette, April 26th, 1917. 

The Rev. J. Gill Ward (Vicar of Avebury). u The World Drama 
in Revelation and History. By the Rev. J. Gill Ward, M.A., L. Th., 
formerly Solicitor of the Supreme Court. London : Elliot Stock, 7, 
Paternoster Row, E.C. 4. 1917." 

Cloth, cr. 8vo, pp., title and preface, 4 pp., unnumbered + 202. 6*. 
net. A series of 26 sermons interpreting the Book of the Revelation in 
reference to present events. 

Noticed, Wiltshire Gazette, Jan. 10th, 1318. 

Cllve Bell (s. of W. Heward Bellf of Seend). "Potboilers." Chatto 
"'■■ & Windus. 6s. net. A series of essays on art. Reviewed at length, 
Times Lit, Suppt., July 18th, 1918. 

Lady POOre. " Georgina Lloyd." A short story in Cornhill Mag., 

Aug., 1918, No. 704, pp. 167—179. 
VOL. XL.— NO. CXXIX. Y 



290 Boohs, Pamphlets, and Articles by Wiltshire Avthors. 

"JohH AyscOUgh" (of Winterbourne Gunner). "Jacqueline. By 

L John Ayscough. London : Chatto & Windus. 1918." 

^ Cloth, cr. 8vo, pp., including title and dedication to.Frank Bickerstaffe- 

Drew, vi. + 1 page contents + 312. Printed by Billing & Sons, 

Guildford. A novel. Reviewed, Times Lit Suppt., March 28th, 1918. 

" French Windows. Arnold. 1917." 5s. net. Experiences 

of a Chaplain at the Front. Noticed, Times Lit. Suppt., April 26th, 
1817. 

Jane Harding (of Salisbury). " The Puppet. T. Fisher Unwin, Ltd., 
Adelphi Terrace, London." In Fisher Unwin's " First Novel Series." 
6s. net. Noticed, Salisbury Journal, Oct. 13th, 1917. 

Rev. E. E. Dorling. " Regiments at a Glance. By E. E. Dorling 
M.A., F.S.A. Illustrated with 4 coloured plates and 138 regimental 
badges. Second Edition. London : George Philip & Son, Limited, 
32, Fleet Street. Liverpool : Philip, Son, & Nephew, Ltd , 20, Church 
Street, 1917." 

7£in. x 4|in., stiff paper cover, pp., including title, 127. Half a page 
of letterpress, giving history of each regiment with cuts of their badges. 
On the cover, "A Handbook of Regimental Badges & Traditions." 
2s. net. 

Canon Edward Russell Bernard. "The Secret Things of 

- God. Sermon preached in Salisbury Cathedral, Sept. 8th, 1918." Text 
Deut., xxix., 29. Printed in Guardian, Sept. 12th, 1918. 

Canon E. P. Knubley (Vicar of Steeple Ashton). " The Origin of 

\Tithe on Land.''' Art. in The Treasury, Aug., 1918, pp. 355—358, 

arguing that the origin of tithe is to be found in the setting apart of 

the tenth acre in the common fields of the Saxon village communities 

for the service of the Church. 

A Wilton Lady's Impressions of Australians. Pro- 
ceeds for Soldiers' " Comfort " Fund. One 
Penny. 

Pamphlet, crown 8vo, pp., including title, 7. Printed at the Wilton 
and Tisbury Printing Works, Ltd., North St., Wilton. A reprint from 
the Brisbane Daily Mail, January 6th, 1917, of a letter from Miss B. L. 
Uphill, of West Street, Wilton, in appreciation of the Australians 
trained on Salisbury Plain, thousands of whom she had shown over 
Amesbury Church, where for ten months she attended every afternoon 
for this purpose. 

Brig-Gen. P. G. Stone, CM.G. "Eighteen Months with the 
New Armies." The Nineteenth Century, Oct., 1916, pp. 881—892. 

■ " King Constantine of Greece and Frederick William III. 

of Prussia : a Parallel ? " Ibid, Nov., 1916, pp. 931—938. 



Boohs. Pamphlets, and Articles by Wiltshire Authors. | :29 1 

Brig -Gren P, G. Stone, C.M.G-. "Leagues to enforce Peace.._Ari 
Illusion of To-day." Ibid, March, 1917, pp. 700—708. 

"At War with the German People." Ibid, Aug., 1917, 

pp. 221—233. 

"The Abolition of Party Government." Ibid, No. 494, 

April, 1918, pp. 744—761. 

Rev. T. J. Lawrence, LLD. Rector of Upton LoveL "the 
effect of the War on International Law. Reprint from ' Scientia,' Vol. 
XXI. June, 1917. Bologna." Pamphlet. Large 8vo, pp. 11. 

Rev. R. B. de Bary (Vicar of Imber). " The Religion of the English 
Rustic since the Reformation," a paper read before the Warminster 
Clerical Society. Printed in full in The Commonwealth, Novr r 19l6, 
pp. 340—343. 

Mrs. Fawcett. " The War as a Schoolmaster." An address to the 
Salisbury and District Branch of the National Union of Teachers. 
May 19th, 1917. Printed in full in Salisbury Journal, May 26th, 1917. 

Rev. J. P. Wiles. "Sermons preached by Mr. J. P. Wiles, M.A., 
Pastor of the Old Baptist Chapel, Devizes." A large number of ser- 
mons, each printed as a separate 8vo pamphlet, preached at Devizes. 
from 1906 to 1916. 

Canon C T. Pi 1110 lit, Principal of Sarum Theological College. 
Sermon preached in Salisbury Cathedral, Dec. 9th, 1917. Text Ps. xi.,3. 
On the proposed extension of Divorce facilities. Printed in full in 
Salisbury Diocesan Gazette, January, 1918. 

H. E. MedliCOtt. "The Prussians in France in 1871." A descrip- 
tive sketch of a tour made in France in 1871. Printed after his death 
in Wiltshire Gazette, Oct. 19th and 26th, 1916. 

Very Rev. W. Page Roberts, Dean of Salisbury. 

Sermon preached in Salisbury Cathedral, at the Commemoration of 
Benefactors, Nov. 6th, 1917. Text, Neh., viii., 2. Printed in full in 
Salisbury Diocesan Gazette,Dec, 1917. 

- Sermon preached in Salisbury Cathedral, May 13th, 1917. 

Text John, vi., 12. Against waste. Printed in full in Salisbury 
Journal, May 19th, 1917. 

Miss Helen A'CPenruddOCke, F.R.Cr.S. " Japanese Flower 
Groups." Article in Japanese Section of the Times, Oct. 14th, 1916, 
with four cuts, describing the Japanese system of arranging flowers in 
vases. 

Ven. R Stewart, Archdeacon of North Wilts. 

Charge at Visitations at Chippenham, Malmesbury, and Swindon. 
Printed in full in Wiltshire Gazette, April 26th, 1917. 

Y 2 



292 Books, Pamphlets, and Artieles-by Wiltshire Authors* 

Rev. A. H. T. Clarke (Rector of Devizes), Sermon preached at 
St. John's, Devizes, Dec. 9th, 1917, on Lord Lansdowne's letter. Text. 
Rom., xv., 4. Printed in full in Wiltshire Gazette, Dec. 13th, 1917. 

~— — — ; — The Allies' Assurance of Victory ; a Historical Parallel." 
The Nineteenth Century, May, 1918, pp. 1077—1087. 

Ven. E, J. Boding ton, Archdeacon of Wilts. Sermon 

peached at Oalne, Nov. 26th, 1916. Printed in full in Wiltshire Gazette, 
Nov. 23rd, 1916. 

— Sermon preached at St. John's Church, Devizes, Feb. 1 1 th, 

Printed in full in Wiltshire Gazette, Feb. 15th, 1917. 

— "The Parson and the Plough." A series of anonymous 

articles on the advantages to the clergy of national service on the land, 
&c, in The Challenge, January 19th, March 30th, 1917. 

— " The Fight against the Lion and the Dragon." Sermon 

preached in Calne Church, on Aug. 5th, 1917, on the Dedication of a 
Window to the memory of Lord Charles Mercer Nairne. Printed in 
full in Wiltshire Gazette, Aug. 16tb, 1917. 

Rt. Rev. P. E. Ridgeway, D.D, (Bishop of Salisbury). Address 
at the Synod, Salisbury, 1917. Printed in full in Wiltshire Gazette, 
Oct. 25th, 1917. Ditto, 1918. Report of the Proceedings at the Synod. 
Supplement to Salisbury Diocesan Gazette, Nov., 1918. 

Amy J. Baker (Mrs. Maynard Crawford), "Dear Yesterday. 
Long. 1917." A story of the Transvaal. 6s. 

Prof. J. H. Morgan (Wootton Bassett). "Leaves from a Field 
Note Book. 1915." 5s. net. 

— — Articles " By Centurion." " A Day on the Somme,' 

Country Life, Nov., 1916. " Field Punishment," Land and Water, 
Nov. 30th, 1916. "No Man's Land," Ibid. Dec. 28th, 1916. "The 
Lieutenant," Ibid, Feb. 8th, 1917. " Herr Leutnant." Ibid, Feb. 22nd, 
1917. "The Batman," Ibid, March 8th, 1917. " The Attack," Ibid 
March 29th, 1917, "The Lost Platoon, Ibid, April 26th, 1917. "Drafts," 
Ibid, May 10th, 1917. The Crown of Thorns, Ibid, June 7th, 1917. 
"The A.P.M." Ibid, July 5th, 1917. "A Farm in Flanders," Ibid. 
Aug. 2nd. 1917. "The A.P.M. again," Ibid, Aug. 23rd, 1917. "The 
Husbandman," Ibid. Sept. 13th, 1917. ''The Sower of Tares,".i6^, 
Oct. 11th, 1917. "The Tide of Battle," Ibid, Nov., 8th, 19,17. 
"The Old Guard," Ibid. Dec. 13th, 1917. " Hot Air," Ibid, Dec. 28th, 
1917. " The Husbandman. II.," Ibid, Jan. 17th, 1918. "The Allies," 
Ibid, March 21st, 1918. " Education of the Soldier," Ibid, May 2nd, 1918. 

~ — " Gentlemen at Arms. By Centurion. London. William 

Heinemann." [1918.] - 



John 



Wiltshire Illustrations. 293 

Linen, l\m. X 4fin., pp., including titles, contents,and list of ab- 
breviations, xii. + 274. 6s. net. Dedicated " to the Duke of Cornwall's 
Light Infantry, the Dorsets, the Somerset Lightlnfantry, the Wiltshires, 
the Devons." Twenty stories which appeared in Land and Water, 
based on the author's experiences of the war when serving in France. 
Several of the stories have a connection withWiltshire or Wiltshiremen. 

Noticed, Times Lit. Suppt., Aug. 1st, 1918. 



WILTSHIRE ILLUSTRATIONS, 

Compton Chamberlayne. The carved woodwork at Compton Park is 

illustrated in three good photos of The Mantelpiece and N. and S. 

Doorways of the Dining Room, at pp. 234 — 237 of " Grinling Gibbons 

and the Woodwork of His Age,— 1648— 1720." By H. Avray Tipping, 

1914. 
Set of Three (Wagon) Bells from Wiltshire, photo in Paper on Wagon 
i:. Bells in Connoisseur, April, 1916. 
Bowood. "Italian Gardens and Orangery" and "Dining Room." Two 

photo illustrations from Robert Adam and his Brothers, by John 

Swarbrick, are given in the Burlington Mag., April, 1916, in a notice 

of the book, 
Mr. W. M. Hughes addressing Australian Troops on Salisbury Plain. Photo, 

Queen, July 1st, 1916. 
Constable's Old Sarum. Queen, July 22nd, 1916. 
Marlburians Haymaking. Two photos, Country Life, July 15th, 1916. 
Scenes on the Wylye Trout and Grayling River in Wiltshire. Two photos, 

Sporting and Dramatic Neivs, July 29th, 1916. 
Men of the Wiltshire Regiment. Queen, Sept. 2nd, 1916. 
Wounded Wiltshires from the Tigris. Wiltshire Gazette, Sept. 7th, 1916. 
The Old Tithe Barn, Bradford-on-Avon. Photo, Connoisseur, Sept., 1916, 

p. 57. 
Devizes "Navvy Brigade." Fathers, Mothers, Sons, and Daughters building 

a New Roadway. Four photos, Daily Mirror, Sept. 1st, 1916. 
Happy Moonraker Sailor Lads. Photo, Wiltshire Times, Oct. 14th, 1916. 
Salisbury Plain. The King at Review of Australian and New Zealand 

Troops. Photo, Queen, Oct. 7th, 1916. 
[Bowood,] Lord Lansdowne's Beautiful Country Seat as a Military 

Hospital, Wounded Soldiers in the Gardens at Bowood. Photo, Queen, 

Dec. 16th, 1916. 
[Constable's Salisbury Cathedral]. Photo from print, Country Life, Dec. 
9th, 1916. 



294 Wiltshire Illustrations. 

Salisbury. Chafyn Grove School. " View from the School Building," " The 

Approach to the Building," " The School Building," " View from the 

Cricket Field," "The Dining Hall," "The School Hall," "A Class 

Room!" Seven photos in School prospectus, 1916. 
[Enford, Combe Farm.] Growing Oats for the Army in Wilts. Four 

photos with portrait of E. B. Maton, Daily Mirror, Jan. 12th, 1917. 
" Unique Service at Enford." Photo of the Vicars of Enford and Fittleton 

holding a service in the field on Sunday, April 15th, 1917, for the men 

employed in Mr. E. B. Maton's great work of ploughing up 1000 acres 

of grass land, the ploughing being carried on on Sundays as well as 

weekdays. Salisbury Journal , April 21st, 1917. 
Salisbury Volunteers. Three photos, Salisbury Journal, May 5th, 1917. 
Salisbury. Lord Roberts' Memorial Workshops. Photo, Salisbury Journal 

May 19th, 1917. 
Salisbury Plain, King Reviewing Troops. Photo, Queen, Feb. 24th, 1917. 
Sheldon House. Photos, Supp. to Country Life, Dec. 9th, 1916, Feb. 17th, 

1917. 
Worton, Littlecourt. Two photos, Supp. to Country Life, March 3rd, 1917. 
Longleat. Groups of Wounded Soldiers in the Hall and on the Bowling 

Green. Three photos, Daily Sketch, May 3lst, 1917. 
Bratton. Baptist Church, with account of proceedings at the 250th Anni- 
versary. Photo, Wiltshire Times, June 9th, 1917. 
Winterbourne Monkton. West Farm, Parsonage Farm, Middle Farm, East 

Farm. Good photos in Particulars of Sale of Estate of N. R. R. Young, 

Esq., July 26th, 1917, Folio. 
Lee House, near Malmesbury. Four views (three exterior, one of Lounge 

Hall), in Particulars of Sale, Juno 21st, 1917. Quarto. 
Elston House (Orcheston St. George). Two exterior photo views on plate 

in Sale Particulars, June 19th, 1917. Folio. 
Ansty Church and Guest House of Knights Hospitallers. Illust. from 

drawing, on appeal for Church repair, 1917. 
Trowbridge Boy Scouts Trek Camp, and Volunteers' Camp at Bratton. 

Three photos. Wiltshire Times, Aug. 18th, 1917. 
Tablet erected by Warneford family in Highworth Church to memory of 

Lieut. R. A. J. Warneford, V.C. Photo, Daily Sketch, Aug. 24th. 1917. 
Red Cross F&te at Chippenham. Photo, Wiltshire Times, Sept. 8th, 1917. 
Beechingstoke Manor, and Manor Farm, Manningford Bohune. Two photo 

plates in Sale Particulars of Manningford Bohune Estate, <fec, Sept. 

20th, 1917. 
Chippenham Flooded Streets. Daily Sketch, Jan. 22nd ; Cadets Training 

at R.G.A. School at Trowbridge, Ibid, Jan. 14th, 1918. 
Wiltshires Returning from the Trenches. Daily Sketch, Feb. 4th, 1918. 
Salisbury Cathedral with a Napier (car) in the foreground. Photo, Country 

Life, Feb. 1918. 
Wayside Crucifix erected at Wingfield. Photo with account of its dedi- 
cation, Wiltshire Times, Nov. 3rd, 1917. 
Wingfield Red Cross Hospital. Birthday Gathering. Photo, Wiltshire 

Times. March 23rd, 1918. 



Additions to Library. 295 

Funeral of Col. Napier Miles at Malmesbury. Two photos, Daily Sketch. 
June 5th, 1918. 

The Bridge at Bradford-on-Avon. Reproduction of Pen Drawing, Christian 
Science Monitor, Boston, U.S. A., Sept. 25th, 1918. 

South Marston. St. Mary's Church from the Manor House Lawn, The 
Manor House from the South, Ditto from the East. Three photos, 
Sale Particulars of South Marston Estate, Nov. 18th, 1918. 

Lucknam. Six photo views of the House (The Front of the House [2], 
Library, Hall, Boudoir, Bath Lodge,) and Ground-Plan, also photos of 
Thickwood Farm, and Manor Farm, Euridge, in " Particulars of Sale 
. . . of Lucknam." Aug. 14th, 1918. Folio. 

A Group of Wilts V.A.D. Workers of Bradford-on-Avon, and two Groups 
of Wiltshire Sailors and Marines. Wiltshire Times, Oct. 5th, 1$18. 

Stonehenge. Four photos in Sphere, Oct 5th, 1918 : "An Old Engraving," 
" How the Date of the Construction was Calculated," " The Damaged 
South- West Side," " The North-Eastern Side." 

Trowbridge (celebrating the armistice). " Scene outside the Town Hall," 
"Discharging the Joy Guns in the Park," "Messrs. Haden & Sons' 
Munition Workers," " A Portion of the Crowd," " The Lantern Pro- 
cession. Five photos, Wiltshire Times, Nov. 16th, 1918. 

Salisbury. Poultry Cross, reproduction of pencil drawing, with motor. 
Advert., Country Life, Nov. 30th, 1918. 



ADDITIONS TO LIBRARY. 



Presented by The Author, C. P. Hurst : Reprint of paper on Mosses 
from Journal of Botany, 1918. 
„ „ Marlborough Coll. Nat. Hist. Soc. : Back number of the 

Report for 1913. 
„ ,, Mr. J. J. Slade : Sale Catalogues of the Morrison Auto- 
graphs and of the Huth Library, and 25 Sale Particulars 
of Wiltshire Properties. 
„ „ Mr. R. Parsons : Four old Deeds connected with Clyffe 

Pypard. 



2£6; 



Additions to Library, 



Presented by The Author, Canon E. P. Knubley -. "The Origin of 
Tithes," art. in The Treasury, 1918. 
„ „ Salisbury Museum : An. Report, 1918. 

„ „ Capt. B. H. Cunnington:- '"Gentlemen. at Arms," by Cen- 

'•'■- '• /•■ turion. 1918. 

s, „ Mr. Percy Farrer : Drawing of Bronze Celt from Durrington. 
r „ „ The Author, Mr. Edward Slow: "The Great War, a 
: ~; .rV ■ V^est Countrie Dialogue between Fred & Mark." 1918. 
„ ' ,; . rftsy, C. V. Goddard : "A Royal Road; History, of,, .the 

L. & S. W. R." 1883. " Salisbury Journal." 
„ „ The Author, Mrs. Bevan : "The Home and the War" 
(Littlecote). 1918. 
,.:• The Proprietors : " The Wiltshire Advertiser," "The Wilt- 
shire Gazette " " The Wiltshire Times." 




2 8 OCT 1951 



C. H. Woodward, Printer and Publisher, Exchange Buildings, Station Road, Devizes. 



THE SOCIETY'S PUBLICATIONS (Continued), 

STONEHENGE AND ITS BAKROWS, by W. Long, Nos. 46-47 of the 
Magazine in separate wrapper, 7s. 6d. This still remains the best and most 
reliable account of Stonehenge and its Earthworks, 

WILTSHIRE— The TOPOGRAPHICAL COLLECTIONS OF JOHN 
AUBREY, F.R.S., A.D. 1659-1670. Corrected and enlarged by the Rev. 
Canon J. E. Jackson, M.A., F.S.A. 4to, Cloth, pp. 491, with 46 plates. 
Price £2 10s. 

WILTSHIRE INQUISITIONES POST MORTEM. CHARLES I. 8vo, 
pp. vii. + 501. 1901. With full index. In 8 parts, as issued. Price 13s. 

DITTO. IN THE REIGNS OF HEN. III., ED. I., and ED. II. 8vo 
pp. xv., 505. In parts as issued. Price 13s. 

DITTO. FROM THE REIGN OF ED. III. 8vo., pp. 402. In six 

parts as issued. Price 13s. 

A BIBLIOGRAPHY or the GREAT STONE MONUMENTS of 
WILTSHIRE, STONEHENGE and AVEBURY, with other references, 
by W. Jerome Harrison, F.G.S., pp. 169, with 4 illustrations. No. 89, Dec, 
1901, of the Magazine. Price 5s. 6d. Contains particulars as to 947 books, 
papers, &c, by 732 authors, 

THE TROPENELL CARTULARY. An important work in 2 vols., 8vo, 
pp. 927, containing a great number of deeds connected with property in many 
Wiltshire Parishes of the 14th and 15th centuries. Only 150 copies were 
printed, of which a few are left. Price to members, .£1 10s., and to non- 
members, £2. 



WILTSHIRE MAMMALS, BIRDS, & REPTILES. 

Mr. G. B. Hony, 4, Beaufort Boad, Clifton, Bristol, will be 
greatly obliged if members would kindly send him notice of 
the occurrence of any rare birds within the borders of the 
County, or of the occurrence of unusual mammals or reptiles. 

BOOKBINDING. 

Books carefully Bound to pattern. 

This department now greatly enlarged. 

Wilts Archaeological Magazine bound to match previous volume?. 

We have several back numbers to make up sets. 

C. H. WOODWARD, Printer and Publisher, 

Exchange Buildings, Station Road, Devizes. 



THE 

North Wilts Museum and 
LIBRARY AT DEVIZES. 



In answer to the appeal made in 1905, annual subscriptions 
varying from £2 to 5s., to the amount of about £30 a year for this 
purpose have been given since then by about seventy Members of 
the Society and the fund thus set on foot has enabled the 
Committee already to add much to the efficiency of the Library 
and Museum. 

It is very desirable that this fund should be raised to at least 
£50 a year, in order that the General Fund of the Society may 
be released to a large extent from the cost of the Museum, and 
set free for the other purposes of the Society. 

Subscriptions of 5s. a year, or upwards, are asked for, and 
should be sent either to Mr. D. Owen, Bank Chambers, Devizes, 
or Eev. E. H. Goddard, Clyffe Vicarage, Swindon. 

The Committee appeal to Members of the Society and others 
to secure any 

Objects of Antiquity, 

AND 

Specimens of unusual Birds, 
Butterflies, or Moths, 

found in the County of Wilts and to forward .them to the 
Hon. Curator, Mr. B. H. Cunnington, Devizes ; 

Whilst Old Deeds, Modern Pamphlets, Articles, 

Portraits, Illustrations from recent Magazines 

or Papers bearing in any way on the County, 

and Sale Particulars of Wiltshire Properties, 

will be most gratefully received for the Library by the Rev. 
E. H. Goddard, Clyffe Vicarage, Swindon, Hon. Librarian. 

C. H. WOODWARD, MAOHirtE PRINTER, DEVIZES. 



_ 



No. CXXX. JUNE, 1919. Vol. XL. 



THE 



WILTSHIEE 

Archaeological & Natural History 

MAGAZINE, 

Published under the Direction of the 

SOCIETY FOEMED IN THAT COUNTY, 
A. D. 1853. 



EDITED BY 

REV. E. H. GODDARD, Clyffe Vicarage, Swindon. 

[The authors of the papers printed in this " Magazine'' are alone responsible for all 
statements made therein,] 




DEVIZES : 

Printed and sold for the Society by C. H. Woodward, 

Exchange Buildings, Station Road. 



Price as. 6d. Members, Gratis. 



NOTICE TO MEMBERS. 
TAKE NOTICE, that a copious Index for the preceding eight 
volumes of the Magazine will be found at the end of Vols. 
viii., xvi., xxiv., and xxxii. The subsequent Volumes are 
each indexed separately. 

Members who have not paid their Subscriptions to the Society for 
the current year, are requested to remit the same forthwith to 
the Financial Secretary, Mr. David Owen, Bank Chambers, 
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The Annual Subscription to the Society is 10/6, with an entrance 
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The Numbers of this Magazine will be delivered grafts, as issued, 
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All other communications to be addressed to the Honorary Secre- 
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THE SOCIETY'S PUBLICATIONS. 

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THE BRITISH AND ROMAN ANTIQUITIES OF THE NORTH 
WILTSHIRE DOWNS, by the Rev. A, C. Smith, M.A. One Volume, Atlas 
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One copy offered to each Member of the Society at £1 lis. 6d. 

THE FLOWERING PLANTS OF WILTSHIRE. One Volume, 8vo, 
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CATALOGUE of the STOURHEAD COLLECTION of ANTIQUITIES 
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WILTSHIRE 

Archaeological & Natural History 

MAGAZINE. 



No. CXXX. JUNE, 1919. Vol. XL. 



Contents 



PAGE 



The Church Survey in Wilts, 1649— 50 : [Parliamentary Surveys 
(Lambeth), Vol. XIV., &c] Communicated by the Ven. Arch- 
deacon E. J. Bodington (continued) 297 — 317 

Wiltshire Newspapers, Past \nd Present. Part III. The 
Newspapers of South Wilts: By Mrs. Herbert Richardson, 
B.A., sometime Scholar of St. Hugh's College, Oxford... 318 — 351 

Notes , 352—368 

Wilts Obituary. 369—374 

Additions to Museum and Library 374 — 375 

Accounts op the Society for the Year 1918 376 — 379 

List of Officers and Members of the Society 380—388 



Dkvizls:— C. H. Woodward, Exchange Buildings, Station Road. 



THE 

WILTS HIRE MAGAZ INE. 

" MULTOEUM MA.NIBU8 GRANDE LEVATUE ONUS." — Ovid. 

No. CXXX. June, 1919. Vol. XL, 

THE CHURCH SUKVEY IN WILTS, 1649—50. 
[Parliamentary Surveys (Lambeth), Vol. XXV., &c] 

Communicated by the Ven. Aechdeacon E. J. Bodington. 

I. Parochial Surveys. 

(Continued from p. 260 J 

Wiltes. 1 An Inquisition indented taken at the Cittie of Newe Sarum 
in the Countie of Wiltes the five and Twentieth day of June in the 
yeare of our Lord God one thousand sixe hundred and fiftie. Before 
Francis Dove gentl: Mayor of the said Cittie of Newe Sarum, Edward 
Manning Esquire, Anthony Trotman gentl. James Abbott gentl. William 
Wastfeild gentl. and John Ivie thelder gentl. by vertue of a commission 
vnder the greate seale of England to them and others directed for the 
inquirie of the values of Churches Chappells Rectories parsonages viccar- 
idges and divers other things in the said commission mencioned within the 
said countie of Wiltes vpon the oathes of Walter Dowse John Ranger 
George Myles John Heme jun. John Heme sen. Robert Butler, and 
Edward fteeve Thomas Edwardes, Edward Legge, Thomas Beckington, 
Marmaduke Deecke John Battin, Thomas Horte, William Cooper, Edmond 
Batt William Truman, William Bawden, Jeremy Gough Nathaniell Legge 
and John Sutton, good and lawful men of the said hundred of Elstubbe 
and Everley, within the said County whoe present upon their oathes as 
followeth videl 1 . 

[Endorsed. Precept 9th July 1649. D d by Mr. Treasurer July 24, 1655.] 

ELSTUB AND EVERLEY HUNDEED. 

Sarum Division. 
Everley. Imprimis wee present that in Everley there is a parsonage 
presentative in the guifte of the state without any viccaridge or chappel of 
the value of one hundred and fower score pound es per annum. That Mr. 

1 Lambeth Pari. Surveys, Vol. XIV., p. 341., et. seq. 
VOL. XL. — NO. CXXX. Z 






298 The Church Survey in Wilts, 1649—50. 

Christofer Tisdall is the present Incumbent vnder the broad seale serveth 
the cure and preacheth constantlie twice everie Lordes day and receives 
the profittes. That he paies a pension of forty shillinges per annum to the 
Trustees for the Deane and Chapters Landes. Witnesses : Anthony 
Kempton William Chamberlane William Harris Samuell Monke. 

Hamme. In Hamme there is a parsonage presentative in the guifte 
formerly of the Deane and Cannons of Windsor nowe in the state of the 
value of Seaventy poundes per annum, Mr. Henry Newlin is the present 
Incumbent supplies the Cure, and preacheth constantlie twice every Lordes 
day and receives the profittes. Witnesses William Cooper Nicholas Newlin. 

Fatney. In Patney there is a parsonage presentative formerly in the 
guift of the Deane and Chapter of Winton of the value of one hundred 
pounds per annum sequestred from Dr. Marshe, Mr. John Massey is 
present Incumbent supplies the Cure and preaches constantly twice every 
Lordes day and receives the proffittes Witnesses Robert Amor Richard 
Hayword John Druett. 

Collingborne. In Collingborne there is a parsonage presentative in 
the guifte of the Marquisse of Hartford which with the Gleebe is of the 
value of three hundred poundes per annum. Mr. Henry Scudder is 
Incumbent supplies the Cure and preaches Twice everie Lordes day and 
receives the profitts It's thought convenient that the Inhabitantes of 
Craileboyes Forme being of this Parishe but distant a myle and a half e from 
this Church be now vnited to the Church of Ludgershall which is but half 
a myle and to be of that congregacion. And further that the Inhabitantes 
of Collingborne Sunton, beinge Parishe to Collingborne Kingston, be 
vnited to the Church of Collingborne Ducis wholy except the Inhabitants 
of Mr. Hydes Forme. Witnesses William Fidler Walter Dowse Edmond 
Batt. 

Alton and Stowell. In Alton and Stowell there is a parsonage im 
propriate the fee whereof is in the Earle of Pembrooke held on lease by S r 
William Button of the value of Fiftie pounds per annum ; That there is 
alsoe a Viccaridge presentative and in the guifte of the Earle of Pembrooke 
The Church hereof being annexed to Overton of the value of tenne poundes 
per annum. Mr John Grigson a sequestred minister supplies the Cure 
preaches everie Lordes day in the morninge and in the afternoon reades 
common prayer and receaves the proffittes. And that it is convenient that 
Alton Barnes and Alton Priors be vnited and made one congregation 
Alton Priors to be the Parishe Churche. And that West Stowell be 
vnited to the Church of Wilcott Witnesses Aron Bay lie Henry Dornford 
William Brinson. 

Overton and Fifield. In Overton and Fifield there is a parsonage 
impropriate the fee being in the Earle of Pembrooke and held in lease by 
Mr. Bowles of Burcombe and others of the value of Two hundred and Teni 
poundes per annum That there is alsoe a Viccaridge presentative of both 
the Hamlettes of Overton and Fifield in the guifte alsoe of the Earle of 
Pembroke. Overton being of the value of Seaventie poundes per annum 



Communicated by the Ven. Archdeacon E. J. Bodington, 299 

and Fyfield Twenty five pounds per annum That Fifeild Church is 
auntientlie annexed to Overton and the Minister that was wont to be pre- 
sented to Overton did take care for the supplienge of Fyfeild but nowe at 
present the cure of Fifeild is vnsupplied and the parishioners keepes the 
profittes in their handes. Mr. Pope Joye is the present Incumbent at 
Overton and preaches twice everie Lordes daye and receives only the 
profittes of Overton. And further that its is convenient that that Fifeild 
be a parishe by itselfe distincte from Overton with that part of Lockeridge 
that formerly laie to it, and also that the Hamlett of Clattford beinge 
Parishe to Preshott be united to the Church of Fifeild to be of that congre- 
gation. Witnesses Thomas Steevens William Truman, Rohert Smith. 

Orcheston St. Mary, St. George. Wee present that the Twoe 
parishes of Orcheston St. Mary and Orcheston St. George and the Hamlett 
of Elson be vnited and made one congregacion. And that the Church 
thereof be att Orcheston St. George. Looke for these Parishes further in 
Branch and Dole Hundred. 

Stockton. In Stockton there is a parsonage presentative formerly in 
guif t of the Bishops of Winton nowe in the State of the value of one hundred 
and twenty poundes per annum. It was sequestred from Doctor Christofer 
Greene. Mr. Samuell Wright is the present Incumbent supplies the Cure 
and preacheth Twice everie Lordes day and constantlie expoundes once in 
the Weeke besides and receives the profittes out of which he paies a pencion 
of Five pounds per annum vnto Ste. Crosses Hospitall neare Winton. And 
that it is convenient that the Inhabitants of Bapton, being of the Parish of 
Fisherton Dellamore be vnited vnto Stockton and to be of that congregacion 
And that the Inhabitants of Deptf ord and of the Farme of Great Bathampton 
beinge of the parishe of Wyley be alsoe vnited to the Church of Fisherton 
Dellamore and to be of that congregacion. Witnesses Christofer Elmes 
George Lucas Abraham Hayes. 

Fiddleton & Hockelston. In Fiddleton and Hockelston there is a 
Parsonage presentative in the guifte of the heires of Mr. Benjamine Jey say 
that the next avoydance is in Mr. William Jey minister and is togeather 
with the Gleabe of the value of one hundred and fower score pounds per 
annum. Mr. Mathew Hynde is the present incumbent supplies the Cure 
and preaches Twice every Lord's day and receives the profittes. It was 
sequestred from the said Mr. William Jey. There is alsoe a porcion of 
Tythes impropriate, The Fee thereof in the heires of the said Mr.Benjamine 
Jey of the value of Thirtye poundes per annum out of which he payes in 
olde rente to the Committee for the Revenue Three Poundes per annum. 
Witnesses Robert Rolf Thomas Milles, Jacobb Bromham. 

Netherhaven and Chissenbury Delaffolly. In Netherhaven there 
\ is a Parsonage and a Viccaridge, the Parsonage is appropriated to a late 
Prebend of Sarum held in lease of Mr.Gabriell Pyle and Mr. William Tucker, 
worth with the Gleabe Two hundred and eighty poundes per annum (that 
i is to say Netherhaven twoe hundred and twentie poundes and Chissenbury 
Delaffoly sixty poundes per annum) and payes in old rent to the Trustees 
for Deane and Chapter landes, Thirtie pounds per annum. The Vicaridge 

Z 2 



300 The Church Survey in Wilts, 1649—50. 

is a presentation in the guifte formerly of the said Prebend now in the 
State of the vallue of Forty five poundes per annum Mr. John Kinge 
Incumbent, supplies the cure preacheth everie Lordes day and receiveth the 
profittes. It's thought convenient that the Inhabitants of Chissenbury 
Dellaffolly beinge three myles distant from Netherhaven Church wherto 
they are parishe be nowe vnited vnto Endford Church to be of that congre- 
gation. John Kinge John Baicb. 

Enford, Chissenbury Priory, Combe, Fifield, Littlecott, 
Iiongstreet, and Compton. It consistes of a Parsonage and Viccaridge 
the Parsonage is impropriate and the Fee thereof in Mr. John Howe of the 
vallue of Three hundred and twenty poundes per annum ; the Viccaridge 
is a presentacion in the guifte of the heires of Mr. Rolfe deceased and is of 
the value of one hundred and twenty poundes per annum Mr. Henry 
Culpepper is the present Incumbent supplies the cure preacheth everie 
Lordes Day and receiveth the proffittes of the viccarridge. Witnesses John 
Mundy William Bawdin Edmund Reeve. 

Rolston. In Rolston there is a parsonage presentative in the guifte of 
the State formerly in the Lord Keeper of the value of Fortie poundes per 
annum. Mr. George Hadfeild is the present Incumbent supplies the cure 
and preacheth Twice every Lord's Day and receiveth the proffittes. It was 
sequestred from Mr. James White. Memorandum that this Parishe is 
vnited to the Church of Maydenton. See further of it in Branche and 
Dole Hundred. Witnesses : George Myles Thomas Netton 

Brought on. This Parishe is to be referred to the Inquirie of the 
Commissioners of Malborough division. 

Little Hinton. In Little Hinton there is a parsonage presentative in 
the guifte formerly of the late Bishopp of Winton or Sarum (nowe in the 
State) of the value of one hundred poundes per annum. Mr. Peter Nicholls 
is the present incumbent supplies the cure and preacheth every Lords day 
and receives the proffitts out of which he payes a pencion of Fortie shillings 
per annum formerly to the late Deane of Winton and is now payeable to the 
State. Witnesses : Thomas Lord Robert Harris Thomas Loveday. 

Westford and Zfford. Westford and Ifford beinge summoned did 
not appeare. Fran : Dove Edward Manning James Abbott Tho Hancocke 
Anth. Trotman. 



II. Valuations of Church Property. 

(Continued from p. 272.) 

Wiltes. 1 Netherhaven Rectoria. A Survey of the Prebend and 
impropriate Parsonage of Netherhaven, with the rights, members and ap- 
purtenances thereof, sett lyinge and being within the Parish of Netherhaven 
in Com. Wiltes, late parcell of the possessions or late belonging to one of 
the Prebendaries of the Cathedrall Church of ye Virgin Mary of Sarum, 

1 Lambeth Pari. Surveys, Vol. XV., pp. 193—194. 



Communicated by the Ven. Archdeacon E. J. Bodington. 301 

made & taken in the moneth of November 1649 by vs whose names are 
herevnto subscribed by virtue of a Commission to vs graunted grounded 
vpon an act of the Commons of England [&c, as above]. 

Cleere values and Improvemts. per annum Annuall rents reserved. All 
that the Parsonage house of Netherhaven, consisting of a Hall a Parlour, a 
Kitchin, a Dairy Roome, a Buttery, a Brewhouse, a Banquetting house, 
seaven chambers, two Garrettes, two Orchardes, a Barton, two Barnes & viij 
bayes of buildinge, a Stable of foure bayes cont : per estimacion 02. 00. v 11 . 

One other old decayed Barne of foure Bayes of buildinge, standing within 
the Tithing of Chisenbury de la Folly in the Parish of Netherhaven afore- 
said, worth per annum 00. 00. x 8 . 

One close of Meadow called by the name of the Parsonage Mead adjoyning 
to the Barne of the parsonage House aforesaid conteyning per estimation 
03. 00. vj 11 . 

One close of Pasture called by the name of Peacehayes adjoyning to the 
Churchyard of Netherhaven cont. per estimation 00. 02. x s . 

One close of Pasture called Reynoldes adjoyning to a meadow called John 
Hochman's Meade cont. per estimation 02. 00. ij u . 

The Foreshare of a parcell of Meadow lying in a Common Meade within 
the parish of Netherhaven called the Southmead conteyning per estimation 
01. 00. X s . 

The Foreshare of of a parcell of Meadow lying in a Common Meade 
within the Parrish of Netherhaven called Corfe Mead cont. per estimation 
00. 03. x s . 

Severall parcells Arrable lying dispersedly in one of the Common Feildes of 
Netherhaven called the North Feild cont. per estimation 38. 00. xij li .xiij 3 .iiij d . 

Severall parcells of Arrable lying dispersedly in one of the Common 
Feildes of Netherhaven called the Middle Feild cont. per estimation 47. 00. 
xv 11 . xiij s . iiij d - 

Severall parcells of Arrable lying dispersedly in one of the Common 
Feildes of Netherhaven called the South feild cont. per estimation 24. 00. 

viii d . 

The number of Acres 118. 01. 51. 06. 08. 

The Tithe belonging to the Impropriate Parsonage of Netherhaven con- 
sisting of the Tithe of all sorts of graine growing within the said Parrish 
(except out of the Glebelandes aforemencioned, The Tithe whereof is due 
and payable to the Viccar of the Parrish Church of Netherhaven) & of Hey 
(except out of Mr. Bushells Meadow called Linchards Meade cont. per 
estimation two acres and of foure other small parcells due to the aforesaid 
Viccar) and of two parts of three of all wooll & Lambe arrising vpon a 
Farme called Mr. Wardens Farme & vpon another Farme called Mr. 
Howe's Farme, lying within the said Parrish of Netherhaven, and vpon 
two Livings, the one in the possession of John Sutton, and the other in the 
possession of Mr. Tho: Pile, lying likewise within the aforesaid Parrish of 
Netherhaven, and all Wooll and Lambe arrising upon a Farme in the 
tenure and possession of Anthony Browning lying within the ty thing of 
Chesinbury de la Folly in the aforesaid parrish of Netherhaven. All which 



302 The Church Survey in Wilts, 1649—50. 

Tithe before mencioned (except before excepted) is worth per annum ccc lf . 

Somme totall is ccclj 11 . vj 3 . viij d . 

Chr. Weare Geo. Faireley Walt. Foy Jo. Squibb. 

An abstract of the Lease produced vnto vs this 26th of December 1649 
of the Prebend and Parsonage of Netherhaven in Com. Wiltes by Mr . 
Gabriel Pile the present Propriator thereof, which is to bee annexed vnto 
our late Survey of the Prebend. 

All the Prebend and Parsonage of Netherhaven in the County of Wiltes. 
With the portion of Chesinbury belonging to the same Prebend with all 
lands tenements Feedings commons Titheings Fruites and all other com- 
modities, emolumentes advantages and profitts to the same Prebend and 
Parsonage in any manner of wayes growing or belonging, with all and 
singuler their appurtenances (all woodes the Advowson of the Viccaridge 
of the said Prebend & Church of Netherhaven and all spirituall jurisdiction 
belonging to the said Prebend to the then Prebendary & to his successors, 
alwaies excepted and reserved) were by Indenture dated 8° Martii 2* 
Edwardi Sexti demised by Simon Simonds Canon Resident of the Cathedrall 
Church of Sarum and Prebendary of the Prebend of Netherhaven in the said 
County of Wiltes vnto William Symondes of the Citty of New Sarum in the 
said county Gent. Habendum the premisses (except before excepted) vnto the 
said William Symonds & his assignes, to commence from the Feast of St. 
Michaell Tharchangell next and immediately following [vnto] the end & 
terme of Forty and one yeares in the said Indenture mentioned to bee 
before demised and graunted by the said Simon Symondes vnto Henry 
Brunker of Erlestoake in the said County of Wiltes by Indenture dated 
26° Junii 27 Henrici Octavi, next & immediately after the surrender, or 
forfeiture of the said Lease by the said Henry Brunker or his assignes) 
vnto the end 'and terme of fourescore & ten yeares, vnder the yearly Rent 
of Thirty poundes at the Feastes of the Annunciation of the Virgin Mary, 
and St. Michaell Tharchangell by even porcions. 

The Leasee is to repaire the premisses and to take hedgeboote,Ploughboote, 
Wallboote, and Foldboote, vpon the premisses for the reparacion therof. 

The Leassor is to keepe & save harmles the Leassee vnder the yearly 
rent aforesaid from all manner of Charges as well ordinary as extraordinary. 
If the Rent bee behind by the space of one Moneth being lawfully 
demaunded, and noe distresse to bee found, then a Reentry 

The Remainder of the Terme is in Gabriel Pile son of Gabriel Pile esqr. 
deceased : [ Witnesses] Chr. Weare Walt. Foy Jo. Squibb. Examt per Will. 
Webb 1649. 

I. Parochial Surveys. 

DOWNTON, CAWDON & CADWORTH, & CHALKE 

HUNDREDS. 

# 

Wiltes 1 Sarum Division. An Inquisition indented taken att the 
Citty e of New Sarum in the County e of Wilts the Eighteenth daye of June 



Lambeth Pari. Surveys, Vol. XIV., p. 367, seq. 



Communicated by the Ven. Archdeacon E. J % Bodington. 303 

in the yeare of our Lord God, one thousand six hundred and fiftye Before 
Francis Doue gent, Mayor of the said Cittye of New Sarum James Abbot 
gent. Thomas Hancocke the younger gent. Barnaby Coles Esqr. William 
Coles gent, and Anthony Trottman gent by vertue of a commission vnder 
the greate seale of England to them & other directed for the Inquirye of 
the Values of Churches, Chappells, Rectories, Parsonages, viccariges and 
diuers other things in the said commission mencioned within the said 
Countye of Wiltes vpon the oathes of John Bampton gent. Henry Good 
gent. Thomas Clarke, Richard Sanders, Thomas Wheeler, Richard Light, 
Edward Tice, Robert Rowdon, John Barber, Thomas Feltham, Robert 
Long, Thomas Gesper,Thomas"Shergoll,Theophilus Lambert, John Newman, 
Henry Bradshawe, Robert Parker, and Francis Jaye good and Lawfull men 
of the hundreds of Downton, Cawdon, & Cadworth and Chalke within the 
Countye who present vpon their oathes as followeth (vizt) 

DOWNTON HUNDRED. 

Knoile and Hindon. Vide for the particulars of Knoile and Hindon 
at the latter ende of this Inquisition 

Funthill Episcopi. Imprimis wee present that the parish of Funthill 
Episcopi doth consist of a parsonage onely being a presentation and was 
in the guifte of the late Bishopp of Winton and of the value of Threescore 
pounds per annum ; the present Incumbent is Mr. Robert Oldinge who 
supplies the cure and receiveth the proffitts and preacheth constantly twice 
every Lords daye. Witnesses: — William Edwards Thomas Feltham John 
Lamporte. 

Downton. Item wee present that the Parsonage and Viccaridge of 
Downton are appropriated to the Colledge of Winton, whoe are Patrons 
of the Viccaridge ; the Parsonage with the Gleebe Lands is worth Seaven 
hundred pounds per annum held in lease by Mr. Gilbert Rawlie ; the 
Viccaridge is worth Fortye pounds per annum Mr. Samuell Coxe is Viccar 
and receiveth the Proffittes and preacheth constantly every Lords Daye 
Wee conceive it fitt that the hamlett of Hampworth within the Parish of 
Downton which lieth three Myles distant from the parish Church of 
Downton bee anexed to the Parish of Landford in the hundred of Frusfeild 
within the said Countie beinge not above halfe a myle distant and alsoe 
that the Chapell of Stanlinch bee taken away and vnited to the Parish 
Churche of Downton beinge distant not much above halfe a myle and verye 
good way. And alsoe that the two Churches of Nunton and Odstocke bee 
vnited and made one and that Nunton bee the Parish Church for the In- 
habitants of Odstocke. Nunton and Bodenham the parishe of Nunton doth 
consist of two villages Nunton and Bodenham and hath a Church and a 
Viccars house and are two myles from Downton : the tithe of Corne woole 
and Lambe worth three score poundes per annum belongeth to the college 
in Winton and is paid to the Farmer of the Parsonage. Downton, and 
Nunton are vnited and given to a Viccar by presentation from the Colledge 
the Viccar receiveth the small tithes worth sixe poundes per annum and 
fiftye shillings per annum from the colledge for servinge the Cure of Nunton : 



304 The Church Survey in Wilts, 1649—50. 

if the parishes of Nunton and Odstocke bee vnited the parishioners desire 
preachinge att eatch Church every Lords daye once. Witnesses :— Lewes 
Newman William Michell Roger Gantlett William Kelloway. 

Bishopston. Item wee present that the Parsonage of Bishopston is 
presentative whereof the Right honorable the Earle of Pembrooke and 
Mountgomery is Patron and is worth f oure hundred pounds per annum and 
that the present Incumbent is Doctor Ralphe Chaldecott whoe receiveth the 
promtts supplies the cure and preacheth once and expoundeth once ever 
Lords daye. Witnesses : — John Shergold William Elmes Moses Blake and 
Edward King. 

CAWDON AND CADWORTH HUNDRED. 

Stratforde Toney. Item wee present that the Parsonage of Stratf orde 
Toney is presentative whereof Edward Hyde esquier is the Patron and is 
worth one hundred and thirtye pounds per annum that Mr.DouglasCastillion 
is the present Incumbent and serveth the Cure and preacheth constantly 
and receiveth the profitts. Wee conceive it fitt that the Inhabitants of those 
howses in Homington that are Parish to Stratford Toney and lyeinge two 
myles distant be vnited to the Church of Homington. Witnesses : — John 
Barker John Michell. 

Homington. Item wee present that the Parsonage of Homington was 
appropriated to the late Deane and Chapter of the Cathedrall Church of 
Sarum and Thomas Warre gent, holdeth the same from them by lease and 
is worth one hundred pounds per annum out of which hee payeth tenn 
pounds per annum to the Trustees. Master Roger Hulett 1 is the Incumbent 
who preacheth sometymes and is insteed of him who should serve the cure 
and should receive for his salary from Mr. Warre Twentye pounds per 
annum Witnesses : — John Penny Nicholas Francis John Duland Ambrose 
Bampton. 

Combe Bissett. Item wee present that Combe Bissett consisteth of a 
Parsonage and viccaridge appropriated to a Prebend of the Cathedrall 
Church of Sarum beinge Corps (sic). That the Parsonage and the Gleebe 
lands are worth one hundred and Twentye poundes per annum the olde Rent 
paid to the Trustees for the sale of Deane and Chapters lands is seaven- 
teene pounds per annum ; the Viccaridge is worth Fortye poundes per 
annum Mr. Hector Carpender 2 Minister is the present Incumbent, supplies 
the Cure preacheth twice every Lords daye and hath the Viccaridge for 
his Sallery. The Viccaridge was sequestred from Mr. Henry Beache. 
Witnesses :— John Handcocke gent. George Evans and Andrew Luxell. 

West Harnham. Item wee present That the Parsonage of Weste 
Harnham is appropriated to a Prebend of the Cathedrall Church of Sarum 
and is worth one hundred pounds per annum and held in lease of Mr. 
Francis Read. Mr. William Hunte is the present Incumbent and receiveth 
for his Sallary out of the parsonadge Fortye pounds per annum and 
preacheth twice every Lords daye : ther is Fif teene pound per annum 
payd by Mr. Read to the Trustees. Witnesses : — Roger Langley and 
Richard Woodware. v 

1 Hewlett, p. 310. 2 Carpenter, p. 311. 



Communicated by the Ven. Archdeacon E, J. Bodington. 305 

Odstocke. Item wee present that the Parsonage of Odstock is pre- 
ventative in the guifte of the State and formerly in the guift of Sir John 
Webb a Recusant and is worth one hundred pound per annum and that 
Mr. John Swafell is the present Incumbent whoe receiveth the profitts 
and preacheth constantly. Its thought fitt that the Parishe of Odstocke 
bee vnited to the parishe of Nunton as aforesaid in Downton Hundred. 
Witnesses : — Roger Chubbe and Steephen Banckes. 

Birtford. Item wee present that there are in Birtford a parsonage and 
& viccaridge the Viccaridge is a presentation. That the Parsonage is ap- 
propriated to the late Deane and Chapter of the Cathedrall Church of 
Sarum held in Lease by Mr. Keckwich and is of the value of two hundred 
twentye five pounds per annum. The olde Rent paid to the Trustees is 
twentye pound per annum. Alsoe one Mr. Goodale holdeth by lease from 
the Deane and Chapter of Windsor twelve pounds per annum out of 
Langford 1 and payeth to the Trustees Twentye shillings per annum. The 
Viccaridge is of value Fiftye poundes per annum. Mr. Edward Fawconer 
is the present Incumbent receiveth the profitts and preacheth constantly. 
Wee conceive it to bee fitt that East Harnham being within the parish of 
Birtford and a myle distant from the same may bee vnited to the Parishe 
of West Harnham to which it adioyneth ; the guifte of the Viccaridge of 
Birtford is in the State. Witnesses -.—Robert Edmonds gent. John Soper. 

Sutton Mandeuile. Item wee present that the Parsonage of Sutton 
Mandevile is presentative nowe in the guifte of Sir Carew Reynoldes knight 
which parsonage with the Gleebe lands is worth one hundred pounds per 
annum and that Mr. John Pewde is the present incumbent supplies the 
Cure and preacheth twice every Lords daye. Witnesses : — Henry Sanger 
Ellis Rose, Davide Feltham Thomas Lucas. 

Barford Saint Martins. Item we present that the parsonage of 
Barford Saint Martins is presentative nowe vnder sequestration in the guifte 
of John Bowles esquier there is noe Viccaridge the Parsonage with the gleebe 
land is of the value of one hundred and fiftye poundes per annum Mr. John 
Woodbridge is the present incumbent supplies the Cure receiveth the 
profitts and preacheth constantly twice every Lordes daye. Witnesses : — 
Mr. John : 2 : Mr. John Scovell Nicholas Hibberd Christopher Crouch. 

Povent. Item wee present that the Parsonage of Fovent is presentative 
in the guifte of the Earle of Pembrooke and Mountgomery ; there is noe 
Viccaridge or Chappell the value of the Parsonage with the Gleebe Land 
is one hundred and eighty pounds per annum. Mr. John Priaux is the 
present Incumbent supplies the Cure receiveth the whole proffitts and 
preacheth constantly twice every Lords day. Witnesses :— Francis Night- 
ingale Humphrie Candie Thomas Baker. 

Baberstocke. Item wee present that the Parsonage of Baberstocke is 
presentative in the guifte of Mr. Gawen a Recusant there is noe Viccaridge 
or Chappell. The Parsonage with the Gleebe Land is of the value of 
Fowerscore poundes per annum. Mr. Christopher Willoughby is the 

1 See below. 2 Blank in MS. 



306 The Church Survey in Wilts, 1649—50. 

present Incumbent supplies the Cure receiveth the whole profittes and 
preacheth onely once every Lords daye. Witnesses : — John Lyde, John 
Hayter John Nicholas. 

South Burcombe and North Burcombe. Item wee present that 
in South Burcombe and in North Burcombe there is a Parsonage and a 
Viccaridge. The Parsonage is presentative and annexed to the Parsonage 
of Wilton and is in the guif te of the Earl of Pembrooke and Mountgomery. 
The Viccaridge is presentative and in the guifte of Mr. Andrewe Bowerman 
as M r . of the Hoapitall of St. Johns in Ditchampton and is appropriated to 
the same Hospitall ; the value of the tythes of South Burcombe is forty 
pounds per annum the value of the tythes of North Burcombe is twentye 
pounds per annum held in Lease by Walter Dawkins and Robert Dawkins 
whoe pay the ould rent of fower pounds sixe shillings eight pence per 
annum to Mr. Bowerman as Master of the said Hospitall the tythes of 
South Burcombe are received by Mr. Chander it beinge an appendixe to 
the Parsonage of Wilton the value of the Viccaridge consistinge of small 
tythes is of the value of tenn pounds per annum. Mr. Samuel Maniston 
is the present Incumbent supplies the cure preacheth twice every Lords 
daye and receiveth onely for his paines the profittes of the tythes of the 
said Viccaridge. Witnesses: — . . . . ! Selwood Walter Gray John London. 

Bramshawe. See for Bramshawe parsonage in the presentmentes of 
the hundred of branche and Dole. 

Netherhampton. Item wee present that in Netherhampton there is 
a parsonage and a Viccaridge the Parsonage is impropriated the Fee thereof 
beinge in the Earle of Pembrooke and Mountgomery whoe receiveth the 
profittes thereof beinge Forty pounds per annum ; the Viccaridge is an 
appendix to the Parsonage of Wilton and is of the value of seaventeene 
pounds per annum. Mr. Chandler the Minister of Wilton receiveth the 
profittes thereof Mr. John Hulett supplies the Cure as Master Chandlers 
Curat and hath onely for his paines from Mr. Chandler Tenn pounds per 
annum Master Hulett is noe preachinge minister and Mr. Chandler cometh 
once a moneth and preacheth there. This Hamlett of Netherhampton is 
vnited to Wilton to bee wholely of that congregation, vide Branche and 
Dole Hundred in the title of Wilton Witnesses : — Daniell Hill, John 
Randoll Richard Potticary Andrewe Goddard. 

Wichberrie. Item wee present that there is in Wichberrie a Parsonage 
and a Viccaridge the Parsonage an Impropriation the fee thereof beinge in 
the heires of Sir William Dodington knight deceased and of the value of 
Fortye and five poundes per annum. The Viccaridge is presentative in the 
guifte of the heires of the said Sir William Dodington and of the value of 
Fifteene pounds per annum. Mr. Thomas Starre is the present Incumbent : 
he preacheth twice every Lordes daye and receiveth the profittes of the 
Viccaridge as Viccar and the profitts of the Parsonage as a guifte freely 
giuen to him by the said Sir William Dodington for the Lief of him the 
said Thomas Starre Witnesses :— Thomas Mager John Hall Rowland 
Warren. 

1 Blank in MS. 






Communicated by the Ven. Archdeacon E. J. Bodington. 307 

CHALKE HUNDRED. 

Semblie. Item wee present that there is in Semblie a Parsonage pre- 
sentative vnder sequestration But the Mannor beinge in controversie wee 
knowe not in whose guifte the Parsonage is att present. There is noe 
Viccaridge or Chappell. The value of the Parsonage with the Gleebe land 
is one hundred and Fortye pounds per annum. Mr. Matthewe Twogood is 
the present Incumbent supplies the Cure receiveth the profitts and preacheth 
constantly twice everye Lords daye. Witnesses : — Thomas Blandford 
William Pearce Walter Blandford John Buckett. 

Barwick St. Johns. Item wee present that there is in Barwicke Saint 
Johns a Parsonage presentative in the guifte of the Earle of Pembrooke 
and Mountgomery which with the Gleebe Land is of the value of one 
hundred pounds per annum. Mr. Thomas Yard is the present Incumbent 
whoe supplies the Cure receiveth the profitts and preacheth Twice everye 
Lordes daye Wee conceive it to bee fitt that the Inhabitants of Easton 
Bassett whoe are of the Parish' of Dunhead Saint Andrewes and two myles 
distant from Dunhead Church bee vnited to Barwicke Sainte Johns they 
lyeing neare that Churche. Witnesses : — Thomas Scamell John Manke 
James Manke Bartholomewe Gilbert. 

Broad Chalke. Item wee present that there is in Broad Chalke a 
Parsonage appropriated to Kinges Colledge in Cambridge held in Lease by 
Mr. George Penruddocke. It consisteth of three Hamlettes videlicet Broad 
Chalke, Bower Chalke and Alvediston and the values are as followeth 
(videlicet) Broad Chalke is of the value of three hundred and Fiftye 
poundes per annum Bower Chalke is of the value of one hundred seaventye 
five pounds per annum and Alvediston is of the value of one hundred 
poundes per annum soe the whole value is sixe hundred twenty five pounds 
per annum. The old rent payable to Kinges Colledge out of the said 
Parsonage is in money and provision two hundred Fiftye sea ven poundes 
sixe shillinges and eight pence. The Viccaridge is presentative and in the 
guifte of the said Colledge consistinge of smale Tythes and is of the value 
of one hundred and twentye poundes per annum. Mr. John Sloper is the 
present Incumbent and supplies the Cures by himself© and two others and 
receiveth the whole profittes of the Viccaridge and preacheth constantly 
there are three Churches att each Hamlett one Mr. Butt and Mr. Bisse 
are the two Curates To each of whom Mr. Sloper alloweth twenty markes 
a yeare they all there preach constantly. These three Hamletts are soe 
farre distant the one from the other that they may not conveniently bee 
vnited either to othere wee therefore conceive it fitt that they may be made 
three severall parishes vnder the chardge of three severall Ministers there 
beinge already a Church in each Hamlett. The Incumbent Mr. Sloper was 
presented by the Colledge and instituted by the Parliament. Witnesses : — 
Henry Randoll Henry Good John Penny Bartholomewe Gilbert. 

Tollard Royall. Item wee present that the Parsonage of Tollard 
Royall is presentative and in the guifte of the State at present and formerly 
in the guifte of the Lord Arundell of Warder and the Parsonage with the 



308 The Church Survey in Wilts, 1649—50. 

Glebe Land is of the value of eighty sixe poundes per annum and Mr. 
Henry Combe is the present Incombent supplies the cure and preacheth 
constantly and reeeiveth the profitts. There is noe Viccaridge or Chappell 
there. Witnesses .—Thomas Boile Ellis Sibley Thomas Weekes. 

Ebbesborne Wake. Item wee present that there is in Ebbesborne 
Wake a Parsonage whereof one parte is appropriated to a late Prebend of 
the Cathedrall Church of Sarum, and the other parte is an Impropriation 
called the Priorie held in fee by one Master Bodenham the appropriation is 
held in Lease by Mr. Penny which with the Gleebe Land is of the value of 
one hundred poundes per annum and Mr. Henry Swaddon a sequestered 
minister supplies the Cure att present and preacheth constantly once every 
Lordes daye and sometymes twice And hath for his paines what the In- 
habitants will give him. The value of the Impropriation is Sixty poundes 
per annum. Witnesses : — Thomas Hingman James Jey Thomas Heylocke. 

Fiffeild. Item we present that the Parsonage of Fiffeild is presentative 
and in the guif te of Thomas Handcocke the elder gent, and with the Gleebe 
land is of the value iof Sixtye pounds per annum. Mr. Thomas Coles is 
the present Incumbent whoe supplies the Cure preacheth once every Lordes 
daye and reeeiveth the profittes. We conceive it fitt That the twoe 
Hamletts called East Gerrardston and West Gerrardston conteyninge 
about seaven families beinge of the Parish of Broad Chalke and Sixe 
families beinge of the parishes of Broad Chalke and Bowater Chalke called 
by the name of Newe Towne bee vnited to the Church of Fiffeild To which 
they are nearer and have better way. Witness : — William Coles. 

Hind on and Knoile, Item wee present that the Parsonage is a pre- 
sentation in the guifte of the late Bishoppe of Winton worth per annum 
Twoe hundred and Thirtye poundes besides Hindon. Mr. William Clifford 
is the present Incumbent beinge a sequestration from Doctor Christopher 
Wren. The said Mr. Clifford supplies the Cure of Knoile and preacheth 
constantly twice everye Lords daye and reeeiveth the profittes there Hindon 
Chappell is annexed to the Church of Knoile Mr. George Jenkens Minister 
supplies the Cure and preacheth constantly twice every Lordes daye and 
receives the Tythes of Hindon per annum Twentye and five poundes 
and receives a sallery of Twenty and fower poundes out of the 
Chappell Landes there. Its thought fitt and convenient that the 
Chappell of Hindon no we belonginge to the Church e of Knoile bee made 
a Parish Church of itselfe for the Congregation in Hindon. Witnesses : — 
Christopher Williams Walter Sanger Thomas Snoake William Ford John 
Clementes Richard Snowe. 

II. Valuations of Church Property. 

CAWDON AND CADWORTH HUNDRED. 

Wiltes 1 . Hommington Rectoria. A Survey of the Mannor Lord- 
shipp and Parsonage of Hummington with all the rights members and 
appurtenances thereof scituate lyinge and beinge in Comit. Wilts late 

1 Lambeth Pari. Surveys, Vol. XV., pp. 302—307. 



Communicated by the Ven. Archdeacon E. J. Bodington. 309 

parcell of the possessions or late belonginge to the late Deane and Chapter 
of the Cathedrall Church of Sarum in dicto Comit. Wilts, made and taken 
by vs whose names are herevnto subscribed in the moneth of Februarye 
1649. By vertue of a Commission to vs graunted grounded vpon an Act 
of the Commons of England assembled in Parliament (&c, as above.) 

There is belonginge to saide parsonage the Tithe of all Corne Graine Hey 
Wool Lambe,and all other small Tithes whatsoever ariseing within the said 
parishe of Hummington. There is belonging to the said parsonage the 
Tithe Hey, and certaine rates for and in Leiwe of Tithe Heye by custome 
vallued in toto per annum ■— lxxx 11 . 

All which premisses (That is to saye) all the mannor Lordshipp of 
partronadge (sic) of Hummington in the County of Wilts with all and 
singular messuages Lands, Gleabe Lands Tenements howses, Buildings 
barnes, stables ponds orchards waters fishings meadowes Leasues pastures, 
commons wast grounds, Heathes marrishes hedges Rowes woods Tythes 
pencions porcions Fruites emoluments Rents revercions services Courts 
Leets views of Frank-pledge, wayffes strayes warrenes and other rights 
privilidges Libertyes proffitts commodityes and hereditaments whatsoever 
they bee with their appurtenances to the said Mannour Lordshipp or parson- 
age in any wise appertaineinge and belonginge or which bee or have beene 
reputed accounted or taken to bee part parcell or member of the said mannour 
lordshipp and parsonage or other the premisses with their appurtenances 
(The spirituall jurisdiction of that place and the howse sometymes called 
the Viccaridge there in which howse John Chitter clarke Curate of 
Hommington aforesaid then inhabited together with the Backside orchard 
Garden and other appurtenances therevnto belonginge and all oblacions 
and Fees and Dues of and [for 1 ] Weddings Christnings Churchings and 
Burialls in the Churchyard of Hommington with the profitts thereof, and 
all fellones goods and amerciaments to the Deane and Chapter of the 
Cathedrall Church of Sarum and their successors alwaies and only excepted 
and reserved) were per Indenture dated 7° Septembris 14° Caroli By the 
Deane and Chapter of the Cathedrall Church of Sarum in Comit. Wilts, 
demised vnto Francis Swanton of the Cittye of New Sarum Esqr. Habendum 
to him his Executours and assignes from the date for 
Redditus xxx u . the terme of xxj tie yeares vnder the yearly rent dureinge 
apporcioned viz*, the space of eight yeares then next ensueinge of 
Landes 09. 00. 00 xxiij 11 . vj s . vj d . within the close of Sarum, and afterwards 
Tythes 21. 00. 00 vnder the yearly rent of xxx 11 . dureing all the residue of 

the said Terme, att the Feast of St. Michael the Arch- 

30. 00. 00 angell & the Annunciation of the Virgin Mary by even 

porcions whereof (as is expressed in the said Indenture) 

Will. Webb. Tenn pounds yearly was and is the ancient Rent re- 

1651. served to the said Deane and Chapter out of the 

June 5th. premisses and the residue increased was and is intended 

for the salary and wages of the Curate that shall 

officiate and serve the cure of the parishe Church of Homington aforesaid 

1 Omitted in MS. 



310 The Church Survey in Wilts, 1649—50. 

by the nomination and allowance of the said Deane and Chapter, But are 

worth vpon Improvement over and above the said Rent per annum 

lxxiij 11 . xiij 8 . 

If the yearly Rent or Rents bee behind by the space of 30 dayes then a v 
Reentry. 

The Lessee is to repaire the chauncel of theparishe Church of Homington 
and all other the premises. The Lessors and their Successors are to acquit 
discharge and keepe harmlesse the Lessee etc and the premisses against the 
kinge his heires and successors and all other persons of and from all manner 
of Tenths and subsidies graunted or to bee graunted by the clergy and from 
the wages stipend and Salary of the curate that shall serve and officiate the 
Cure of the parish Church of Homington, And all other charges and burdens • 
yssueing out of the premisses, (The said Tenths Subsidyes and the Salary 
and wages of the Curate of Homington aforesaid only excepted) as was (sic) 
ordinary as extraordinary the said Lessee doth covenant to beare and 
sustayne and therof to acquit the Lessors. There remayneth of the said 
terme vnexpiered tenn yeares from the 7th of September 1649. The re- 
mainder of the Terme is in Thomas Warr of the Cittye of New Sarum gent. 
By vertue of an assignement of the beforemencioned Indenture, 

Memorandum. There is belonginge to the Curate of Homington afore- 
said which is reserved by the Lessee 1 by the Indenture before mentioned a 
howse sometyme called the Viccaridge howse together with a Backside 
Orchard and Garden with th' appurtenances oblations christnings chuch- 
ings and Burialls and xx 11 per annum, being a stipend allotted and allowed 
by the Lessors to be paid by the Lessee out of the reserved Rent pro vt 
apparet by the Abstract of the Lease before recited. All which is worth 
per annum xx 11 . The present curate there is Mr. Roger Hewlett. 

An Abstract of the present Rents future Improvements and all other 
profitts of the said parsonage and mannour of Homington. The reserued 
Rent vpon the said Indentures of Lease payable by the Lessee beinge the 
only present profitt payable to the state the curates salary of xx 11 . being 
allowed accordinge to the direction and lymitacion mencioned in the said 
Indenture is per annum x 11 . The Rent of Assize or the rent of the saide 
Coppyehold Tenement is per annum xxiij 8 . 

The Improvement of the Parsonage <fc Tenement before mencioned over 
and above the yearly rent reserued is per annum lvij 11 . xiij 8 . 

The improvement of the copyhold Tenement over and above the yearly 
Rent reserved is per annum xij u . 

Returned (amongst other things) to the Registere office for keepinge the 
Surveys of Deane & Chapters Lands the 11th of March 1649 : by Wat r . Foy, 
John Squibb, Chr r Weare George Faireley Surveyors. Ra: Hall Regist. Dep*. 

2 Wilts. Combe and Harneham Prebend. A Survey of the 
Prebend and Parsonages of Combe and Harneham with all the rights mem- 
bers and appurtenances thereof scituate lyeinge and beeinge in Com. Wilts 
late parcell of the possessions or late belonginge to John Chappell clarke 

1 sic. Query Lessor intended. 
2 Lambeth Pari. Surveys, Vol. XV., pp. 268—275. 



Communicated by the Ven. Archdeacon E. J. Bodington. 311 

late Prebendarie of the said Prebend within the Cathedrall Church of the 
Virgine Mary of Sarum in the sayde Countye of Wilts made and taken by 
vs whose names are hereunto subscribed in the monethe of Februarye 1649. 
By virtue of a commission to vs granted, grounded vppon an Acte of the 
Commons of England (&c, as above). 

[Coombe Bisset] There is belonginge to the sayde parsonage certaine 
Tythe Hey and the Tythe of all the corne and Graine ariseinge, renewinge 
and groweinge withine the parrishe of Combe aforesayde (except only the 
Tythe of about 30 Acres of the Gleabe Lands which is yearely sowen and 
and payed to the Viccar there) soe that the Tythe payed yearely to the 
sayd Parsonage valued communibus annis per annum is cxx 11 . 

The Advowson right of patronage and presentation to the viccarage of 
Combe aforesaid did belonge to the sayde Prebend now to the State. . . 
The Viccarage there is worth per annum xl u . The present Viccar is Mr. 
Hector Carpenter. 

The Rectorie or Parsonage of Harnham. 1 There is belonginge 
to the sayde Parsonage the Tythe of all Corne and Graine, Hey Wooll 
Lambe,and all other Tythes whatsoever ariseinge, groweinge and reneweinge 
withine the sayde Parrishe valued per annum cxx 11 . 

All which premisses That is to say All that the Prebend and Parsonage 

of Combe and Harneham alias Combe Harnham alias Harneham and Combe 

in the Countye of Wilts with all and singuler the appurtenances and every 

of them, with all houses Edifices, buildings Gleabe Lands, Tenementes, 

Meadowes Leasues, Pastures, and Feedings with all and singular thap- 

purtenances to the saydePrebend andParsonage or either of them belonginge 

or appertayneing or accepted or reputed or taken vsed occupied or demised 

as parte parcell or member of the sayde Prebend and Parsonages or any 

or either of them together with all and all manner of Tythes, oblacions, 

Fruites, emoluments profitts commodities, Rentes and services, and all 

and all other hereditaments whatsoever they are with thappurtenances to 

the Prebend or Parsonage or to either of them or any of them belonginge 

or appertayneinge or heretofore accepted, reputed taken used, or enjoyed 

to or with the same or either of them, or as parte parcell or member of 

them, or either of them or any of them (The Mannor of Rascombe 

Northbury in the County of Berks with all Landes Tenements Revercions 

services woods underwoods preheminences and other hereditaments to the 

sayde Mannour of Rascombe Northbury belonginge withine the sayde 

countye of Berks and the presentacion, Avowcion freeguift and disposicion 

of the Viccaridge of Combe Byssett in the sayde Countye of Wilts and all 

probacions of Testaments and all other jurisdictions Ecclesiasticall within 

the sayde Prebend and Parsonages and withine every of them excepted and 

vnto John Chappell and his successors allwayes reserved) were per Indent- 

uram datam 10° Aprilis 6° Caroli demised by John Chappell Clarke 

Prebendary of the Prebend of Combe and Harneham alias Harneham and 

Combe withine the Cathedrall Church of the Virgine Mary of Sarum in 

Com. Wilts vnto John Penruddocke of Compton Chamberlaine in the 

1 West Harnham. 



312 The Church Survey in Wilts, 1649—50. 

sayde County e of Wiltes Esqr. and William Smeggergill Vicar Chorall of 
the sayde Cathedrall Church of Sarum. 

Habendum the premisses (except as before excepted) vnto them and their 
heires for the Terme of the Liues of Elizabeth Chappell wife of the said 
John Chappell and John Chappell and Edward Chappell sonnes of the 
sayde John Chappell, for the vse of the sayde Elizabeth 
Redditus Chappell John Chappell and Edward Chappell and 

xxx 11 . iij s . iiij d . the longest liver of them vnder the yearely rent of 

xxxii 11 . iij 8 . iiij d . att the Feasts of St. Michaell the Ark- 
angell and the Annunciation of the Virgine Mary or withine 14 dayes next 
after the sayde Feasts by even porcions. But are worth vppon Improve- 
ment over and above the sayde Rent per annum ccliij 11 . ix s . 

If the sayde yearely Rent be vnpayed by the space of one moneth 
beinge lawfully demaunded then the Lessees are to forfeite 40 s . nomine 
penoe att every such time as the same shall bee vnpayed by the space of 
one moneth for which as for the said Rent a distresse. 
which as for the said Rent a distresse. 

The Lessor doth couenante to paye all manner of Tythes, dismes, and 
subsidies graunted or to be graunted to the Kinge or his Successors out of 
or by reason of the premisses. 

The Lessees are to pay and discharge the procuracions due and to bee due 
and all stall wages due to the Viccars or to be due dureinge the Terme, to 
the Viccars Chorall of the sayde Church of Sarum. And alsoe provide a 
sufficiente Minister att theire owne proper costs and charges for the Church 
and Chappell of Harneham aforesaid. And alsoe to repayre all edifices, 
buildinges and Chauncells together with all hedges, ditches and fences on 
the premisses, And the Lessees doe alsoe covenante thatitt shall be lawefull 
for the Viccar of Combe Bissett aforesaid and his successors for the time 
beinge dureing the terme yearely att or within the time of Harvest to take 
receive and enjoye to his owne vse the yearely Tythe of 15 Acres of Wheate 
and 15 Acres of Barley of suche as shall yearlye growe on the Gleabe Landes 
of the Parsonage of Combe, when and as often as there shall be soe many 
Acres there sown, And for default thereof that then the residue soe lackinge 
shall bee payed and taken by the sayde Viccar of Combe and his successors 
of the Wheate and Barley that shall bee growen vppon other lands sowen 
withine the sayde Parrish of Combe soe as the sayde Viccar and his 
successors Viccars of Combe aforesaid doe well and truely content 
and paye vnto the sayde Lessees, or their Assignes yeareley from yeare to 
yeare dureinge the sayde terme on the 4th day of October att the Church 
or Chappell of Harneham aforesaid 1 the yearely rent of xiij s . iiij d . for the 
same Tythes. And that the sayd Lessees or one of them shall yearely 
three times in every yeare dureinge the sayde Terme entertaine the Lessor 
and his Successors with his or their twoe men and three 
Entertaynm' horses att the Parsonage Howse of Harneham or att 

communibus some other conveniente howse withine the Close or 

Annis. xl s . Cittye of New Sarum, Findeinge to them vppon con- 

venient warneinge sufficiente meate Drincke and Lodge- 
inge for themselves theire servants and horses for and by the space of twoe 



Communicated by the Ven. Archdeacon E. J. Bodington. 313 

dayes and two nights only att every of the sayde Three times in the yeare. 

The Lessor doth covenante for quiett enjoyeinge, etc. Twoe of the lives in 

beeing Elizabeth Chappell aged fortye yeares and Edward Twenty yeares. 

The xxxij u . iij s . iiij d . reserved on this Prebend is thus apporcioned vizt. 

To bee sold with the Lands is 05. 03. 04 

To remayne vpon the Tythes is 27. 00. 00 



In toto 32. 03. 04 



Nov. 25th 1650 Will Webb. - 

Returned (amongst other thinges) into the Regist 13 Office for keepinge 
the Surveyes of Deanes and Chapters Lands the 23 th of Aprill, 1650. By 
Walt. Foy John Squibb Chr.Weare Geo. Fairley Surveyours. Ex d Ra. Hall 
Regist. Dept. 

Wiltes 1 Britford Kectoria. A Survey of the Rectory impropriate 
of Brittford in Com. Wilts with the rights members and appurtenances 
thereof late parcell of the possessions or late belonginge to the late Deane 
a,nd Chapter of the Cathedrall Church of the Virgin Marye of Sarum made 
and taken by vs whose names are herevnto subscribed in the moneth of 
March 1649. By vertue of a commission to vs granted grounded upon an 
Act of the Commons of England assembled (&c, as above). 

All that the Parsonage house of Brittford aforesaid consisting of a Hall 
a Parlour a kitchin a Buttery a Larder a Brewhouse a Colehouse six 
Chambers and two Garrettes a stable a Heyhouse or a Fodderhouse ad- 
joyning to the Stable of foure bayes of building, a Barne of seaven bays, a 
Graynary a courtyard Backside and Garden an Orchard and Willowbed 
containing per estimacion 01. 02. vj 11 . xiij*. iiij d . 

One close of Pasture called by the name of the Furne Close adjoyning 
to the Orchard of the Parsonage house cont. per estimacion 02. 02 
iij 11 . xv 8 . 

One close of meadow called the Parsonage Meade adjoyning to the 
aforesaid close of Pasture <fc to the Garden of the said Parsonage house 
containing per estimacion 05. 00 x 11 . 

One close of Pasture called the dry close or Barne close adjoyning to the 
Parsonage Barne aforesaid cont. per estimation 01. 01. xxxvij 9 . vj rl . 

One close of Pasture called the Church close adjoyning to a close be- 
longing to S r . Thomas Jervice called the Conygeere cont. per estim. 03. 00. 
iiij". x s . 

One close of pasture called Boyer's Close on the West side of a lane 
deviding it from the fore-named close called the Barne Close, cont. per estim. 
01. 00. xxxvij 8 . vi d . 

Two litle Closes of Pasture lying remote from the Parsonage house at a 
certaine place called the Vpende adioyning to a feild of arrable belonging 
to the Lord of Curlayne &, lyeing on the east side of the said feild cont. per 
estimation 01. 00. xxx s . 

The foreshare of certaine Meadows lying dispersedly in the comon meade 
of Brittford containing per estimacion 02. 00. x 11 . 

1 Lambeth Pari. Surveys, Vol. XV., pp. 171—172. 
VOL. XL. — NO. CXXX. 2 A 



314 The Church Survey in Wilts, 1649—50. 

One parcel of arrable lying in the feild called the Ryalls containing per 
estimacion 00. 02. v s . 

Totall number of Acres — — -36. 00. 40 1 *. 08 s . 04 d . 

One meane cottage being a bouse and garden taken out of the close of 
pasture called the dry close or Barne Close in the tenure of Thomas Prewett 
cont. per estimacion 00. 01 . xxvj s . viij d . 

One meane cottage being a house and garden taken out of the close of 
Pasture called Bowyers Close in the tenure of .Mr. Eastman .cont. per 
estimacion 00. 01. xx s . 

There belongeth to the parsonage of Brittford aforesaid the tythe of all 
corne and grayne growing and renewinge yearly within the said parish 
consisting of the villages of Brittford East Harnham and Langford(excepting 
the tythes of corne and graine growing and renewing yearly vpon one 
acre and a halfe of land in Britford the tythe whereof belongeth to the 
Viccar of Britford and of another acre and halfe of land in Britford the 
tythe whereof belongeth to the owner of the Tythes of some part of Langford 
Farme and excepting likewise the tythe of some parte of Langford Farme) 
and there belongs also to the parsonage of Brittford aforesaid the tythe of 
all hey growing yearly in the common meades of Brittford and in the West 
mead and in a meade called Ax-meade when mowed all which tythes be- 
longing to the Parsonage aforesaid is worth per annum clx l1 . 

All which premises are held and enjoyed by George Kickwitch of 
Catchfrencth in the County of Cornwall Esq r . by vertue of a lease as wee 
are informed granted by the late Deane and Chapter of 
This lease to be Sarum vnto Edward Stockman of Birtford esquire since 
produced within deceased whose relict & widdow the said George 
the time limited. Kickwitch did mary by vertue of which mariage he 
doth hold and enjoy the premisses but hath produced 
noe Lease vnto vs as yett. 

The Presentacion of the Viccar was in the Deane and Chapter now in 
the State. The Viccaridge worth per annum l u . The present Incumbent 
is Mr. Edward Fawkener. [Witnesses] Chr. Weare. George Fairely. 
Walt. Foy. Jo. Squibb. 

Wiltes. 1 The Portion of the Tythes of Langford. 2 A Survey of the 
portion of Tything of Langford in the County of Wilts now the lands of the 
Earl of Colraigne, or late belonging to the late Deane & Cannons of the Free 
Chappell of St. George within the Castle of Windsor made & taken by 
vs whose names are herevnto subscribed in the month of March 1650 . By 
vertue of a commission to vs graunted grounded vpon an Acte of the 
Commons of England assembled in Parliament (&c, as above). 

Annual rents reserved. 

Cleere values & Improvements per Annum. 

All that portion of Tythes of Lanford yssueing out of all the sommer corne 
& hay of certaine landes lying and beinge within the parrish of Burford 3 
in the said County of Wilts now the landes of the Earle of Colraigne (vizt.) 
out of Millfeild Ar. cont. by estimation 23 Acres, out of Middlefeild Ar. 

1 Lambeth Pari. Surveys, vol. xvi., pp. 190. 2 Longford. 3 Britford- 



Communicated by the Yen. Archdeacon E. J. Bodington, 315 

containing by estimation 24 acres, out of Kingsmeale feild containing by 
estimation 23 acres, out of part of part of Burford feild ar. containing by 
estimation 12 Acres, out of Pike mead containing by estimation 8 Acres, 
out of Broad Mead containing by estimation 14 Acres, and out of Mill 
Mead conteyning by estimation 6 acres The yearly vallue of the said 
tythinge is reputed to bee worth communibus annis xij" 
Noe lease produced. This Lease to bee produced. 



CHALKE HUNDRED. 

Wiltes. 1 Ebbesborne Hectoria. A Survey of the Rectory and 
Parsonage of Ebbesborne Wake with all the rights members and appur- 
tenances thereof scituate and being in Com. Wiltes late parcell of the 
possessions or late belonging to Francis South clerke late Sub-chaunter 
of the Cathedral 1 Church of the Virgin Marie of Sarum made and taken 
in the month of February 1649 by vs whose are herevnto subscribed by 
virtue of a commission to vs granted grounded vppon an act of the Com- 
mons of England assembled in Parliament for the abolishing of Deanes 
(&c, as above). 

Annuall rents reserved. Cleare vallues and Improvements per annum. 

All that Parsonage or dwellinge house conteyning a Hall, a Butterie two 
chambers over a barne of 3 bayes of building a little Garden togeather with 
a parcell of meadowe or backside therevnto adjoyninge conteyning in toto 
per estimacion 02. 00. v n . 

One parcell of meadowe in the common meadowe of Ebbesborne afore- 
said adjoininge to an acre of meadowe there belonginge to the parsonage 
of Broadchalke conteyning per estimation 00. 02. xxx s . 

Certaine parcells of arr. land lyinge dispersedly in the common feild of 
Ebbesborne contayning per estimacion 40. 00. xv 11 

A certaine parcell of ground and coppice lying and being in Cranborne 
Chase conteyning per estimacion 04. 00. xiij s . iiij d . 

Totall number of acres 46. 02. xxij 1! . iij s . iiij d . 

There is belonginge to the said Parsonage The Tythe of the Moytie or 
halfendeale of all the come and graine growen within the said Parrish of 
Ebbesborne (th'other moytie thereof belonginge to a Priory there) which 
moytie belonginge to the said parsonage is vallued per annum lxxx 1! . 

There is belonginge to the said Parsonage the Tythe of Hey growen 
within the said Parrish of aboute 50 acres per estimacion vallued per 
annum vij 11 . x s . 

There belongeth alsoe to the said Parsonage all the Tyth of Wooll and 
Lambe groweinge and renewinge yearely within the said parrish togeather 
with all small tythes arisinge there worth per annum xx 11 . 

There is alsoe belonginge therevnto pasture for 140 sheepe in the common 
feilds and Downes of the said Parrish which is vallued with the arrable 
lands before mencioned. 

1 Lambeth Pari. Surveys, Vol. XV., pp. 181—183. 

2 A 2 



316 The Church Survey in Wilts, 1649—50. 

Alsoe common of Pasture on the same feilds and downes for sixe rathour 
beastes and 3 horses vallued per annum xxij s . vj d . 

Sum total is cxxx". xv». x d . 

The Minister there is a Stipendarie and to be provided and paid his 
wages by the Lessee as appeareth by his covenant. 

All which premisses that is to sale all that the Rectorie & Parsonage of 
Ebbesborne Wake and all manner of houses Edifices, buildings Glebe landes 
meadowes leauses pastures common of pasture Tithes oblaciones profitts,ob- 
vencions commodities emolumentes hereditamentes with all and singuler 
their appurtenaunces to the said Rectorie and Parsonage belonginge or in any 
wise apperteyninge or with the sameRectorie and premisses or with any part 
or parcell thereof vsuallie occupied or enjoyed and all that copice of wood and 
woodie ground with th'appurtenaunces belongingeto thesaidRectorie orSub- 
ehauntershipp of the Cathedral Church of 8arum cont. per estimacion iiij 
acres be it more or lesselying and being in Cranborne Chase were by Inden- 
ture dated 3 t0 Septembris 1639 15 Caroli demised by Francis South clerke 
Subchaunter of the Cathedrall Church of Sarum and parson of theParsonage 
and parrish Church of Ebbesborne Wake in the Countie of Wiltes to the same 
office of Subchaunterchipp appropriate vnited and annexed vnto Thomas 
Baskett of Dwillish in the Countie of Dorsett Esqr, and John Bingham of 
Quarleston in the said County of Dorset Gent. Habendum vnto them and 
their assignes for the lives of Bridgett Baskett sister of the said Thomas 
Basket, and Robert Baskett, and of Thomas and Marie Basket son and 
daughter of Robert Basket and the longest liver of them the said Bridget 
Thomas and Marie vnder the yearely rent of viij 11 . & iiij d . at the feasts of 
th'annunciation of the Virgin Marie and St. Michaell The Arch-Angell by 
even porcions but are worth vppon Ymprovement over and above the said 
rent per annum cxxij H . xv s yj d . 

The Leassees for themselves and their assignes doe covenant to build 
repaire make and amend the Mansion house of the said Parsonage with all 
other houses edifices and buildinges belonginge to the Parsonage duringe 
the Terme and soe to leave it and also duringe the said terme at their owne 
proper costes and charges to find one sufficient able minister Curate or 
Chaplin from tyme [to tyme] 1 to serve the cure of Ablesborne (sic) Wake 
and alsoe to paie all Tenthes fifteenthes subsidies proxes Synodalls and 
all other charges, ordinary and extraordinary whatsoever to bee paid and 
goeing out of the premisses as well to the Kinge and his successors as to 
the Bishopp of Sarum Archdeacon or anie other Person whatsoever (First- 
fruites for the said Parsonage thereafter to bee due only excepted) and 
alsoe all the said Terme to keepe and preserve the Hedges and boundes of 
the Coppice aforesaid soe farr as it may bee donne by the custome or the 
lawe within the said Chace. And after anie fallinge of the wood of the 
same coppice shall preserve and keepe the springs of the same wood from 
hurt and spoyle soe longe tyme as the same ought to be kept & preserved 
by the lawes and Statutes of the Realme. And in the end of the terme 
shall leave it soe preserved. 

If the rent bee behind by the space of 6 weekes then a reentrey. 

1 Omitted in MS. 



Communicated by the Ven. Archdeacon E. J, Bodington. 317 

All the lives in beinge Bridgett aged 32 Thomas 12 and Marie 13. 

The estate in the premises is now in Mr. William Penny of Ebbesborne 
aforesaid. {[Witnesses] Wat. Foy Jo. Squibb Chr. Weare Geo. Fairley. 
Exam, per Will. Webb Supervisor Generall 1649. 

Dates from endorsement :— Recept 11 Martii 1649. Transmiss : Supervis: 
General die supradicto. Revers. 14. Martii 1649. Rec. Junii 18. 1650. 

Retorn'd into the Registers office for keepenge the Survayes 
of Deanes & Chapters lands the 20th May 1650. 
Davys Taylor William Stisted Edmond Mountjoy Henry Langley Surveyors. 

Ex. per Will. Webb. 1650. Exr. Ra: Hall. Registr. Depnt. 



[To be continued.] 



318 



WILTSHIEE NEWSPAPERS— PAST AND PRESENT. 

Part III. 1 
THE NEWSPAPERS OF SOUTH WILTS. 

By Mrs. Herbert Richardson, B.A., sometime Scholar of St. Hugh's 
College, Oxford. 

The history of the South Wilts newspapers forms an interesting 
and important section of the larger history of the newspapers of 
the county as a whole. It is proposed to deal .with this section as 
exhaustively as available data admit, treating not only of the 
actual newspapers, on a strict definition, which once existed or 
still exist in the southern part of the county,, but also of such 
periodical publications as have appeared from time to time, which, 
though not quite technically newspapers, are yet on the border 
line of the definition and have real interest from the journalistic, 
historical, or political point of view. 

Allowing this latitude of definition, the subject may be grouped 
under four distinct headings : — 

1. The earliest Wiltshire newspaper, and other short-lived 

Salisbury papers of the eighteenth century. 

2. The oldest existing Wiltshire newspaper — the Salisbury 

and Winchester Journal. 
3. The Salisbury Times and other Salisbury papers of the. 

nineteenth century. 
4. Wilton and Warminster papers. 

1. The earliest Wiltshire newspaper, and other short-lived 
Salisbury papers of the eighteenth century. 

Salisbury papers of the eighteenth century. — 

The Salisbury Post Man (1715—16 c), 

The Detector (1786—7), 

The County Magazine (1786—92). 

The Salisbury Postman (1715 — 16 c.) 

1 For Parts I. and II., by Mr. J. J. Slade, see Wilts. Arch. Maq., 
xl., pp. 37— 74, 129—141. 



Wiltshire Newspapers — Past and Present. 319 

The earliest Wiltshire newspaper, The Salisbury Post Man, a small 
folio publication of 1715 — 16 c, of which only two copies are 
known to exist, has an interest out of all proportion to its size and 
scanty file. The two existing copies 1 are both duplicates of the 
first number, the one perfect, the olhei minus its last leaf. Hatcher, 
in his History of Salisbury, 2 mentions a copy "in my possession" 
of "No. 40 for March 1st, 1716," but all efforts to trace this later 
number have proved fruitless. From the available copies of the 
first number and from other sources, it is, however, possible to 
piece together some facts concerning this important early provincial 
newspaper and its enterprising promoter, Samuel Farley. 

The Salisbury Post Man is a small folio publication, measuring 
11J inches by 7, identical in size with the oldest of all existing 
English newspapers (as it was at that date), The London Gazette^ 
but containing a sheet and a half instead of The Gazettes usual 
half-sheet, six pages instead of two. The reverse of the title-page 
is blank, but the other pages are printed in two columns with a 
five-eighths of an inch wide margin to the page. The type is bold 
but dirty, a defect for which the printer apologises in a naive 
postscript on his last page: — " N.B, You are desirM not to take 
Notice of the Foulness of the Character, having received theDamage 
in carriage and will take some time for cleaning. Vale!" The 
paper itself is hand-made, thick and of fair quality, the lines marked 
by the sewing-wires about an inch apart, and is further water- 
marked 3 by a large device of a shield bearing crossed bdtons tipped 
\m\\\ fleurs-de-lis, enclosed in two acanthus leaves and surmounted 
by a crown. The ornamentations of the title-page are the con- 
ventional newspaper wood-cuts (a little " damaged," like the type), 
on the left a mounted post man, whipping up his horse, and on 
the right a three-masted ship in full sail. The title-page itself 
runs as follows : — 

The / Salisbury / Postman : / Or / Packet of Intelligence / 
From / France, Spain, Portugal etc. / Saturday, Sept. 27th, 

1 In the possession of Messrs. Bennett Bros., proprietors of The Salisbury 
and Winchester Journal. * Chapter XLII. 

3 Watermark only visible in incomplete copy, which is much damaged. 



320 Wiltshire Newspapers — Past and Present. 

1715 (No. 11) / %* This Paper contains an Abstract of all 
the most Material Occurences / of the whole Week, Foreign 
and Domestick: And will be continued every / Post, provided 
a sufficient Number will Subscribe for its Encouragement. / 
If 200. Subscribe, it shall be Deliver'd to any Private or 
Publick House in / Town, every Manday, Thursday, and 
Saturday Morning, by Eight of the / Clock, during the Winter- 
Season ; and by Six in the Summer ; for / Three- Half- Pence 
each, / Any Person in the Country may order it by the Post, 
Coach, Carriers, or / Market People; to whom they shall be 
carefully Deliver'd, / It shall be always Printed in a Sheet 
and a half, and on as good Paper; but / this containing the 
whole Week's News can't be afforded under 2d. / Note / 
For Encouragement to all those that may have Occasion to 
Enter / Advertisements, this Paper will be made Publick in 
every Market / Town forty Miles distant from this City ; and 
several will be / sent as far as Exeter. / Besides the News, 
we Perform all other Matters / belonging to our Art and 
Mistery ; whether in / Latin, Greek, Hebrew, Algebra, Mathemaf 
ticks &c, / 

Printed by Sam. Farley, at his Office adjoyning to / Mr. 
Robert Silcocks, on the Ditch in Sarum, / Anno 1715. 
Salisbury was fortunate in acquiring a local newspaper at so 
early a date. The English county press was in 1715 hardly out 
of its infancy. In most localities news was still conveyed through 
the medium of the written newsletter, which the county gentleman 
of means received weekly from the office of some professional 
London newswriter, 1 while the poor provincial was mainly de- 
pendent on the few London papers to be seen at the local coffee- 
houses, at the bookseller's, and at the barber's, or on what his 
relatives in town might send him. 2 But in 1695 the severe 
Printing Act of 1661 (limiting presses to London, York, and the 

1 Such an office as Henry Muddiman, the journalist who first started 
The London Gazette for Sir J. Williamson, Secretary of State, established 
in the reign of Charles II. at the Seven Stars in the Strand. 

2 " We could have Gazettes then, and Dawks Letter and the Weekly 
Bilir— Sir Wilful Witwoud in Congreve's Way of the World, 1700. 



By Mrs. Herbert Richardson, 321 

two Universities, and otherwise restricting the provincial printer) 
had finally lapsed, never to be renewed. And since that date a 
demand for news had been arising throughout provincial England 
which was bound sooner or later to be supplied. It was a demand 
which took the form of an absorbing interest in contemporary 
politics, due mainly to the growth of the Jacobite cause, and to the 
possibility of an invasion which might at any moment change the 
centre of political interest from London and the battlefields of the 
Netherlands to the English counties. This imperative demand for 
news the pioneers of provincial journalism, such men as Bonny of 
Bristol or Bliss of Exeter, strove with more or less success to 
meet: and among them few embarked on more gallant ventures 
or made more mark on early provincial history than Samuel Farley, 
the promoter of The Salisbury Post Man. His career is of sufficient 
interest to follow in detail. 

The earliest member of the Farley family who can be traced is 
Thomas Farley, of Bosbury, near Ledbury, in Herefordshire, 1 His 
son James was apprenticed at Bristol to Thomas Chester on August 
16th, 1559, and took the freedom of the city in 1568. He was 
buried at St. John's, Bristol, in November, 1605, his wife having 
died June 13th, 1598. George Farley was also buried there in 
1566. 

On September 5th, 1664, one Jerome Farley was bound apprentice 
to the Stationers' Company in London. It is not possible to es- 
tablish a connection between this Jerome and the Bristol Farleys, 
though the presumption is that he was a member of the same 
family. If so, we may take the presence of his name among the 

1 No writer on the newspaper has dealt at any length with the life of 
Samuel Farley. Existing authorities are: — Dr. Oliver's brief article, No. 
13 of Exon Biographies in Trewmans Exeter ft'lying Post, Feb. 15th, 1849 ; 
another short biography in Dr. T. N. Brushfield's Life and Bibliography of 
Andrew Brice ; and the Rev. John Ingle Dredge's Devon Booksellers and 
Printers (a valuable list of Devon-printed works). Additional data are 
here supplied by a study and comparison of the existing Farley papers, and 
those by which they were influenced or on whose lines they were modelled, 
in the British Museum, Bristol Public Library, Exeter Public Library, and 
Library of the Devon and Exeter Institution ; and by research in the 
Stationers' Kail Records. 



322 Wiltshire Newspapers — Past and Present. 

Stationers' Becords at this early date as an additional proof that 
printer's ink was in the Farley blood. Jerome did not, however, 
later become a member of the company, and whatever his printing 
activities in the early years of Charles II. 's reign may have been, 
they could not, under the provisions of the Printing Act, have 
been exercised in the provinces. Neither could they have included 
any newspaper work, for the newspaper was then practically a 
Government monopoly 1 and the written newsletter consequently a 
far more potent agent for the dissemination of news than the 
journal. 

At what date the Farley family moved to Devonshire is also 
unknown. A modern descendant of Samuel Farley claims him as 
a Devonshire man, and there were certainly Farleys in Devonshire 
by the early years of the eighteenth century. The will of John 
Farley, of East Ogwell, Devon, was proved in 1710, and that of 
Henry Farley, of North Tawton, Devon, in 1718. While St. Paul's 
register, Exon, 2 has the entry, "Sarah, daughter of Samuel Farley, 
baptized 16th October, 1699"; and St. Martin's, Exon, "Samuel, 
sou of Mr. Edward Farley, baptized 20th October, 1727; Samuel 
Farley, buried November 1st, 1727." 

Samuel Farley himself was established as a printer at Exeter 
before the close of the seventeenth century. In 1698 he printed, 
as partner with Samuel Darker, a Sermon preached at Dartmouth 
on July 24th, 1698, by the Rev. Hunifry Smith. The partnership 
probably began in that year, as other works of 1698 bear Darker's 
name only, and continued till 1700, the joint names of the two 
appearing in 1699 and 1700, after which date Darker's name 
disappears. 

In 1701 Farley printed the first edition of Prince's Worthies of 
Devon. This was a folio edition, tastefully and clearly printed, 
with excellent cuts of the coats of arms of the various families 
dealt with, and was the most important work that had yet issued 

1 Roger L'Estrange was in 1663 given the sole right of issuing the news- 
books, though his Intelligence and Newes were soon crushed by Henry 
Muddiman's semi-official London Gazette. 

2 Mr. R. Dymond. 



By Mrs. Herbert Richardson. 323 

from the Exeter Press. Its title-page — " Exeter, printed by Sam 
Farley for Awnsham and John Churchill at the Black Swan in 
Pater-Noster How, London, and Charles Yeo and Philip Bishop 
iu Exou." — shows the beginning of Farley's long connection 
with Philip Bishop, established as a bookseller at Exeter since 
1697, for whom he printed almost continuously until 1714, and 
with whom he was closely connected in his second newspaper 
venture. Farley's association with Bishop did not, however, prevent 
his working for other Exeter booksellers, or, at times, in partnership 
with other Exeter printers. Iu 1707 he printed, in partnership 
with with Jos. Bliss, two pamphlets, " A True and Impartiall 
Account of what occurred at the late Conference at Exon," and 
"A Defence of the Impartiall Account": while in 1708 Bliss 
printed Part I. and Farley Part II. of another controversial 
pamphlet entitled "The Plain Truth." It was this short partner- 
ship with Bliss which probably gave Farley his first insight into 
newspaper work, and directed his abilities into the channel they 
afterwards took. Bliss, an Exeter printer and coffee-house pro- 
prietor, was the producer of the earliest known Exeter newspaper, 
which also has the honour of being one of the oldest English pro- 
vincial papers. Of this paper, Jos. Bliss s Exeter Post Boy, one 
known copy ("Friday, May 4th, 1711, No. 211 ") exists, 1 and it 
is by counting back from this date that we arrive at 1707, the 
year in which Farley was certainly working with Bliss, as the 
probable date of the paper's inception. 

The whole question as to which is the earliest provincial news- 
paper is somewhat controversial; but, as there is a strong proba- 
bility that Farley was connected with one and influenced by 
another of the four earliest papers of this description, it may be 
worth summarizing here. 2 It must first be noted that the method 
of arriving at the date of a newspaper's first issue by numbering 
back from an existing copy is by no means reliable. The early 
newspapers not only constantly renumbered in the most confusing 

1 In the British Museum. 

2 The deductions of Mr. J. B. Williams are mainly followed in this 
summary, with some independent conclusions. 



324 Wiltshire Newspapers — Past and Present. 

way, but often issued irregularly, so that a number cannot be 
certainly regarded as representing a week. Where ib is possible 
to compare an earlier number with a later, it will often be found 
that the method of counting back understates rather than overstates 
the age of a paper, a renumbering starting at 1 when some thirty 
or fifty issues of the paper have already appeared. When, however, 
no other evidence exists, the method of numbering back is the 
only practicable one for arriving at a paper's date, and it must be 
applied to two of the journals laying claim to be the oldest English 
provincial newspaper. The claims of The Worcester Postman to date 
from 1690 and The Stamford Mercury from 1695 can be dismissed 
at once. Under the provisions of the Printing Act no press could 
possibly have existed at Worcester in 1690, while 1695, the year 
of the final lapsing of the act, can hardly have seen the immediate 
establishment of a provincial newspaper. The earliest provincial 
newspapers are, moreover, Jacobite, 1 and no such paper would have 
been allowed to appear in 1695 when the policy of the Glorious 
Eevolution was at its strongest. It is to the closing years of 
William III/s reign and the early years of Queen Anne that we 
must look for the establishment of the provincial press. The 
Norwich Post, printed by E. Burgess, has first claim. Its earliest 
extant issue is No. 348, April 24th — May 1st, 1708; and by 
counting back we arrive at September, 1701, as its birth-date. 
Next comes Sonny's Bristol Post Boy, of which the earliest known 
copy 2 is No. 91, for August 12th, 1704. This gives November, 
1702, as the probable date of its first appearance. Crossgroves 
Norwich Gazette, of 1706, for long the earliest known provincial 
paper, comes third. And Jos. Bliss's Exeter Post Boy, assumed as 
dating from 1707 for reasons already given, has the fourth place. 
A letter of Dr. Tanner's (later Bishop of St. Asaph), 3 written in 
1706, says, "I am told they print also a weekly paper at Exeter," 

1 Bliss's Post Boy, with its portrait of Queen Anne, may have been an 
exception. Bliss was later certainly a] Whig (Dr. Brushfield's Life of 
Andrew Brice). 

2 In the possession of Miss Georgina Taylor, of Bristol. Four issues only 
apparently now exist. 

3 In the Bodleian Library. 



By Mrs, Herbert Richardson. 325 

this, if the Doctor was correctly informed, may have been an un- 
known paper earlier than Bliss's ; but, judging from the unre- 
liability of early numbering and the fact already referred to that 
the counting- back method often post-dates rather than antedates 
a paper, it was quite probably Bliss s Post Boy, which may date 
from earlier than 1707. It will be seen from the above summary 
that the paper with the surest claim to rank as the earliest English 
provincial newspaper is Bonny s Bristol Post Boy} The claims of 
its earlier rival are based on conjecture, but of the Bristol Post Boy 
an actual copy exists fully two years earlier in date than those of 
any similar newspaper extant. By this paper, also, Farley was 
probably influenced, so that his newspaper ventures are in touch 
with the earliest efforts of English provincial journalism. 

It is surely safe to assume that Farley's partnership with Bliss 
must have given him some insight into the working of Bliss's Post 
Boy — possibly he had at times a hand in the printing of this 
earliest Exeter paper — and turned his thoughts in the direction of 
newspaper enterprise in which he and his descendants were so 
signally to succeed. The Exeter Post Boy was a weekly half-sheet 
in folio (13J inches by 7 J inches), printed at the promoter's Coffee- 
House, The Exchange, in St. Peter's Church-yard, and adorned on 
the left of its title by a wood-cut of Queen Anne and on the right 
by one of the arms of the city. It was of course modelled, as 
were all the early provincial papers, on the London Post Man, 
Post Boy, and Flying Post, well-known and important papers, all 
dating from 1695. Each of these papers was by this date orna- 
mented with cuts to right and left of the title— Fame with a 
trumpet, an editor in his chair, a mounted postman, or a ship in 
full sail — and this style of ornamentation Bliss adopted, and with 
some originality adapted, while Farley was to follow it more closely 
later. 

The Bliss partnership does not seem to have lasted long, however. 
In 1709 Farley was printing independently at an address " over 
against the New Inn in High Street, Exon." And in 1711 he 



1 Mr.. Charles Wells, of The Bristol Times and Mirror, first drew at- 
tention to the existence of this important early newspaper. 



326 Wiltshire Newspapers — Past and Present. 

produced a quarto edition by Beynolds of Pomponius Mela (De 
Situ Orbis, etc), illustrated with twenty-five maps; an accurate 
and tasteful piece of work which may rank with his Worthies of 
Devon. In this year also he registered one production with the 
Stationers' Company, whose records, under April 11th, 1711, have, 
" Sam Farley, Then entred for his copy An Account of the Life and 
Actions of Grace Hooper, the Famous Female Roller who was executed 
at Dorchester on Saturday March ihe 24th, 1711." This was the 
only work he so protected. It probably had a much larger sale 
than De Situ Orlis, and its issue points to the fact that Farley was 
already acquiring something of the flair of the newspaper man, the 
sure knowledge of what the public wants and is prepared to buy. His 
character, as far as one may read it in his work, presents indeed 
an attractive blend of shrewdness and ingenuousness. He is now 
the honest craftsman, delighting in good work for its own sake ; 
now the hard-headed man of business, producing only what will 
pay. And all his enterprises are dashed with a certain vigour and 
daring not unworthy of the gallant Venturers of the city with 
which his family had already been and was to be yet more closely 
associated. 

In 1 713 he must have left Exeter for a while to pursue the first, 
and finally the most successful, of these newspaper ventures. 
Perhaps there were friends or relatives still left in Bristol whom 
he wished to see. Perhaps he may have heard that there was an 
opening there for another paper besides, or in the place of, Bonny s 
Bristol Post Boy. This is of course conjecture. The facts are 
these. The Kev. Ingle Dredge's records of Exeter printing show 
only two works issuing from Farley's press in 1713, a 
Sermon preached at Truro on April 30th, 1713, (no date of 
publication, presumably the same year), and a further pamphlet 
in defence of The Plain Truth of 1708. Meanwhile in Bristol 
Bonny's newspaper had presumably come to an end. No copy can 
be traced later than May 31st, 1712. 1 And in 1713 Farley's 
Bristol Postman appeared. The earliest copy extant bears date 

1 William George, writing in The Athenceum for Aug. 2nd, 1884, says he 
has "seen a number" for that date. 



By Mrs. Herbert Richardson. 327 

July 25th, 1713, and is No. 24 1 ; this, if the numeration is reliable, 
gives February, 1713, as the date of the paper's inception. Assuming 
this to be correct, Farley must have left Exeter early in 1713, and 
devoted the first weeks of the year to launching his new enterprise* 
returning some time after April to his Exeter press, whence issued 
the sermon and pamphlet referred to above. 

It would be interesting to find that Farley took over Bonny's 
paper, and that his venture was thus directly connected with so 
early a provincial journal. We may assume that The Bristol Post 
Boy had hardly died (as Farley's Salisbury Post Man must have 
done) for lack of support. Bristol, at that date the second city of 
the kingdom, with its large and wealthy business population, could 
surely have maintained so useful an institution as a local newspaper 
for more than ten years. But whether Farley took over The Post 
Boy as a (: going concern " and improved upon it, or started his own 
journal independently of an already defunct predecessor, he was 
certainly influenced by the earlier paper. 

Bonny's Bristol Post Boy had been, like most early eighteenth 
century journals, 2 a weekly half-sheet in folio, 12| inches by 
7f inches, printed on both sides ' of an exceedingly coarse 
paper with no apparent water-mark. The four existing copies 
show its promoter to have possessed the true journalistic sense. 
All are dated Saturday to Saturday, except that for September 7th 
to 10th, 1709, which runs Wednesday to Saturday, For a time at 
least, therefore, Bonny must have issued twice weekly, and con- 
temporary history and the contents of this number suggest that 
he did so to meet the demand for news created by the Malplaquet 
campaign. Farley's later newspaper policy, in issuing three 
weekly copies of The Salisbury Post Man to deal with the progress 

1 Mr. Charles Wells, History of the Bristol Times and Mirror. The 
Athenceum refers to the same number as "in the possession of Mr. Leech, 
of The Bristol Times, c. 1853." 

2 The first English newspapers, issued by Dutch printers in Holland in 
1620, had been half-sheets in folio. From 1622 to 1665, however, all journals 
had been newsbooks, in pamphlet not leaf form. But with the advent of 
The London Gazette in 1665 the half -sheet in folio again appeared, and the 
newspaper was technically a " paper," though the newsbook form in some 
instances still survived. 



328 Wiltshire Newspapers— Past and Present. 

of the Eebellion of 'Fifteen, is a similar instance of what, at that 
date, one can justly describe as keen journalism. 

The Post Boys title, following closely the usual headings of 
London papers of the day, ran as follows: — 

The Bristol Post Boy, / Giving an Account of the most 
Material News both / Foreign and Domestick. / 
Farley changed the Post Boy to a Post Man, adapted the phrasing 
of its title,and gave the public twelve small quarto pages, 10 J inches 
by 7J inches, instead of one small folio sheet, at the low price of 
\\'i. He still kept to the weekly issue, and added to the attraction 
of his new publication by the use of ornamental cuts, one of which, 
a repeatedly-used initial S. with a ship in the lower corner, is from 
a good block and quite charming. The paper definitely conveys 
the impression of being a conscious improvement on its predecessor. 
It was printed on a good paper, with no apparent water-mark, 
slightly thicker and coarser than that of The Salisbury Post Man, 
and infinitely better than that of the earlier Post Boy, Its title 
is worth noting, as a comparison between the three early Farley 
papers presents many points of interest. 1 : — 

Sam Farley's Bristol / Post Man: / Or / Weekly Inteligence / 
from Holland, France, Spain, etc. / With General Occur- 
rences Foreign and Domestick. / Saturday, December the 
31st, 1715. (No. 25) / Note, This Paper will be constantly 
Published every Saturday / Morning, Two Hours after the 
London Post comes in ; carefully / Abstracted from the 
Gazette, Post-Man, Post-Boy, and Evening / Post, with 
Dormer's and other Written Letters ; free from all / Party 
cause, or Personal Eeflections / . (here follows his 

Printing Advertisement) . . • Printed at my House in 
St.Nicholas street, near the Church ; Deliver'd to any / publick 
or private House in this City for, Three Halfpence a Paper, 
and / seal'd and deliver'd for the Country at Two Pence, 
On either side of the title are the conventional cuts (which 

1 The title quoted is from the first of a fine run of seven copies in the 
Bristol Public Library (the majority in perfect condition). The evidence 
already given as to the paper's existence in 1713 shows how unreliable 
early newspaper numbering is. 



By Mrs, Herbert Richardson. 329 

Jos. Bliss had been original enough nofc to copy) of the mounted 
postman on the left and ship in full sail on the right. The postman 
faces to the right, and the ship sails on a rough sea; both cuts are 
of much poorer quality than the initial S already referred to. The 
paper is full of foreign news and of long reports of Scottish affairs. 
There is practically no local news (and only one local advertisement), 
nor of course anything in the nature of an editorial with reference 
to the Exeter or Salisbury ventures. 

Judging by the high standard of the existing copies, The Bristol 
Post Man must have been an unqualified success ; so much so, that 
Farley could safely leave it and return to his press at Exeter 
before the close of the year. Probably he left it in the hands of 
his sons Samuel and Felix, who we know were in partnership with 
him in 1718 1 and possibly earlier, and who presumably occupied 
the premises near the Church in St. Nicholas Street. The sermon 
and pamphlet referred to show Farley to have been back in Exeter 
in the latter part of 1713. And here, in 1714, he was again con- 
cerned in a newspaper enterprise, 

This was The Exeter Mercury? of which No. 1 appeared on 
September 24th, 1714. The Mercury was a weekly paper of six 
(occasionally eight) pages, two columns to the page, measuring 11J 
inches by 11 J inches — a generous measure of contents, it may be 
noted, on the lines of The Bristol Postman. It was well printed on 
a good thick paper (not unlike that of The Salisbury Post Man) 
with a small round water-mark whose symbols are indecipherable. 
Its title-page runs as follows : — 

Numb. 1. The Exeter Mercury / or / Weekly Intelligence / of 
News / Being a Faithful / Abstract of all the News Papers 
of Note / Containing the Material Occurrences / Foreign 
and Domestick / With a Particular Account of what Books / 
and Pamphlets are Published in Great / Britain, France, 
Holland, etc. / N.B. Advertisements are taken in at the 
usual Prices / Exon / Printed by Philip Bishop at his Printing 

1 Mr. Charles Wells — History of the Bristol Times and Mirror. 
2 There is an excellent run of The Exeter Mercury in the Library of the 
Devon and Exeter Institution. 
VOL. XL. — NO. CXXX. 2 B 



330 Wiltshire Newspapers — Past and Present. 

Office in St. Peter's Church /-yard, 1714. / To be continued 
Weekly Price Three Half Pence / Friday, September 24th, 
1714. / 
To either side of the title are the familiar wood cuts, on the left 
a ship in full sail and on the right a postman blowing his horn, 
both similar to The Salisbury Post Man cuts but nob identical, the 
Exeter postman in particular being from a better block, with horse 
and saddle-bag well marked. Above the name of the printer is 
an elaborate monogram of two P.B.s (one reversed) intertwined. 
Its contents, like those of The Bristol Post Man, comprise foreign 
and Scottish, but practically no local news, though there are more 
local advertisements than in the Bristol paper, and the weekly 
list of books and pamphlets, especially those locally printed, is very 
interesting. All the news is taken from the sources speeifiedjin 
the title-page of The Bristol Postman — The Gazette, Evening Post, 
Dormer's and other news letters, etc. 

Dr, Oliver (Farley's earliest biographer) definitely asserts that 
Farley started The Mercury and later passed it to Philip Bishop. 
The title-page quoted leads apparently to a contrary conclusion. 
But the following notice in the issue for Sepbember 30bh, 1715, 
definitely proves Farley to have been the printer: — 

" Exon Sept. 30. — This is to certify all my News-Customers that I am 

come to an agreement with Mr. Bishop (to save double Charges) That 

he should always print the News ; and you shall be as duly served 

with this as hitherto with mine; and abstracted from the same 

papers as mine ever was ; Not but that I continue on all other 

Business, and shall Print any Advertisements single. If this be 

acceptable, 'twill be very obliging to your Humble Servant, Sam. 

Farley." 

The confusion is not indeed so real as it- appears. Bishop was 

an Exeter bookseller for whom Farley constantly printed. Owing 

to the close connection between the two, Farley's press had probably 

been moved from the address in High St., " over against the New 

Inn," to premises adjoining or forming part of Philip Bishop's 

in Sb. Peter's Church-yard. Bishop was a purveyor both of 

pamphlets and newspapers, and by this time possessed, as one 

gathers from his advertisements, a considerable business in Exeter. 

Before the close of 1714 he must have decided to launch -out as a 



By Mrs. Herbert Richardson. 331 

printer 1 also, and either started a press of his own or taken over 
part of Farley's. It was in the dual capacity of printer and book- 
seller that Bishop continued The Exeter Mercury after Farley's 
departure for Salisbury, and the agreement quoted must have been 
influenced by the older printer's new plans. It is noteworthy that 
the success of The Mercury was by this time assured, as Bishop 
almost immediately on Farley's departure ventured on two weekly 
issues, the paper appearing after October 14th, 1715, on Tuesdays 
as well as Fridays. 

Farley embarked on his third venture in September or October, 
1715, taking his own press 2 with him to Salisbury as his ingenuous 
postscript 3 to the first number of The Salisbury Post Man (already 
quoted) proves, although it is just possible that he had already set 
up his first page in Exeter, with the idea of thus saving time and 
launching his paper immediately on his arrival. He certainly had 
great hopes of his new enterprise. His title-page asserts that the 
paper will be " made public in every Market Town Forty Miles 
distant from this City ; and several will be sent as far as Exeter," 
and he must obviously have reckoned on the support of his old 
" News-Customers " in Bristol and Exeter as well as on that of the 
Salisbury public. 

A close examination of The Salisbury Post Man shows its 
similarity with the two earlier Farley Papers. The stock phrase- 
ology," Material Occurrences, Foreign and Domestick," etc., is used 
in the title-page of each paper ; in each the wood-cuts of ship and 

1 Dr. Brushfield, guided by the Rev. Ingle Dredge's list, gives 1715 as the 
earliest date when Bishop's name appears as a printer. The Exeter Mercury, 
however, contains an advertisement for October 22nd, 1714, of a pamphlet 
E Printed by P. Bishop." 

2 The moving of a hand press in the early eighteenth century was no such 
difficult matter. Farley's old partner, Bliss, in a subsequent contest with 
Philip Bishop over "The Sale of News in the town of Taunton" gives 
notice that he will be " there with a Printing Press in order to serve the 
same town and print the same twice every week if encouraged." 

3 This naive apology for the dirty condition of the printer's type recalls 
the list of Errata at the end of Farley's Worthies of Devon, which begins 
with lengthy accuracy, but after proceeding some way ends abruptly thus : 
" With others too tedious to insert." The two postcripts surely throw a 
further ray of light on Farley's personality. 

2 B 2 



332 Wiltshire Newspapers — Past and Present. 

postman appear to right and left (in the case of The Exeter Mercury 
to left and right) of the title ; the cuts in all three papers are 
similar, though not identical, and the contents of two, The Salisbury 
Post Man and Bristol Post Man, are ornamented with additional 
cuts of some merit j 1 the paper on which The Salisbury Post Man 
is printed is, as in the case of the two other journals, of good 
quality (though, again, each paper varies in water-mark and width 
of the space between the lines made by the sewing wires) ; while 
in all three the news is gathered from the same sources,(2%e Evening 
Post, written news-letters, etc.), the price in each case is three-half- 
pence, and the contents (twelve pages quarto in The Bristol Post 
Man and six pages folio in The Exeter Mercury and Salisbury Post 
Man), a generous quota for the money. 

The Salisbury Post Man seems in fact to have been the ripe 
effort of Farley's newspaper experience, and the most ambitious 
of his early journalistic enterprises. Influenced probably by the 
success of The Exeter Mercury, which, as has been noted, had just 
transformed itself from a weekly into a twice- weekly, Farley bravely 
decreed for his new venture a thrice-weekly issue. If Bonny, of 
Bristol,could dare a twice-weekly issue for his Post Boy in 1709, to 
follow the Malplaquet campaign, Farley, printing six years later, 

1 It is curious to find that the cut which heads the news on the third 
page of The Salisbury Post Man, an oblong device (5| inches by 1 £ inch) 
of elaborate birds and scrolls, is absolutely identical with a cut which 
ornaments a later paper of Jos. Bliss's, The Protestant Mercury or Exeter 
Post Boy. Both blocks were presumably Exeter made. 

The Protestant Mercury is an interesting paper which Dr. Brusbfield 
regards as a later rival of The Exeter Mercury, and Mr. J. B. William* 
maintains (in Notes and Queries, Oct. 7th, 1916) is merely a continuation 
of Bliss's earlier Exeter Post Boy with a prefix added " to the original 
catch- word." The balance of evidence from The Protestant Mercury itself 
is in Dr. Brushfield's favour. It is an obvious imitation of Bishop's paper. 
Not only are the ship and post-boy cuts similar and similarly placed and 
entirely different from the royal portrait and city arms of Bliss's earlier. 
Post Boy, but the printer's name is surmounted by an unwarrantable 
imitation of Bishop's monogram, the intertwined P.B s varied only by the 
addition of two small birds. The arrangement of the heading and size of 
the word " News " further imitate the Mercury, and the defiant phrasing of 
the contents bill, "impartially collected from the Evening Post, etc." (the 
list is practically identical with that drawn on by Bishop) " so that no other 
can pretend to have a better collection," has the ring of the rival paper. 



By Mrs. Herbert Richardson. 333 

might well launch his thrice-weekly Post Man with sanguine hopes 
of success, for he had chosen a moment of yet more absorbing 
interest for its appearance. On September 14th (O.S. — Sept. 25th, 
N.S.) the Earl of Mar had raised the Jacobite standard at Braemar 
and the rebellion of the 'Fifteen had begun. Public excitement 
would surely afford full support to a paper dealing with the pro- 
gress of the rising. 

On Saturday, September 27th, accordingly, The Salisbury Post 
Man was to have appeared. The contents of the first number 
present, however, a strange discrepancy. They are compiled from 
the usual authorities — " So far The Evening Post" " All from the 
Written Letter/' etc. — but the date-headings of the paragraphs 
run " Edinburgh, Nov. 12th," " Paris, Nov. 23rd," " Hague, Nov. 
24th," " London, Nov. 24th," and so forth, and prove beyond 
doubt that the paper cannot possibly have appeared as dated on its 
title-page. The news itself explains this remarkable disagreement 
in dates: it contains an account of " My Lord Duke of Argyle's " 
engagement with the " Kebels " on Nov. 13th and 14th, in which 
" for some time our dragoons gave no quarter," a report from 
London that "the two great Actions with the Kebels in Lancashire 
and Scotland are still the subject of all Conversations," and a " List 
of the Prisoners taken at Stirling',' One is forced to the conclusion 
that Farley had intended bringing out his paper on September 
27th, and even set up his first sheet in type for that purpose, but 
that the slow march of events had stayed bis hand. Day after 
day be must have waited for news of a decisive engagement with 
the Jacobite rebels, biding his time deliberately through the tense 
excitement of October and November, until the battles of Sheriff- 
muir and Preston were fought at last, and he could bring out his 
first number with news for which a nation was waiting. 1 It was, 
in fact, a record first number at which Farley was aiming, and his 
policy is yet another proof of the importance he attached to his 

1 The duplicate first number of The Post Man confirms the discrepancy 
in dates, which is not due, as might be surmised, to a later number being 
folded in with an earlier title. A comparison with other early provincial 
newspapers reveals, moreover, no single number dated so diversely in its 
cover and contents. The explanation can only be that given. 



334 Wiltshire Newspapers — Past and Present. 

latest paper, while it is quite in keeping with the true journalistic 
flair his work as a whole reveals. As The Post Man's final 
paragraph of news is headed " London, Nov. 24th," the first number 
must have appeared on Saturday, Nov. 25th, when the third post 
for the week had duly arrived. 

The identification of the premises on which Farley's Salisbury 
Post Man was first printed is a question of much interest. The 
<( Office adjoyning to Mr. Robert Silcocks, on the Ditch in Sarum " 
was in all probability situated in the tenement at the*extreme 
end of the alley that runs between the present premises of The 
Salisbury and Winchester Journal and those of Messrs. Brown & Co., 
on the Canal. This tenement is now roughly divided, part being 
in the occupation of Messrs. Bennett Bros, and part in that of 
Messrs. Brown & Co. But it is obvious that both portions origin- 
ally formed one house, and about this the earliest traditions of 
Salisbury printing still cling. 

Evidence for the assumption that Farley's press of 1715: — 16 
was here set up is derived from a study of the Salisbury Corporation 
rate-books and from the premises themselves. The rate-books of 
1715 show Mr, Robert Silcocks' house, 1 which was in the Dolphin 
Chequer 2 of the New St. Ward, to have been highly assessed both for 
land and window tax. Earlier rate-books prove it also to have been 
in the owner's occupation from about 1704. It was therefore a 
large and well-known house, quite suited for "address" purposes 
as given in The Post Man. "Adjoyning" it on the one side in 
1715 were one lowly rated and two moderately rated tenements 
before a larger house is recorded, and on the other a large house of 
similar size, two small tenements very lowly rated, and then another 
large house occupied by Mr. Hillman. The Hillman house we can 
identify later, and this, with the tenements between it and the 



1 Farley's name does not of course appear in the rate-books. He was 
presumably tenant only of a portion of the premises, and that for no lengthy 
period. 

2 The Dolphin Inn was " In Katherine St., and the lower end of New St.," 
so that the Dolphin chequer must have included the modern Canal. 



By Mrs. Herbert Richardson. 335 

Sillcocks house, we may follow in the rate-books, 1 dismissing the 
houses on the further side of the Silcocks house, which would give 
us a location round the corner in Catherine Street instead of "on 
the Ditch." In 1748, therefore, we find the house of Messrs. 
Hillman and Tatum as the house occupied by Mr. Hillman in 
1715, and that of Mr. Snow as the earlier Silcocks house. One 
large house and one lowly rated tenement are still between them as 
between the Silcocks and Hillman houses of 1715, and one other 
small tenement " adjoyning." Now the Hillman and Tatum house 
of 1748 is the building at present occupied by Messrs. Brown and 
Mr. Eambridge. It was then tenanted by "Messieurs Tatum and 
Still, Apothecaries," and into it in this year Benjamin Collins, pro- 
prietor of The Salisbury Journal, moved his printing and bookselling 
business from Silver Street. If we assume that the Snow house of 
1745 (the Silcocks house of 1715) was on the site now occupied by 
the present Journal Office, or part of Messrs. Bloom's, we narrow 
down the area in which the Farley Office may be traced to that part 
of the Canal which lies between the present premises of Messrs. 
Brown and Messrs. Bloom. We may then conclude that one of the 
small tenements between these larger premises — and therefore, pre- 
sumably, down the alley — was that in which Farley first set up 
his press ; and the old building at the extreme end certainly seems 
the most likely location. Its character and traditions strengthen 
the assumption. In one of its rooms (now forming part of the 
present Journal premises and used for storing paper), a room with 
a strong floor which would well have carried a hand printing-press, 
an old wood-block for a broadsheet, 2 of very rough and early type, 
has been found, with other wood-block de'bris, in one corner of the 
floor. In the gabled rooms above which are entered from Messrs. 
Brown's premises, though really forming part of the same building, 
and are again strongly floored and supported by heavy beams, The 
Salisbury Journal of 1748 and onwards was indubitably set up and 

1 The sequence is not entirely easy, as the collector obviously called 
sometimes in different order at the houses when making his estimate for 
taxes. 

2 Publiua Zentulus, his letter to the Senate of Borne concerning Jesus 
Christ. The block was found in two pieces, and has since been mended. 



336 Wiltshire Newspapers — Past and Present 

printed — the old criminal broadsheets and notices pasted up by the 
printers still remain upon the doors. 

There seems no doubt that this quaint, and now unfortunately 
dilapidated, old tenement, covered on its further side with pictu- 
resque overlapping red tiles, was the first home of Salisbury printing. 
It is thus a rather remarkable fact that the present Salisbury and 
Winchester Journal is printed on premises of which the house 
whence Farley originally issued his Post Man of 1715 — 16 still 
forms part. 

It is disappointing to find that The Salisbury Post Man, to which 
its promoter himself attached so much importance and which had 
made so dramatic an entry into the newspaper world, cannot have 
been an unqualified success. After March 1st, 1716, we lose all 
trace of the paper. The issue for that date (mentioned by Hatcher) 
is " No. 40," and proves that the thrice-weekly issue cannot have 
been regularly adhered to. The quick suppression of the Eebellion 
of 'Fifteen would in some measure account for this, but The Post 
Man seems indeed to have been too ambitious in scheme. At a 
time when, even in London, many important papers still kept to 
the twice or thrice-weekly issue, 1 a newspaper aiming at an ap- 
pearance three times a week in a town which was neither extensive 
in population 2 nor an important trading centre can hardly have 
found a ready sale. The position of Salisbury on the great western 
road, with coaches running daily through it from London to Bath, 
Exeter, Southampton, and elsewhere, may also have adversely 
affected the success of its first newspaper; for the many coaching 
inns in the city must all have been well provided with the London 
journals, and the citizen would still consult these in the coffee 

1 London had, however, possessed a daily paper, The Daily Courant, since 
1702, and an evening paper, The Evening Post, with the Historical Account , 
since 1706. 

2 An interesting manuscript list (in the Blackmore Museum, at Salisbury) 
of the number of houses in the city in the year 1753 gives 8760 as the popu- 
lation at that date, an estimate arrived at by assuming 6 persons in each 
house, and multiplying the number of houses, 1460, by this figure. A census 
of 1775, however, gives 6856 only (see Hatcher, and Easton's Salisbury 
Guide). 



By Mrs, Herbert Richardson. 337 

I rooms of the Angel, the Antelope, the White Hart, or the Black 
Horse. 

Judging by the absence of all later traces of the paper, it is 
most probable that before the end of 1716 Samuel Farley definitely 
abandoned the enterprise of The Salisbury Post Man and decided 
— his Exeter Mercury being also now in other hands — to devote his 
future energies to the development of his earliest newspaper ven- 
ture, The Bristol Post Man. It was in Bristol certainly that he 
permanently settled as a printer, working after 1718 in partnership 
with his sons Samuel and Felix. 

His connection with Exeter was almost severed. The Rev. Ingle 
Dredge's list shows no book or pamphlet printed in Exeter by 
Samuel Farley after 1715, and it is not until May, 1723, that he 
seems for a time to, have been back in the city, where there was 
indeed little further scope for his energies. The great Exeter 
printer, Andrew Brice — producer at that date of The Postmaster, 
and later of the important and long-lived Brice 's Weekly Journal 
—was now in the local newspaper field, in addition to George 
Bishop, Philip Bishop's son, and Philip's old rival, Jos. Bliss. It 
ia perhaps characteristic of Farley's journalistic daring that he 
should, after so long an interval, have attempted once again to 
capture the Exeter newspaper public. In May, 1723, he com- 
menced another local paper, Farley's Exeter Journal x — " Exon : 
Printed by S. Farley, over against the Guild Hall" — a not entirely 
typical Farley production, remarkable, when compared with his 
earlier journals, for its absence of any wood-cut ornamentation. It 
is very probable, however, that Farley's son Edward had really 
more to do with the paper than his father; and some time in the 

1 latter half of 1725 2 Samuel definitely transferred his Exeter Journal 
to Edward Farley and finally severed his connection with Exeter, 

: 

1 An existing copy — No. 104, for Friday, May 14th, 1725 — gives, as far as 
the counting-back system may be relied on, May, 1723, as the date of the 
paper's inception. 

2 Dr. Brushfield says " between June 4th, 1725, and May 20th, 1726" ; but 
i a copy in the Burney Collection (British Museum) for Jan. 6th, 1726, is 
' "printed bv E. Farley," showing the transfer to have been earlier. 

f 



338 Wiltshire Newspapers — Past and Present 

as in 1716 he bad done with Salisbury. 1 Henceforward bis interests 
and printing activities lay exclusively in Bristol, the city with 
which his family was originally connected, and which had since 
1713 so well supported his earliest and most successful newspaper. 

The Bristol Post Man seems to have steadily endured during 
these years. But in 1725 an important Government measure 
affected the newspaper world. Hitherto newspapers had been 
reckoned, for stamp duty purposes, as pamphlets, and taxed at 3s. 
the impression. Now, however, the duty was imposed at the rate 
of a penny the whole and a half-penny the half-sheet, and news- 
paper printers thus had new conditions of issue to deal with. It 
was this change which probably led Farley to abandon The Exeter 
Journal, leaving Edward to deal in Exeter with the new situation, 
and to concentrate his energies on his more important Bristol 
venture. He at once changed the three-halfpenny Post Man, 
" seal'd and deliver'd for the Country at Two Pence," into Farley's 
Bristol Newspaper, a typical Farley journal, four pages, 10 J inches by 
8 J, for two pence, " Containing the most Genuine occurrences 
Foreign and Domestick " (the old phrasing), and ornamented with 
a wood-cut view of the city of churches. It was printed "at my 
house below the Dolphin in Wine Street," or "at my house near 
Newgate in Wine St.," and has, with various changes of title and 
absorption of other journals, survived until to-day as The Bristol 
Times and Mirror. 2 

The later career of Samuel Farley and the fortunes of his news- 
papers concern the student of Bristol rather rather than of 
Salisbury local history, just as the subsequent printing activities 
of other members of the family connect themselves with that of 
Exeter and Bath. 3 The exact relationship of the many later 

1 It is, however, surprising to find an Edmund Farley in the Salisbury 
rate-books, holding a very small tenement on the Canal from 1736 to about 
1745. But his business or connection with the Farley family are not 
traceable. 

2 See Mr. Charles Wells's History of the Bristol Times and Mirror. 

3 Dr. Brushfield gives a few interesting details about Edward and Mark 
Farley, both of whom seem to have got into political trouble at Exeter 
owing to their Jacobite principles. He and the Exon Biography of 1849 
also refer to Felix of Bristol, but their references are vague and inaccurate. 



By Mrs. Herbert Richardson. 339 

Farleys to each other and to Samuel himself is a question still of 
some obscurity. 

Samuel died somewhere about the year 1732. 1 His career up 
to 1725 has been followed here in detail from the special point of 
view of his position as pioneer printer in the history of the Wiltshire 
newspaper. But it is not perhaps too much to say that West of 
England journalism still owes much to his vigour and enterprise, 
and that his very real importance in the larger history of the 
English provincial press deserves fuller recognition than it has yet 
received. 



THE DETECTOR (1786—7). 

The Detector is a rare little publication of which only three copies 2 
• — the Consecutive issues Nos. I., II., and III, — apparently exist. 
In size it approximates rather to the contemporary magazine (The 
Gentleman s Magazine, London Magazine, and so forth) than the 
newspaper, as it, is a small octavo publication measuring 8f inches 
by 6J, and containing sixteen pages. It has not, however, the 
rough blue-grey cover of the eighteenth century magazine; both 
cover and contents are printed on the same hand-made paper of 
fair quality, water-marked with a large fieur-de-lys and some un- 
decipherable letters. Its title-page runs as follows; — 

Green's Bibliography of Somerset mentions a topical poem printed at Bath 
by Felix Farley, *' at Shakespeare's Head without West Gate," in 1733 ; and 
the Victoria County History of Somerset adds that in 1741 " S. and E. 
Farley had succeeded to the business." A copy of Farley's Bath Journal 
for October 18th, 1756 (Vol. I.), no number given, is in the British Museum, 
bound up with the Bath Advertiser for 1755—6 ; it is endorsed " Bath : 
Printed by Samuel Farley, in the Market-Place," and refers advertisers also 
to " the Printing Office in Small Street," Bristol. There are no copies of 
Bath-printed Farley papers in either the Reference Library or the Royal 
Literary Institution at Bath. 

1 The exact date is not established. The Manual of Gloucestershire 
Literature includes him among the Bristol printers until 1732, after which 
date his sons Samuel and Felix seem to have succeeded him. 

2 In the possession of the Earl of Radnor. 



340 Wiltshire Newspapers — Past and Present. 

The / Detector : No. 1 / l An Occasional Paper ; / Calculated 

for, the Meridian 2 of Sarum. / Printed for the Author. 3 / 

On its third page — the reverse of the title is blank — the Detector's 

policy is set forth in the following address "To the Reader": — 

'* Like most candidates for public approbation, I shall not set out with 
professions of candour and impartiality ; for these are in general but 
foolish protestations, without any definite meaning ; I desire to be 
judg'd by my motive of — ' Holding the Mirror up to Nature,' and 
shewing Vice its own Deformity — In the execution I shall not be 
deterred by any combination, however powerful or formidable ; and I 
hope to be favoured with the assistance of the Ingenious and Well- 
inclined. All communications, post-paid, addressed to X.X., at Peele's 
Coffee-House, 4 Fleet Street, in London, will be handed to The Editor." 

The second number also states that The Detector will be " Pub- 
lished by Subscription, on tire first Monday in every Month for 
Twelve Months certain," and "Subscriptions, at shillings 

for the year, taken in at in Salisbury " (the 

blanks are not filled in). 

The Detector s contents show that its ostensible object of "Holding 
the Mirror up to Nature" is an egregious under-statement. It is 
in fact an anonymously written and anonymously printed 5 publi- 
cation of peculiarly scurrilous and vindictive character, attacking 
nearly every person of note in contemporary Salisbury. 

Its plan is quite a well-ordered one. It applies to civic politics 
and to the notable persons of a provincial town the methods which 
"Junius" and John Wilkes and William Bingley had employed 

1 " No. 1 " in script. 

2 The quaint phrase " calculated for the Meridian of Sarum " (Meridian, 
the particular place or state of anything— Dr. Johnson), is frequent in 
eighteenth century journalism. It is used for a title, as here, and in the 
correspondence columns, where communications are rejected as "ill calcu- 
lated for the meridian of a newspaper." 

3 " Author," until quite late in the eighteenth century, is used far more 
frequently than the modern " Editor." 

4 Peele's was one of the many London CoffeeHouses at which agents 
took in advertisements and " articles of intelligence " for The Salisbury and 
Winchester Journal. 

5 There is no clue to the printer. It may have been printed in Fleet 
Street — there were plenty of presses near Peele's CofFee-House. Or it may 
have been printed in Salisbury, possibly by J. Hodson, near the Poultry 
Cross, printer of a theatrical pamphlet referred to later. 



By Mrs. Herbert Richardson. 341 

against the Bute and Grafton Ministries and the younger princes 
of the house of Brunswick. It is a poor travesty of The Letters of 
Junius and The North Briton, with Mr. William Hussey, the City 
Member, as Grafton, and Benjamin Charles Collins, proprietor of 
The Salisbury and Winchester Journal, as the Duke of Cumberland 
and spite and meanness and untruthfulness supply in it the place 
of the splendid indignation and literary vigour of its great originals. 

Each number begins with what we should now call an " open 
letter," to the " Printer " of Salisbury, the Mayor or the Corporation. 
An account of New Sarum, of " Colossus," its member, or an attack 
on the "Usurer" follows; and each number ends with a section 
entitled "Miscellaneous," wherein practically every one of note in 
the city, not already mentioned, is impartially abused. The persons 
so grossly libelled are designated by cognomens, or (in the usual 
eighteenth century style) by the first and last letters of their 
names only. But we may, with reference to Hatcher's History of 
Salisbury and the files of The Salisbury and Winchester Journal for 
1788 — 7, easily elucidate the Detector s vague and invariably 
offensive allusions. 

" Colossus " is Alderman William Hussey, city member from 
1774 to 1813. 1 The " Usurer " is Benjamin Collins, banker, pur- 
veyor of patent medicines and perfumery and proprietor of The 
Salisbury and Winchester Journal, who died in 1785 ; the " Printer 
of S . . . y," is his son, Benjamin Charles Collins. The " no 
longer worshipful" Mayor is Alderman George Maton, previously 
Chamberlain of Salisbury, a city wine merchant. The " Despotic 
Leader of the Corporation " is Jacob, 2nd Earl of Radnor, Recorder 
of the city. The Post-Master is Charles Mayo Keele, who succeeded 
his father, Daniel Keele, in that capacity in August, 1786. " Long- 
ears " is Alderman Thomas Long, a cabinet-maker, Chamberlain 
of the city during Maton's year of office. The Deputy-Recorder, 
Sir Alexander Powell. The clergyman " not likely to give alms to* 
the poor," is the Rev Edmund Benson of the Close. And the 
"itinerant vagabonds C— ns and D . . . s" are Messrs, 

1 He was fellow-member with the Hon. W. H. Bouverie, who sat from 
1776 to 1802. 



342 Wiltshire Newspapers — Past and Present. 

Collins and Davies, managers of the Salisbury Theatre. 1 These 
are the most notable persons attacked — the two first with peculiar 
venom, and after them, perhaps, the theatre managers — but many 
other citizens of the day share in the little magazine's wholesale 
abuse. 

The cognomens quoted give a general idea of The Detector's style, 

which may be further illustrated by one typical specimen, its 

preposterously unjust description of Benjamin Collins, a man 

nearly;two years in his grave at the time of the paper's appearance: — 

" I knew the man well. — Sprung from the dregs of the people he was 

turned loose upon the world to shift for himself as soon as he could 

crawl. — His looks were shrewd, sly, methodical, and plodding. Practice 

had fixed upon his passive face the hollow varnish of a servile smile, 

which covered a depth of design and a latitude of principle equal to 

any attempt. — Early initiated in every species of low fraud and chicane, 

these invariably governed the conduct of his life. — It would exhaust 

language, perhaps, to do justice to so complicated a character ! — a 

character in which extortion oppression and hypocrisy were wonderfuly 

blended and displayed." 

The questions of date and probable authorship of this scurrilous 
publication may be briefly considered. The general references to 
people of note in local history — to the mayoralty of Alderman 
Maton, the doings of the theatre managers, 2 and so forth — clearly 
assign The Detector to the winter of 1786 — 7 ; while the only 
definite date in the three existing numbers gives a clue to the 
months of publication. This is "Jan. 1st, 1787," which appears at 
the foot of an " open letter " in No. IT. Now the " first Monday " 
in January, 1787, was Jan, 1st, but the second number of a new 
magazine would quite probably appear a few days late, so that we 
may fairly assume No. II. to have been the issue for January, 1787, 
and thus arrive at December, 1786, to February, 1787, as the 
probable dates of the magazine's appearance. 

The date of publication throws also an interesting side-light on 
the " Author's " choice of title. The pseudonym Detector was not 
an unusual one in eighteenth century politics, but it became of 

1 And also of those at Southampton and Winchester. See the Theatric 
Tourist, 1805. 

2 The Salisbury Theatre's season was a winter one, extending from late 
October to early April. 



By Mrs. Herbert Richardson. 343 

note as a frequent signature to letters and pamphlets in the long 
controversy which raged over the actions of Warren Hastings as 
Governor General of Bengal. In 1786 Burke had moved the im- 
peachment of Hastings, and the impending trial was a matter of 
tremendous public interest. The anonymous Detector of Salisbury 
showed some skill in choosing for his title a pseudonym which 
possessed at that date a certain topical familiarity. 

It is not possible to pierce the Detectors anonymity. No writer's 
name appears in the existing numbers, except that of " F. Gerard," 
who signs a letter in No. I. But F. Gerard was certainly not the 
"Author," as "Mr. Gerard's letter" is referred to in No. III. by 
the Detector himself. And the name Gerard is not familiar in local 
history. The files of The Salisbury and Winchester Journal for 
1786 — 7 do not once mention it in any connection, civic, business, 
or social. Nor does it appear in the earliest Directories 1 which 
give the names of the Salisbury citizens. It is indeed highly 
probable that " F. Gerard " did not exist, and that the whole paper, 
judging by its style, was the work of one man. We may get no 
nearer that one man's identity than the assumption that he was a 
personal enemy of Mr. Hussey, of B. 0. Collins, or of Collins and 
Davies, the theatre managers, all of whom are attacked with 
peculiar vindictiveness. 

The Detector s enmity seems to have been stung to this active 
manifestation by the unpopular Act of 1785, 2 which, while allowing 
for the demolition of the old Council House and the erection of a 
new one, in accordance with the generous proposals of the City 
Recorder, the Earl of Radnor, also provided for the imposition of 
certain tolls per head on cattle offered for sale in the city markets 
and fairs. These tolls were greatly resented both by the majority 
of the citizens and by the graziers attending the markets. And 
it is certainly clear from the magazine's contents that if its 
"Author" had any grievance additional to the mere existence of 

1 Bailey's British Directory of 1784 and the Merchants' and Traders' 
Useful Companion of 1790 and 1793. (In the British Museum.) 

2 See Hatcher's History of Salisbury^ Chap XLIV., and The Salisbury 
and Winchester Journal, passim. 



344 Wiltshire Newspapers — Past and Present. 

Salisbury and its citizens, be found it in tbis obnoxious Act. 1 It 
is tbus just possible, tliougb bardly likely, that the writer was a 
city tradesman or local grazier, injured in his pocket by the existing 
system of tolls and the consequent abstention of the cattle-dealers 
from the Salisbury markets. 

If we look, on the other hand, for a clue to authorship in the 
files of The Salisbury and Winchester Journal, on the assumption 
that B. 0. Collins must have noticed in his paper the attacks upon 
himself and his family of so vindictive an enemy, we are struck 
by the absence of any reference, direct or indirect, to The Detector. 
Neither the advertisement columns, correspondence, nor city news 
refer to it in any way. The Salisbury and Winchester Journal of 
that date was, however, a widely-circulated newspaper of real 
weight and dignity, and its complete ignoring of so scurrilous a 
publication was quite in keeping with its general policy. 

The Detector s obvious hostility to the theatre managers suggests 
another line of investigation. It is interesting in this connection 
to find confirmation of an existing ill-feeling towards Messrs. 
Collins and Davies in a pamphlet 2 of an earlier date, The Contrast 
or New Mode of Management. Being a Peep behind the Curtain of 
the Salisbury Theatre in 1776. Wherein the requisites to form a 
Brace of Managers . . . are all nicely weigh'd, duly considered 
and justly displayed . . . by T. BrownsmMh, Late Nominal 
Prompter to the said Theatre. " Brownsmith," a rather patent 
pseudonym, divides between his subjects "pride, impertinence, 
absence of mind, sullen disposition, ignorance, meanness of spirit 
and ingratitude," and attacks their methods as managers in very 

scathing terms, In The Detector, with his " vagabonds C ns 

a ,,d D s," we may therefore possibly see "Brownsmith" again 

attacking his old enemies. 3 

1 The section of the Act affecting the tolls was suspended in May, 1787. 

2 In the British Museum. It was printed " by J. Hodson, near the Poultry 
Cross." 

3 The Salisbury Theatre and its players seem, in the latter half of the 
eighteenth century to have been noted beyond the limits of the city. 
There is another pamphlet in the British Museum, printed in London, 
slightly earlier than The Contrast — Candour, an Enquiry into the real 
Merits of the Salisbury C omedians— which describes the attainments of the 
various actors and actresses in kindly appreciative humorous verse. 



By Mrs. Herbert Richardson. 345 

Bub in the absence of any clear evidence as to authorship, the 
theory that the writer was a personal enemy of William Hussey's, 
actuated by mean jealousy of the City Member's outstanding merit 
and deservedly popular position in New Sarum, is the most tenable. 
Hussey, as one of the city's representatives, had been most active 
in presenting to Parliament the Petition which resulted in the 
passing of the offending Act for the erection of a new Council- 
House and the accompanying imposition of market tolls, and he 
is the person most bitterly and repeatedly attacked in The Detector's 
three existing numbers. He was moreover a man of vigorous and 
decisive character, uncompromisingly downright in his methods — 
the type of man who does make enemies among those smaller- 
minded than himself. But there is nothing in accessible records, 
or in the traditions of the Hussey family, to show the name of his 
detractor. Considering the general tone and policy of The Detector, 
the preservation of the anonymity of its author is not, however, 
greatly to be deplored. 

The three Detectors here considered seem to be all that have 
survived. It is highly probable that the little magazine died an 
early death as a result of its own venomous character, and that 
the Salisbury citizens of 1787 had sufficient generosity and good 
sense to refuse to encourage the appearance for " Twelve Months 
certain" of so scurrilous and vindictive a publication. 

THE COUNTY MAGAZINE (1786—92). 

The County Magazine, or as it was later called, The Western 
County Magazine, is an interesting monthly miscellany, now com- 
paratively rare, 1 which was published by Benjamin Charles Collins, 
proprietor of The Salisbury and Winchester Journal. It appeared at 
a time when the magazine of miscellaneous interest — archaeological, 
historic, anecdotal, and poetic — was enormously popular. The 
Gentleman's Magazine had been the pioneer of such publications, 
but in 1786, when The County Magazine first appeared, there were 
numerous similar magazines in existence — The London Magazine, 

1 There is a complete set in the British Museum. 
VOL. XL. — NO. CXXX. 2 C 



346 Wiltshire Newspapers — Past and Present. 

Town and Country Magazine, European Magazine, Literary Magazine, 
Critical Beview, Lady's Magazine, Fashionable Magazine, Carlton 
House Magazine, and many others 1 — and on the general lines of 
these The County Magazine was modelled. 

In size The County Magazine was for the first three years of its 
duration, from 1786 to 1788, somewhat unusual, being a quarto 
publication measuring lOf inches by 8J, and containing sixteen 
pages. With its issue for January, 1789, however, it reduced itself 
to the conventional size of the late eighteenth century magazine, an 
octavo of 8J inches by 6J, containing thirty-two pages — "an 
Alteration requested very generally by many respectable corres- 
pondents and subscribers." This change seems to have increased 
its circulation, as the Prefaces to the smaller volumes repeatedly 
refer to " a still further Increase of Sale." The fact that the 
magazine was after 1789 jointly issued by a London printer points 
also in the same direction. 

It was printed on a white hand-made paper of good quality, 
with no water-mark visible other than the lines made by the sewing 
wires. Its covers were of the usual stout grey-blue paper that 
wrapped the eighteenth century magazine, 2 with advertisements of 
books, almanacks, patent medicines or perfumery on the last leaf. 

It is not possible to quote the title page of the first number, 
surviving copies being naturally in bound-volume form, but this 
may be taken from a preliminary advertisement in The Salisbury 
and Winchester Journal for February 13th, 1786: — 

A Companion for the Fireside. / In a few days will be Published 
/ Price Three-pence / and sold by B. C. Collins, on the Canal, 
Salis/bury; the Correspondents as per the last page; /and the 
Newsmen ;/No. l(to be continued Monthly) of/ The County Magazine, 
for January, 1786. / Respectfully dedicated to the Inhabitants of 
the / Counties of / Wilts, Hants, Dorset, Somerset, and Berks./ 

The title-page for 1788 3 is practically similar: — 

1 Some of these are also rare. Their advertisements may be found in 
contemporary London newspapers, but actual volumes are scarce. 

2 In one of the volumes possessed by the writer, that for 1788, the original 
covers are bound in together at the end. 

3 From the volume with original covers, previously referred to. 



By Mrs. Herbert Richardson. 347 

The County Magazine /For January, 1788, / Particularly dedicated 
to the Inhabitants of / Berkshire, Dorsetshire, Hampshire, 
Somersetshire / and Wiltshire /. etc. 

But from 1789 until its death in 1792 the magazine appears 
under a longer and more varied title, which very clearly sets forth 
its general plan and policy : — 

The Western / County Magazine, / For the Year 1789 ; / Par- 
ticularly dedicated to the Inhabitants of / Wilts, Hants, Berks, 
Dorset, Somerset, Devon / and Cornwall ; / Containing a copious 
Selection of whatever is valuable in / Literature, Politics, and 
History, / and the greatest Variety of / Original and Selected Pieces 
in Prose and Verse. / Under the several Descriptions of / Antiquities 
and Anecdotes / Biographical Sketches / Chronology and Criticism 
/ Dramatic Effusions / Essays, serious, comic, civil and political / 
Flights of Fancy and curious Facts / Geography / General History/ 
Hunting Songs / Jeu d'Esprits and Inuendos / Kings and Princes / 
Law Reports / Music and Morals / Natural History / Odes and 
Sonnets / Poetry and Poor Laws / Questions in Arts and Sciences / 
Rational Amusements / Songs, humorous and comic / Travels 
foreign and domestic / Verses and Lines upon various Subjects / 
with a Choice Selection of Miscellaneous Articles / On the most 
common Occurrences. / By a Society of Gentlemen. / Volume III. 
/ Eye Nature's Walk, Shoot Folly as it flies, / And catch the living 
Manners as they rise. / Pope. / Salisbury : / Printed for and sold 
by B. C. Collins, and by S. Crowder, in London. / 

This comprehensive ".Selection," gives a good idea of The County 
Magazine's general contents. But a " Card " in The Salisbury and 
Winchester Journal for August 14th, 1786, further shows that it 
had a distinct bias in favour of contributions of local and archae- 
ological interest, as it specially invited " Communications of the 
learned and ingenious — particularly in 

1. Provincial Biography of celebrated and distinguished 

characters, born in either county or the West of England. 

2. ProvincialTopography,AntiquitiesCuriosities, and Natural 

History. 

3. Provincial Art, Manufactures, and Agriculture. 

2 c 2 



348 Wiltshire Newspapers— Past and Present, 

4. Provincial Occurrences of the last Month. 

5. Provincial Events from the earliest time, 

6. A Table of Meteorology for the last preceding month, 

with such observations as may have occurred." 
This specialisation in "provincial" articles makes up a fair 
portion of the magazine's contents and gives it peculiar interest. 
It published, for example, from one correspondent, a chronological 
list of occurrences in Salisbury, from the year 1737 onwards. From 
others, accounts of the Wiltshire Moon-rakers, appreciations of 
Old Sarum and Netheravon, lives of Dean Younger, BishopDouglas, 
Thomas Chubb 1 of East Harnham, and so forth. Among its 
"weather" articles are some interesting letters describing re- 
markable thunderstorms in Wiltshire and similar phenomena. Its 
"natural history" contributions include some excellent articles on 
English birds. A long and acrimonious controversy over "a Plan 
for preserving Turnips," in which many Wiltshire fanners take 
part, finds place in its correspondence section. And the somewhat 
frivolous "Enigmatical lists" of ladies and gentlemen at Salisbury, 
Portsmouth, Southampton, Marlborough, Frome, Westbury, etc., 
which appear nearly every month, are ingenious and amusing. 

The remaining contents were, as the title-page of 1789—92 sets 
forth, of the most varied character, only second in interest to the 
provincial and antiquarian contributions. Each number usually 
begins/on the conventional lines of the eighteenth century magazine, 
with a series of anecdotes, and ends, again conventionally, with 
"Poetry," which ranges from indifferent verse and Vauxhall songs 
to well-chosen extracts from Gray and Cowper. There are in ad- 
dition the usual accounts of matters of real public importance, such' 
as the trial of Warren Hastings ; or of general contemporary in- 
terest, such as the cutting of the Pitt diamond and the mutiny of 
the sailors of the Bounty; law reports; accounts of recent plays 
and pantomimes; and the "state of the weather" (generally con- 
tributed by the Kev. T, Mai ham, of Plymouth), which forms a 
complete forecast for the coming month. From time to time an 



The deistical writer. 



By Mrs, Herbert Richardson. 349 

interesting Catalogue 1 of " New and Secondhand Books " obtainable 
at B, C, Collins's shop in Salisbury is also added. And four 
illustrations appear. These are two pleasant quarto engravings 
by J. A. Gesse, one from the relievo of Quintus Curtins leaping 
into the gulf, and the other from the statue of Cupid breaking his 
bow — both in the Earl of Pembroke's collection at Wilton House; 
and, in the octavo volumes, a poor picture of " the late Sir Charles 
Asgill's house at Kicbmond," ^and an excellent little medallion 
portrait of the Duke of Bedford, by T. Prattent, "from an original 
model." 

There is certainly no doubt that the subscribers to The County 
Magazine received generous measure for their monthly three-pence. 
One cannot trace any notable original contributors. The writers 
generally sign with an initial or a pseudonym, and are content to 
be included among the " Society of Gentlemen " to whom, in 
accordance with contemporary convention, the authorship was 
attributed. The actual editor was undoubtedly B. C. Collins 
himself. 

After a successful career of seven years, however, The Western 
County Magazine came to a dignified end in 1792. The address to 
" our Subscribers " at the end of the issue for December, 1792, states 
that, " from the Necessity of directing our Labour speedily to some 
important Objects of a different Nature, we close the present 
Work." And the valedictory Preface to the last volume is to the 
same effect : — 

"We find ourselves under the Necessity of attending to En- 
gagements of a more important Nature, and therefore close our 
Literary Career under the present form of a general Kepository." 

B. C. Collins was in fact no longer able to devote the necessary 
time and energy to a compilation of this nature. His business, 
both as banker and purveyor of patent medicines and perfumery, 2 
was greatly increasing. The turnover from the latter was at this 

1 Priees are given. In 1787, for example, one could still buy the first 
I edition of The Vicar of Wakefield for 3s. 

2 The latter business was almost invariably combined with printing and 
bookselling in the eighteenth century. 



350 Wiltshire Newspapers — Past and Present. 

date very large, and he was also now contemplating the opening 
of a London office in connection with his Salisbury Bank. 

The political situation was, moreover, one which at this time 
made great demands upon the press, and Collins's position as pro- 
prietor of The Salisbury and Winchester Journal must have been 
in itself sufficiently arduous and exacting. Abroad, the progress 
of the Kevolution in France was of absorbing interest, especially 
after January and February, 1793, 1 when the Kepublic formally 
declared war on England, having first " thrown down as its gage 
of battle the head of a king." At home, Kevolution principles 
were speading dangerously, and Associations for the "Defence of 
the government and the constitution," for the "Protection of 
property" and so forth, were constantly being formed, all de- 
manding full publicity and the printing of long lists of signatories 
in the local paper. 

The continuation of leisurely literary work was at this date an 
absolute impossibility for a man of so many activities. And it is 
characteristic of B. C, Collins's sound business and journalistic 
sense that he brought his literary venture to an end while it was 
still a popular and widely-circulated publication, and did not wait 
for public interest in it to wane with the development of the 
tremendous war on which the country was just entering. 

The Western County Magazine thus maintains throughout its 
seven volumes the same general level of efficiency and interest. 
It deserves remembrance as a happy example of successful mis- 
cellany making in the eighteenth century, but still more as the 
pioneer Wiltshire magazine to devote itself deliberately to matters 
of local and archaeological interest. And it is not perhaps too 
much to claim that it is, in this unique attention to provincial and 
antiquarian subjects, the spiritual if not the lineal ancestor of the 
present Wiltshire Archaeological and Natural History Magazine. 



In making the above study of early South Wilts periodical . 

1 The Western County Magazine issued at the beginning of the month 
following date of publication, so that the terrible events of January, 1793, 
were just taking place when the number for December, 1792, appeared. 



By Mrs. Herbert Richardson. 361 

publications, the writer has been greatly indebted to the kindness 
of the following : — to the Countess of Radnor for access to The 
Detector ; to Mr. W. E. Bennett for access to The Salisbury Post 
Man, and to the files of The Salisbury and Winchester Journal) to 
Mr. Charles Haskins for help in consulting the Salisbury Corpo- 
ration rate-books ; to Miss Georgina Taylor of Bristol, and to the 
authorities at the British Museum (particularly to Mr. Daniel 
Baxter), at Stationers' Hall, the Bristol Public Library, Exeter 
Public Library, Library of the Devon and Exeter Literary Insti- 
tution, Blackmore Museum at Salisbury, Reference Library at 
Bath, and Library of the Bath Royal Literary and Scientific In- 
stitution, for opportunities of consulting early Failey newspapers 
and other material bearing on the career of Samuel Farley ; to Mr. 
Charles Wells of the Bristol Times and Mirror for valuable in- 
formation about the Farleys and for reading through The Salisbury 
Post Man portion of the manuscript; and to many friends and 
correspondents interested in local history and in the development 
of the early provincial press for helpful suggestions and criticisms. 

\_To be continued], 



Correction. 

In the account of The Marlborough Times, now the Wilts, Berks, and 
Hants County Paper, it was stated on p. 136 that the price was raised in 
March, 1918, from Ihd. to 2i , and that the number of pages was reduced 
during the War from six to four. Mr. H. G. Perkins has called attention 
to the fact that the price remained at l%d., and that although the number 
of pages was reduced to four it very shortly reverted to six again. Ed. 



352 



NOTES. 
Flans of Wiltshire Earthworks. Between the years 1901 

and 1909, the Rev. Edward A. Downman, of Laindon, Essex, executed 
for the Society, at a cost of from Is. 6d. to 2s. each, a series of seventy 
beautifully- drawn plans of all the principal earthworks in Wiltshire, 
exclusive of the ditches and barrows. Each of these plans is on a 
separate sheet, 15^in. x llin., or in a few cases, double this size, and 
they are now arranged loose in a portfolio in alphabetical order amongst 
the Society's collection of Drawings and Prints. They are drawn to a 
uniform scale of 25 inches to the mile — based on the Ordnance Survey, 
corrected after personal examination by Mr. Downman. Mr. Downman 
executed a duplicate set of these plans for the London Guildhall 
Library. He has also planned a very large number of other earthworks 
in all parts of England. On each sheet various details as to the 
particular earthwork are noted; its site and defensive capabilities, 
sections of the work, entrances, present condition, other works in the 
neighbourhood, &c, &c. In addition there is a short general account 
of the Earthworks of the county and the classes into which they fall. 
The author without hesitation places Silbury as well as Marlborough 
Castle Mound amongst the Norman works erected after 1066 A.D., an 
opinion it will be remembered which has been strongly urged by Sir 
William St. John Hope more recently. The list of Norman works or 
" Mote Castles " in Wiltshire, given by Mr. Downman, is as follows :— 
Norwood, Bincknoll, Old Sarum, Stapleford, Silbury, Sherrington, 
Marlborough, West Dean, Devizes, Downton, Ludgershall, Mere, 
Clack, Castle Combe. To these might perhaps be added Great Somer- 
ford Mounds not mentioned by Mr. Downman. 
Earthworks of Wiltshire. MS. Plans by E. A. Downman, 1901 
—1909. 

Kings Play Down 

Knook Castle 

Lidbury 

Liddington[CowDown 

Longbridge Deverill Sherrington 

Ludgershall Castle Sidbury 

Mancombe Down Silbury Hill 

Marlborough Common Soldier's Ring 

Marlborough Castle Southleigh Circle 
Mount Stagbury Hill 

MarlboroughOldBowl- Stapleford Castle 
ing Green 

Martinsell Camp 

Martinsell, Giant's 
Grave 

Mem bury 

M ere Castle 

Mere Down 

Morgan's Hill 

Norwood Castle 

Ogbury 

Old Sarum 

Oldbury 

Oliver's Castle 

Ringsbury 



Alton Down [Camp 

Amesbury( Vespasian's 

Avebury 

Barbury 

Battlesbury 

Bincknoll 

Bratton 

Broad Blunsdon 

Bury Ditches 

Casterley 

Castle Combe 

Castle Ditches 

Castle Rings 

Chaddenwich (Mere) 

Chisbury 

Chiselbury 

Clack Mount 

Clearbury 

Cricklade 

Devizes Castle 

Downton Moot 

East Castle (Langford) 

Figs bury 

Fosbury 

Hill Deverill 



Robin Hood's Bower 
Rushmore 
Rybury 

Scratchbury [Mount 
Castle 



Stonehenge 

Stourton 

Wansdyke 

West Dean Mount 

Whitesheet Castle 

Whitsbury 

Wick Ball 

Win Green 

Winkelbury 

Winterbourne Stoke 

"British Village" 
Winterbourne Stoke 

" Coniger " 
Yarnbury 

E. H. GODDARD. 



Notes. 353 

Romano-British Interments at Broad Town. One of 

the large volumes of Canon Jackson's notes on Wiltshire Parishes — 
that lettered on the outside " Wanborough— Wyley," now in the Library 
of the Society of Antiquaries, contains a copy of a letter from Broad 
Town, which seems worth recording. The writer was a young man, 
grandson of a retired incumbent of Broad Town : — 
" Having received Information that a skeleton had been found on 
the Down by some labourers I examined the spot. About 200 yds. 
from the road I found the skeleton of a person of about 20 years 
of age — bones small — I think a female. The men in digging broke 
the skull and also a small funeral urn. This skeleton was not 
more than 2 feet from the surface and was covered with a sarsen 
stone about 3ft. thick and 4ft. long. I have got great part of the 
skeleton and fragments of the pottery. With the help of a plough- 
man and his horses I removed another sarsen stone under which I 
found the remains of another skeleton and to my great joy I found 
a coin in perfect preservation of Antoninus Pius, I believe. It soon 
found its way into my pocket, the ploughman observing ' O 
Sir, you have worked very hard to take home only a penny.' 
Wm. Randall Farley,Broad Town, WoottonBassett,Oct.5th,1859." 
The coin referred to was pronounced by J. Y. Akerman to be of 
Marcus Aurelius. Canon Jackson appends notes of a subsequent letter 
of Nov. 16th, 1859, from Mr. Farley, in which he gives some particulars 
of the removal of a third sarsen stone — at a depth of 4ft. very black 
earth, under it some bones, two teeth of ox or horse (1), jawbone of 
dog (?), a broken part of a fibula, and quantities of broken pottery. 
The bodies were buried N. and S., with head to north. In each case 
there was a streak of black " charred " wood, 3ft. long, " perhaps the 
shaft of a spear." The discoveries lay in a direct line W. to E. The 
skeleton under the first stone was in a crouched position " with the 
hands raised to the shoulders." 

It is clear from further letters that the spot was in the arable land in 
41 Broad Town Field," just above the hill. The first grave was about 
a furlong from the edge of the hill, the second about 200 yds. to the 
west of the first. At one spot here, above the bill between Clyffe 
Pypard and Broad Town, quantities of Romano- British pottery could 
be found on the surface years ago, before the land was laid down to 
grass. A selection of fragments from this site consisting of examples 
of most of the commoner wares found in North Wilts, thick and thin 
grey and black coated, some with trellis pattern, very coarse thick 
buff or brick coloured, and very thin brick coloured, was sent to Gen. 
Pitt Rivers, about 1878. He answered "All this appears to be Romano- 
British ; it is too hard for anything else, and some of the forms are 
distinctly Romano-British." There are several examples of "bead- 
rims." There is no Samian amongst it. Nearly all of it is lathe-turned 
but there is one fragment apparently hand-made of a vessel like the Late 
Celtic shouldered bowl found at All Cannings Cross Farm, described 
by Mrs. Cunnington in Wilts Arch. Mag , xxxvii , 536 and figured in 



354 Notes. 

Plate II., fig. 2. It is of the same red coated ware and has the same 
parallel fluting above the shoulder. Close -by, in the adjoining 
parish of Clyffe Pypard, at " Cuff's Corner," quite a number of inter- 
ments under large sarsen stones were found by the late Mr. H. N. 
Goddard many years ago. The importance of this Broad Town note 
is that it definitely dates some at all events of these burials under 
sarsens as of the Roman period. Probably the others were also cf 
this time. 

E. H. GODDARD. 

Sarsens at Avetaury broken up, 1799. The following 

extract from a letter written by William Skeat, tenant of the Manor 
Farm at Avebury, to Sir Richard Holford, Master in Chancery, on 
Feb. 19th, 1799, was copied by me from the original then in the pos- 
session of Miss Kemm, of the Manor House, Avebury, Dec. 3rd, 1901. 
It appears to refer to the breaking up of Sarsens on or near the line of 
the Kennet Avenue, very possibly part of the avenue itself : — 

" I received yours dated ye 12th of ffebruary. These are to acquaint 
you that there are now Reddy Broke 60 Loads of Sazon Stone, 
upon Weden [Waden Hill] if you think fitt to have them, or any 
part of them, you may have them at Is. ye load, ye gt stones 
wass Broken out of Mr. Smith's Down by two workmen and by 
them to be sold as aboosd." (Sic) . 

E. H. GODDARD. 

Identification of Wiltshire Barrows, It seems well that 

it should be as widely known as possible that the Salisbury Museum 
has become possessed of a series of the 6 inch Ordnance Maps of Wilts 
covering all the southern half of the county, south of the Pewsey Vale, 
and that on these maps the whole of the barrows have been marked 
with numbers in red ink corresponding with those on the similar set 
of maps for the whole county in the Museum Library at Devizes. These 
numbers also correspond with those given in " A List of Prehistoric, 
Roman, and Pagan Saxon Antiquities in the county of Wilts," printed 
in Wilts Arch. Mag., xxviii., 153 (Dec, 1913). It is therefore now 
possible for anyone interested in any individual barrow to consult 
these maps either at Devizes or Salisbury and having found the number 
attached to it — to look out the reference in the " List " under the name 
of the Parish in which it occurs, where he will find a short statement 
of what is known about it, and references to accounts of it in other 
works, if any such exist. It is hoped that in future in any mention 
of Wiltshire barrows these numbers may always be quoted, and that in 
this way the necessity for a large amount of trouble and research may 
be obviated, and considerably greater, accuracy secured in their 
identification. 

E. H. GODDAED. 

Wiltshire objects in Coniston Museum. I noticed in 

September, 1917, in the Ruskin Museum at Coniston several iron 
objects from the collection of the Rev. E. Meyrick, all mounted on one 






Notes. 365 

card. They were, a socketed iron spearhead and two iron arrowheads 
with long barbs from Hillwood, Aldbourne Chase, and a fragment of a 
sinuous edged horseshoe with T headed nails, and a one edged 
knife from " Badbury Castle." The arrowheads may have been 
mediaeval, the horseshoe was probably Roman or Late Celtic. In con- 
nection with these and apparently from the same collection, are a few 
other iron relics and some good bronze implements, but there is nothing 
to show where these came from, or whether they are of Wiltshire origin, 

E. H. GoDDARD. 

Greek Coins found at Wroughton. In view of the fact 

that the finding of Greek coins in Wilts is a rare occurrence and that . 
their presence may be regarded as a proof of intercourse with the 
Continent in pre-Roman days, it seems worth while to record that on 
March 10th, 1918, Dr. Dismorr, of Wroughton, kindly sent me two 
silver coins which he told me " were dug up in the garden of a cottage 
built about twenty years ago (at Wroughton). The man noticed the 
bigger one and then put the surrounding soil through a sieve and so 
found the little one. With the coins he also dug up what he described 
as part of a drain pipe which he unfortunately broke up." I sent the 
coins up to Mr. G. F. Hill, of the Coin Department at the British 
Museum, and he replied as follows : — " Of your two coins the larger (a 
tetradrachm of Alexander II., or of Philip III. of Macedon)isa modern 
cast. As to the smaller, a half-drachm of Philip III., I do not feel 
certain, but it may be genuine. It is fairly clear that the probability 
is in favour of its having come to Wroughton in modern times, as the 
bigger piece cannot have come in ancient times." This of course seems 
to dispose entirely of the interest of the find. On the other hand, 
however, Dr. Dismorr tells me that he subsequently showed the coins 
to the well-known coin dealers. Messrs. Spink, of Piccadilly, who 
declared that both were genuine. E. H. Goddard. 

Aldbourne. Flint Celts. The late Mr. W. Chandler, of North 
Farm, Aldbourne, collected a series of fifteen ground flint celts, or 
rather portions of celts, for all of them were broken, some showing 
less than half the implement, whilst others had only lost one end. 
Some of these '.are beautifully ground all over, others only slightly 
ground, one is only chipped and not ground, but all of them show a 
white patina, which is precisely similar to that of the very numerous 
broken pieces of ground celts which are found at Windmill Hill, 
Avebury. At Avebury, however, the celts are accompanied by many 
fine arrowheads of various types, whereas Mrs. Chandler tells me that 
no arrowhead was ever brought to Mr. Chandler from North Farm. 
The celts were all found on the farm, but came from several different 
fields. This series of celts has now by the kindness of M rs. Chandler 
been given to the Society's Museum. E. H. Goddard. 

Aldbourne. Roman Coins. Mr. W. Chandler also collected a 
number of Roman coins which from time to time were found on North 



356 Notes. 

Farm, Aldbourne. By the kindness of his widow about 120 of these 
have been given to the Society. Of these about 50 are more or less 
illegible, the majority being 3rd brass of the Constantine period. Of 
those which are legible examples occur from Tiberius, A.D. 14 to 
Theodosius, A.D. 379. A few of the earlier coins are 1st brass, mostly 
much worn or defaced, a few are silver, the rest are 2nd and 3rd brass. 
Examples occur of Tiberius, Vespasian, Trajan, Hadrian, Antoninus 
Pius, Aurelius Antoninus, Alex. Severus,Gallienus, Quintillus, Claudius 
Gothicus, Maximianus, Allectus, Oarausius, Constantius, Constantine 
the Great, Licinius, Crispus, Constantine II., Magnentius, Julian, 
Valentinian, Constantine III., Gordianus, Gratianus, Theodosius, 
Lucilla, and Cleopatra. 

The Westbury Acorn Cup. This famous piece of plate, de- 
scribed in Wilts Arch. Mag., xxxiv., 103—108, and in The Ancestor \ 
April, 1904, appeared again at Christie's on May 1st, 1918, when it 
was sold to " Mutton " for £966. After remaining in the hands of Sir 
J. C. Robinson, of Newton Manor, Swanage, for some years, it was 
exchanged by him with another collector for, if I recollect rightly, a 
valuable dagger. Presumably this collector sold it, for it next appeared 
in 1906, in the shop of Messrs. Crichton, 22, Old Bond Street, London, 
the price asked for it being £1350 at first, and subsequently ^£1500. 
Its recent appearance in Christie's catalogue led to letters from Mr. 
A. F. G. Leveson Gower (Times, April 26th, 1918), inveighing against 
the alienation of Church plate and the like, and from the Rev. R. 
Grosvenor Bartelot, of Fordington (Times, April 28th, 1918), urging 
that it should be restored to Westbury, if possible, and giving the 
following particulars which had not previously been published. Col. 
Thomas Wanklin was married as the register records, to Mary, widow 
of Henry Ley, Earl of Marlborough, at Westbury, on August 7th, 1647. 
The churchwardens' accounts of Dilton (the mother Church) contain 
this record " 1845. 31 October. Leave was given to the Vicar so as to 
dispose of the sacramental plate as with some additions to procure a 
new set for the said purposes." An inventory of Church plate signed 
by Thomas Hewitt, Vicar of Westbury, in 1750, mentions " one large 
gilt silver cup with a foot and a belly which is chased ; and round the 
top of the cup within four lines are contained ithe following words 
'Given to the Church of Westbury by Col. Wancklin and Mary, 
Countess of Marlborough, 1671,' and a cover to the above cup gilt, on 
the outside of which, on the one side of it, it is marked with these 
letters T. W., and on the other side M.M." 

The Wiltshire Gazette, May 2nd, and the Wiltshire Times, May 4th, 
1918, referred to the history of the cup at some length, and reprinted 
parts of the letters to the Times. 

E. {I. GODDARD. 

Elder Wood unlucky to burn. A Clyffe Pypard man faggotting 
up some elder wood for me last winter (1918) remarked that he wouldn't 
have the faggots if they were given him, and that people said it was 



Notes. 357 

unlucky to burn Elder wood. He further said that a year or two ago 
a quantity of elder was cut at Clevancy (in Hilmarton) and that though 
it was good large log wood nobody would have it at a gift and it had 
to be piled up and burnt to get rid of it. E. H. Goddard. 

Roman Silver Finger Rings found at Amesbury. 

My attention has been called to a note in Proceedings ISoc. Ant., I. 
Series, IV., 27, recording the fact that Sir Edmund A ntrobus exhibited 
at a meeting of the Society of Antiquaries three silver rings found at 
Long's Farm, Amesbury, in February, 1843, in a rude urn with a 
number of Roman silver and small brass coins ranging from Postumus 
and Tetricus to Theodosius II., who reigned A.D. 408 — 450. The rings 
have square bezels rudely engraved with four galeated heads, a stag 
couchant with a bird above, and a winged quadruped, respectively. The 
style resembles that of the early Saxon Sceattas, and the date assigned 
to the rings is the latter part of the fifth century. These rings are now 
in the British Museum. {Brit. Museum Catalogue of Finger Ring ■», 
Nos. 1205 — 1207). Mr. T. Sheppard in Hull Museum Publications, 
No. 70, April, 1910, records the finding of a similar ring in a pot with 
late fourth century coins at South Ferriby, Lines. 

E. H. Goddard. 

La Tene I. bronze flbvila found at Charnage. An 

interesting addition to the Society's collection has been given by Mr. 
A. R. White, of Charnage, Mere. Mr. O. G. S. Crawford, F.S.A., whilst 
diligently searching out antiquities of all sorts which have been found 
within a few miles on either side of the Roman road going westwards 
from Old Sarum by Groveley and Great Ridge Wood, visited Charnage 
and kindly sent me drawings of several objects found in the neigh- 
bourhood and preserved by Mr. A. R. White. Amongst them was a 
bronze fibula precisely of the same type as those illustrated and de- 
scribed by myself in Wilts Arch. Mag., xxxv., 398—402, in 1908. I was 
able then to enumerate thirteen examples from Wiltshire of these partic- 
ular fibulae which probably date from at least 200 B.C., and are identical 
with those commonly found in the Late Celtic burials in the Marne dis- 
trict of France. I have not heard of any fresh examples turning up in the 
county until this specimen was found at Charnage. It closely resembles 
Nos. 4 and 5 illustrated at page 399, and now in the Society's Museum. 
It has, however, lost its turned-back "Duck's head " foot. It is of solid 
make with thickened bow with engraved midrib, and measures 2|in. 
in length. As with four other Wiltshire examples the original spring 
has been broken and to repair it a bronze rivet has been run through 
the coils of the spring, on which a pin made of somewhat thinner 
bronze wire than the original spring has been fitted. This pin itself 
has been broken off. The number of known examples from Wiltshire is 
now fourteen. This example was found by flint diggers, in the fork 
between the Mere— Hindon Road and the old " British Trackway " 
running to Whitesheet Hill, on the 600ft. contour line. 

E. H. Goddard. 



358 Notes. 

The Gold Ring of Ethelwulf, father of Alfred the 

Great. Mr. Albert Way, in a paper on "Decorative Processes 
connected with the arts during the Middle Ages," in Arch. Journal, II., 
163 (1845), says " One of the most interesting relics of enamelled art 
which exist in England is the gold ring of Ethelwulf, King of Wessex, 
836—838, father of Alfred the Great. It was found in the parish of 
Laverstock, Hants, in a cart-rut where it had become much crushed 
and defaced. The original form of this remarkable ring is here repre- 
sented (a woodcut is given). Its weight is 11 dwts., 14 gr., and the 
cavities chased on its surface are filled up with a glossy bluish-black 
enamel . . . There seems to be no reasonable ground for questioning 
the appropriation or authenticity of this ornament, which is now pre- 
served in the Medal Room at the British Museum." A footnote refers 
to Archoeologia, VII., 421, Plate XXX., and adds " A representation of 
this ring has been given by Mr. Shaw in his interesting series of Dresses 
and Decorations." Mr. Cooksey, in '''Papers and Proceedings of the 
Hampshire Field Club V., 26, speaks of the ring as found at Laverstoke, 
Hants, between Oakley and Whitchurch, and Prof. Oman, in England 
before the Norman Conquest, p. 425, apparently repeats this statement. 
Mr. F. H. Baring, however, in a paper in Papers and Proc. of the 
Hampshire Field Club, VIII., 97, 1917, points out that this is an 
error, and that the ring was certainly found at Laverstock, Wilts, close 
to Salisbury, and not at Laverstoke, Hants, and he quotes in a footnote 
the following original account from Archoeologia, VIL, 421 :— "March 
22nd, 1781 : Lord Radnor communicated a piece of gold found about 
August, 1780, in a field near Salisbury, in the parish of Laverstoke 
. . . by William Petty, pressed out of a cart rut sideways . . . 
It was carried down to Mr. Howell, a silversmith in Salisbury, who 
gave the man 34s. for it . . . and from Mr. Howell Lord Radnor 
purchased it." 

Saxon Saucer-Shaped Brooch, Mlldenhall. In 1914 

Mr. A. D. Passmore obtained an unusually large (3 inches in diameter) 
Saxon saucer-shaped brooch of gilt bronze. One side of the edge is 
missing. The decoration is a sort of guilloche border enclosing three 
ornaments, each resembling a bell flower springing from two leaves. 
There is nothing like it among the saucer brooches illustrated by Mr. 
E. Thurlow Leeds in Archoeologia, LXIIL, 159 (1912). So far as Mr. 
Passmore could ascertain it was a casual find and nothing else was 
found with it. 

Brass 13th Century Seal found at Swindon. This 

seal in the collection of Mr. A. D. Passmore, of Swindon, shows a fox 
and goose (?) with a tree between them, surrounded by an inscription. ; 
An impression was sent to Sir William. St. John Hope, who says: " The j 
inscription is ' * S' THOME FL'I STEFFAN,' which you may 
render as Thomas, son of Steffan (or Stephen) or Thomas Fitz-Steffan. 
The latter looks grander, but Thomas was probably not ' an armigerous 



Notes. 359 

person ' but a mere yeoman. The seal seems genuine enough though 
worn. Its date is mid 13th century and it belongs to a class of which 
hundreds of examples remain to us" 

Skeleton found at FargO. In the construction of a military 
railway across the Plain, a skeleton was unearthed at Fargo, north of 
the Pack way, in 1918. From- the particulars given by the officer in 
charge it was buried in a " sitting " position. Measurements of skull : 
length 7^in., breadth 5fin., height 6Jin., femur 16|in., humerus ll^in. 
The tibia was platycnemic The remains indicate a male of middle 
age, with strong muscular impression on bones. Teeth all perfect, 
slightly worn down, but no sign of decay. 

It was probably of the Bronze Age. The stature 5ft. 2in. No objects 
were associated with the remains. Careful search was made for the 
same. The skeleton is preserved at the Salisbury Museum, and 
labelled " Fargo No, 1." F. Stevens. 

A Cure for Whooping Cough. My father, the Rev. Francis 
Goddard, Vicar of Hilmarton, wrote in May, 1890, that he recollected 
being told by Miss Maskelyne, of Bupton Farm, in Clyffe Pypard, that 
she was cured of whooping cough as a child by being drawn backwards, 
naked, through a thorn bush on that farm. The date of this was 
probably about 1810. E. H. Goddard. 

A cure for " Low " (abcess in the foot) in Cows. My 

father also noted that this recipe was in use at Alderton in this county 
about 1850. Watch the cow when she lies down in the field, watch her 
when she first rises. Mark the spot on which she first places the dis- 
eased foot. Cut out the piece of turf with your knife, hang it up on a 
white thorn bush ; when it is perfectly dry the foot will be well. 

E. H. Goddard. 

A Cure for Epilepsy. Take a live " Want "—a male, cut its head 
off and drop 10 drops, no more and no less, of the hot blood from the 
head into a tea cup of cold water and give it to the patient (in this case 
a woman) and the fits will be cured. Mr. Harold Brakspear, F.S.A., 
writing in Nov., 1897, says that this remedy was given by an old 
Wiltshire woman to a doctor at Corsham in that year. Query if the 
patient had been a man, would the " Want " have had to be a female? 

Bronze Implements found in Wiltshire not pre- 
viously recorded. [For previous lists see W.A.M., xxxvii., 92, 
455 ; xxxviii., 115 ; xxxix., 477]. 
Durrington. The blade of a rather large broken socketed celt somewhat like 
Evans'i^'<7.124,measuring 3in. in length and2gin.in width at the widened 
cutting edge, with two raised ribs and a ridge at each side, hollow for 
half its length, was found in the ruins of a cottage at Durrington, in 
1918. My attention was drawn to it by Mr. J. Soul, of Amesbury, and 
a careful drawing of it, kindly made by Mr. Percy Fairer, F.S.A., has 
been placed in the collection of drawings at Devizes. The celt remains 
in private hands. 



360 Notes. 

Sling Camp (near Bulford, N". of Sling Plantation). Mr. Percy Farrer 
tells me that in 1914, during the building of the camp, a workman 
found a bronze spear head, described as being very like a modern lance 
head but rather wider in the flanges. Its present whereabouts is un- 
known. 

Mere. Mr. O. G. S. Crawford, F.S.A., has made a drawing (1919), now 
in the Society's collection, of the Bronze " Celt " preserved in the 
small collection of miscellaneous articles in the parvise of the 
Church at Mere. It is a palstave somewhat like Fig. 77 of Evans'. 
Plain, with a single broad midrib dying away on the blade, one side of 
the socket broken off and lost, apparently in ancient times, and the 
edge much chipped and broken away. The patina is dark olive green 
except where the blade has been ground since discovery. Length 5fin,, 
width of blade 2£in. It was found by Mr. Philip Crocker, agent to Sir 
R. C. Hoare, "probably on the Wiltshire downs," and was given to 
the' Church collection by Mr. Ernest Baker. 

Salisbury. A bronze palstave with long slot and expanded cutting edge, 
5|in. long, width of cutting edge 2in., picked up in 1915 at Bishop 
Down, Salisbury, was in the possession of Mr. C. Scam ell, of 51, High 
Street, Salisbury. A full size sketch of it by the Rev. C. V. Goddard 
has been added to the Society's collection of drawings, &c It sub- 
sequently (Sept., 1915) passed into the collection of Mr. R. S. Newall, of 
Fisherton Delamere. Similar to Evans' Fig. 60 except that it has no 
stop. 

Sidbury Hill. Mr. O. G. S. Crawford, F.S.A., has called my attention to 
the following notice in Proc. iSoc. Ant. 2 S. ix. 1883, p. 227 (Jan. 18th, 
1883) which had escaped my notice. 

" C. E. Keyser, Esq., F.S.A., exhibited by permission of Sir John 
Kelk, Bart., of Tedworth, Hampshire, a bronze axehead, of the class 
described by Mr. John Evans as a winged celt, with stopridge. Its 
dimensions are :— extreme length, 6|in. ; width of cutting edge, fin. ; 
breadth at stopridge, |in. The axehead was found about 6 weeks ago 
by a boy, while ploughing on the slopes of Sidbury Hill, in Wiltshire, 
in the parish of N. Tidworth. . . ." 

Charnage, or Chaddenwick, near Mere. The Society is also indebted to 
Mr. Crawford for a drawing and description of a large and fine looped 
and socketed bronze Celt in the possession of Mr. A. R. White, of this 
place, found in 1909, about 200 yards N.E. of Charnage Farm, in the 
course of laying a pipe. It is in good condition with plain heavy neck 
mould and three narrow raised ribs somewhat flattened by hammering. 
It resembles Figs. 125 and 126 of Evans, and measures 4|in. in length 
with a curved edge of 2in. in width. 

Aldbourne. A bronze socketed and looped spearhead found some years 
ago betweemAldbourne and Chilton Foliat, is in Mr. A. D. Passmore's 
collection at Swindon. It has a plain narrow blade with pronounced 
midrib running down to the point with the loops about Jin. from the 
base of the blade, resembling Fig. 394 in Evans. An outline sketch is 
in the Society's collection. E. H. Goddard. 



Notes, 3Q i 

Bromham and Heddington Boundaries. Transcript of a 

foolscap paper concerning the repair of the old London Road between 
Beacon Hill and Wans Corner. This is one of seventeen papers pre- 
pared a-t the time of a dispute between the parishes of Bromham and 
Heddington about the year 1635. Transcribed by W. A. Webb. 
_ No. 13. " Mr. Webbe wher as you intreate my knowledge concern- 
ing the boundes between hedington and bromham, according to your 
desier I have heare sent you what I remember was done in my time 
and also what I think of it. 

ffirst I say I doe not remember that ever the inhabitants of Bromham 
did ever mende or repair thewaies or contribut with hedington's men 
below the hill before owld Sir Edward Baynton's time, nither in his 
time till humphery Townsind cam to serve him and in my understand- 
mge they had no reson to do it because helack is all pt hedington : 
and no part of Bromham for Bromham boundes the procession went 
over from Bromham Park pale by masons breach and so keeping the 
cley dich to the hill above bagdon bridge. Also I remember that 
humphery townsend beinge very inward with Sr. Edward Baynton 
p'suaded him to give waye for the inhabitants of Bromham to assist 
hedington in the mendinge of helack way : which I remember at Sir 
Edwardes p'swasion we consented to : but we did it with very unwilling 
hartes and grudginge minds : only because we were loth to displease 
Sir Edward. The reasons wherf ore Sir Edward was p'suadid by Town - 
sind to yeld yt wee of Bromham should asiste Hedington was that wee 
mending pte of helacke waye it wolde bee an Evidence for Sir Edward 
and his eyers to chalenge strayes and felons goods that were taken 
there but if any such thinge did hapen there as never yet did neyther 
doe I think ever will I dowte whether Mr. Wells will sufer Sr Edward 
to carie it away for out of dowte Bromham never yet did chalenge nor 
I think can any pte. or pcell of helacke waye to be of bromham for 
Bromham out of dougt can chalenge nothing with out Bromham park 
masins breach and the cley dich and before we were drawne in to yeld 
we never mended but the hill. Also I remember that hedington's 
inhabitants never mended above hill before we of Bromham befooled 
our selves to yeld to that agreement : but whether this Agreement will 
tye you to continue it I know not. I remember the agreement and 
the platter we consented to amend in helack waye which before I say 
againe was never dune by us nor our forfathers as I can remember or 
ever heard and this is as much as I can say concerning helack way. 

"but toching the boundes between hedington & bromham above hill 
I remember I was at the piching of a great fre stone between the too 
Lordshipps on the hill at which time ther was at the least fortie of us 
the inhabitants of Bromham: Sir me thinkes if it be demanded of 
heddington's inhabitants how far the Lordshipp of Bromham goes 
towardea them they will alow you no-further then T have mentioned. 

44 Yf they be demanded how long bromham hath assisted them for the 
mendinge of helack way : and themselves to mende the hill I ham suer 
VOL. XL.— NO. CXXX. 2 D 



362 Notes. 

they can not sweare justly for no longer time : then the foolish agree- 
ment we consented to by humphery Townsins meanes and this is as 
much as I can say of my knowledge. 

" Sir my age is the first yeare of Queen Elizabeth and what I 
have sett down heareis upon my creditt that which I can 
sweare to yf I vvher hable to travell. 

" Yor louinge frend Andrew White." 

The Derivation Of Imber. Through the kindness of Mr. W. H. 
Stevenson I am able to communicate the solution of an old problem, 
the derivation of the name Imber. The documentary evidence is com- 
plete, and only needs to be rightly interpreted. The chief variants 
in the spelling of the name are as follows : — in Domesday Book, 
Imemerie; in documents of the reigns of Henry II. and Richard I. 
Immere, which is the usual form ; in a document in the Edington 
Chartulary, of the year 1183 Hymbemere ; in a document of the reign 
of Henry III., Immemere ; in later documents, Immer. 

The form in Domesday Book, ending -rie, is the result of a slight 
corruption, through a mis-reading of the Anglo-Saxon r as ri, a mistake 
which is often found, since the right arm of the r is often protracted 
downwards. The form Immemere represents a late O.E. Imme-mere, 
which must be in full Immanmere, with the genitive of the masculine 
personal name Imma. The forms Hymbemere and Imber, the latter the 
modern writing and pronunciation, are easily explained : they are 
simply an instance of the intrusive b between two liquids in successive 
syllables, as in chamber, number, humble, and the vulgar corruption 
chimbley. Mere might be "lake," but since this does not agree with 
the local features, it more probably means " boundary " ; then we may 
perhaps compare it with ButUrmere (Buthar?), a parish on the borders 
of Wiltshire and Hampshire, south of Hungerford; and also Mere, 
which is on the border of "Wiltshire and Dorset. Here I have never 
been fully content with the recent view (see W.A.M , vol. xxxiv., p. 290) 
that Mere means " lake " or " marsh" and prefer the older view of 
" boundary." In support of this view that Imme-mere means " Imma's 
boundary," it is worth noticing that Imber originally consisted of two 
parts, Imber North Fart and Imber South Part, divided by the road 
and watercourse which run through the village. 

The derivation of another place called Imbtr, in Thames Ditton 
Surrey, is different. This represents Immanweor'S ; and the name is 
written Immeworth in the fourteenth century ; and from the chrono- 
logical evidence given at the beginning of this note, this termination, 
cannot be assumed for the Wiltshire Imber. 

I take this opportunity of making a correction in W.A.M., vol. xxxiv., 
p. 274, on the derivation of Codjord. The oldest form is Cote ford, in 
Domesday Book ; and this should not be discarded for Coed-ford, 
which appears to be an antiquary's guess, for which there is no 
documentary authority. 

J. U Powell. 



Notes. 363 

Notes On Tockenham. [These notes were written by the late 
late VV. F. Parsons, of Hunt's Mill, Wootton Bassett, in Sept., 1897.] 
According to the testimony of aged men of this place it could be re- 
membered by them that the parish clerk sold beer on the Sunday and 
Monday afternoons, when the village feast was celebrated, the Monday 
after the festival of St. Giles, at the site of the " Cross Elm," a large 
tree which was blown down many years ago, which stood on the 
east side of the road near the rickyard on the south of the old mansion 
at Tockenham Wick. This was, there is no doubt, the Clerk's Ale, 
similar to that formerly held at Chiseldon, and held as lately as 1854, 
on Easter Tuesday, which Aubrey described as being kept for " the 
clerk's private benefit and the solace of the neighbourhood." Sometimes 
backs wording or singlestick was carried on at these times under the 
auspices of the Squire, in the " Horse Close," very near to the " Cross 
Elm." 

From a memorandum which has been preserved the " Cross Elm " 
was two miles and forty-two perches from Wootton Bassett Church 
tower, one mile and thirty-two perches from Tockenham Church, and a 
mile all but a few yards from Vastern Wilderness. In an old map 
formerly at Tockenham, the position of this tree could be seen. It was 
made, there is no doubt, by the notorious John Ayliffe, who after he 
left Harrow School (according to the late Canon Jackson), was with a 
surveyor for some time. This was most likely to have been Adam 
Tuck, then residing at Langley, near Chippenham. He was the son of 
Mr. Tuck, of Freegrove, Lyneham, and like Ayliffe, acquired much 
notoriety, being concerned in the imprisonment of the Sheriff" of Wilts 
for interfering in the election at Chippenham. He was also steward 
of the Manor of Grittenham for Mrs. Horner (before Ayliffe held that 
post), with whom he was in pecuniary difficulties. He was steward to 
Lord Cornbury for the Wootton Bassett Manor and also Town Clerk 
of Wootton Bassett. In 1751 he took his departure from thence in 
disgrace, taking with him the charter and corporation books. (By a 
vote of the corporation, Sept. 26th,l751, he was ignominiously expelled). 
The charter was found by Mr. Owen, of Goppa, Denbigh, in 
1859, among the contents of a box belonging to a Captain Tuck, but 
the old books have never been recovered. The present ones commence 
Sept. 26th, 1751. His brother, Mr. John Tuck, married on the 6th 
Sept., 1731, Miss Susannah Brinsdon, daughter of the Hector of Tocken- 
ham, and sister to John Ayliffe's wife. There was once a water mill 
in Tockenham. It was situated at a spot over which the Great Western 
Railway now passes, almost at the corner of the Tockenham estate, 
and not far from the " Hart " or " Halfs " Farm, on the Wootton Bassett 
estate. Traces of the small millpond can be distinctly seen close to 
the railway. This, there is no doubt, is the mill mentioned in Domesday, 
and assessed or valued at fifty pence. The stream from the Blind 
Mill, Lyneham, which passed by Trow Lane, was diverted, near Chesley 
Hill Farm, by a dam being placed across it, and another was made 
between the Coombs and Vastern Farm and the Tockenham property 

2 D 2 



364 Notes. 

to turn the water (formerly called the canal) which comes through 
Teagle's Copse from Shaw House Farm, &c, the two streams being 
united near the Mill, the meadows adjoining which are still called 
" Mill Hay " and " Mill Close." Most of the Tockenham people know, 
no doubt, of the " Vineyard." This was in what is now " Teagle's 
Copse," on the north side and a little to the west of the " Black Dog," 
or what is now known as " Radnor Cottages " on the south side. This 
is the wood on the north of the Wootton Bassett and Chippenham road, 
which is remarkable for being in such a wide and deep ravine. This 
very sheltered and sunny spot, with a stony subsoil, would seem to 
render it an admirable place for a vineyard, which it was undoubtedly 
in ancient times, but from information which has been gleaned on the 
subject, there is reason for supposing that Mr. Goddard Smith, a few 
years before his death in 1746, planted some vines there, the sets for 
which he had from Wanstead, Essex, which then belonged to his friend, 
Sir Robert Long, of Dray cot, as also from Mr. Talbot, at Lacock Abbey, 
on which he was congratulated for his public spirit. He also kept 
trout in the small gravelly stream (or canal) through the copse, the 
stock being sometimes replenished from Draycot. 

Lydiard Millicent Natural History Notes. The Rev. 

D. P. Harrison, writing Aug. 22nd, 1918, says:— "Of Butterflies I 
have taken the following, Melitcea artemis, Marsh Fritillary, two 
specimens, 1916. Numerous 1917 and 1918 in May and beginning 
of June in a small restricted area in this parish. Grapta C. 
Album, one seen 1917. Caught about two dozen in Brockhurst Wood 
this July, 1918. [Brockhurst Wood is in Purton parish.] Thecla W. 
Album. One specimen caught in Brockhurst, July 6th, 1918. Could 
find no more. Both Argynnis adippe (very scarce) and Melitcea selene 
in small numbers were to be found in Brockhurst this year. I also 
found Limenitis sybilla (a few only) in Brockhurst this year. I have 
also seen many specimens this year of Syrex gigas, the huge hornet- 
like fly, which is so destructive by boring into fir trees. It has been a 
great year for Dragon Flies. I have identified Libellula depressa 
(common), Libdlula quadrimaculata, Orthetrum cancellatum (very 
rare and very like depressa, but I caught two and identified them) 
JEschna mixta, Cordulegaster a7bnulatus ) JEschnajuncea,2Eschna cyanea. 
I think Anax Imperator but this I could not catch, and am uncertain 
therefore. The Little Owl is quite settled in this neighbourhood, and 
I knew of at least three nests which hatched out. It first appeared 
three years ago. The Redstart, which I have not seen for many years 
in this neighbourhood, has bred this year in three cases. The Pied 
Flycatcher again this year appeared for about a couple of days about 
the 6th— 10th of May. With the exception of last year and 1914 
I have seen it on migration every year since 1909. It never stops more 
than a couple of days. Only in 1911 did I see a female. A curious 
movement of Gulls took place in July, 6th to 14th. I identified the 
Lesser Blackback, the Herring, the Black-headed, and one Great 
Blackback. It is a curious month in which to see them passing over, 



Notes. 365 

and I cannot quite divine the reason. They were all old birds, ap- 
parently. All were going S.W." 

I have come across several specimens ef the yellow form of Mus 
sylve&tris. I think it is only a variety, though some give it specific 
value. I also found, dead in the road, a specimen of the Pygmy Shrew." 

A Common Buzzard, Buteo buteo, in immature plumage, was shot by 
a keeper in Lydiard Park on Sept. 30th, 1918. It was knocking down 
pheasants and had killed three without, however, descending into the 
undergrowth to devour them." 

Mr. Harrison also reports (1919) another scarce Dragon Fly, Gomphus 
vulgatissimus ; a white Letter H airstreak ( Thecla W. album) in the 
Vicarage Garden, Lydiard Millicent, and White Admiral {Lymenitis 
sybilla) as occuring in some numbers in more than one wood near 
Lydiard. Also four Duke of Burgundy Fritillary (Nemeobius lucina) 
taken on June 6th and 7th. 

Kentish Plover in Wilts ? Mr. J. C. Laidlaw,writing on "The 
War and its effects on Birds " in Country Life, Sept. 2nd, 1916, p. 274, 
says ; — " In Wiltshire I was lucky enough to be in a camp near some 
downs on which the rare Kentish Plover were nesting, and on 
manoeuvres there had sometimes one or more of these strange little 
birds quite close to me, circling round, showing great signs of distress 
at their formerly lonely nesting site being so frequently disturbed. 
Right in the middle of this camp in an ancient and lofty elm tree a pair 
of Hobbies had their nest and, despite the efforts made to pillage it, 
successfully reared their brood." The locality is not in any way 
identified. The Kentish Plover, or Kentish Dotterel, is not mentioned 
by Smith as having occurred in Wilts. Can the writer have mistaken 
the bird 1 Was it really a Dotterel, or Ringed Dotterel 1 

Little Owl at Netherstrest. Mr. R. G. Gwatkin reported on 
Oct. 21st, 1917, that a Little Owl had been killed by Mr. Leonard at 
Netherstreet, Bromham. It was identified by Mr. Gwatkin. 

Rare Plants. Mrs. Ruddle, of Durrington, writing in July, 1917, 
reported a single plant of Asperugo procumbens at Durrington, and Sisym- 
brium irio as growing freely in two places on Durrington Down, one 
quite near Stonehenge, and also by*the side of the road leading from 
Milston to the down, so that though the former may be only a "casual," 
the latter seems quite established. She also reported Senebiera corono- 
pus and Lepidium ruderale from Durrington, the latter not mentioned 
, by Preston. Curiously enough several plants of this (L. ruderale) were 
found in Aug., 1917, at Holt Station by myself . Probably its presence 
is due to the introduction of army fodder. Mr. C. P. Hurst, of Great 
Bedwyn, reports that on the 3rd of July, 1919, Dr. A. Adams, of Looe, 
found Epipactis palustris on boggy ground near Folly Farm, 1^ miles 
S.E. of Great Bedwyn, and at the same place his son, Mr. S. H. Adams 
found Eriophorum latifolium (Broad-leaved Cotton-Sedge). Both were 
in some quantity. The former has been recorded from three other 
localities in Wilts ; the latter appears to be a new record for the county. 

E. H. GODDARD. 



366 Notes. 

Tudor Embroidery at Steeple Ashton Vicarage 

In a cupboard under the stairs at Steeple Ashton Vicarage amongst 
odds and ends taken over from the previous Vicar in 1897 was found 
in 1905 a bundle containing three strips of Tudor embroidery which 
had evidently formed the hangings of the top of a four-post bedstead, 
It appears that it had once been taken out, aired, peppered, and 
wrapped up again by an old servant in Canon Bond's time (1889—1897), 
but there was nothing to show its previous history. It had been 
recently carefully mounted on green linen by Mrs.- Knubley, acting 
under expert advice. It consists of seven scenes from the early life of 
Christ, the Annunciation, Salutation, Nativity, Circumcision, Adoration 
of the Magi, Presentation in the Temple, and Flight into Egypt. It 
was given to the third Red Cross sale at Christie's in April, 1917, and 
was described in the Times as a " very beautiful and interesting piece 
of Tudor embroidery." It was sold to Mr. Jourado for 320 guineas. 
Wiltshire Gazette, April 12th, 1917. 

Norman Stones in the front of No. 20, Long Street, 

Devizes. In June, 1915, the front of this house was stripped of its 
lath and plaster covering and under this was found a very thick stone 
wall built of stones of uniform size, into which various carved stones 
were built. Some of these bore the Norman chevron ornament, and 
retained traces of whitewash or ochre, showing that they came from an 
inside wall. They evidently came either from the Castle or from one 
of the Churches. The front was again covered with new lath and 
plaster. Wiltshire Gazette, July 8th, 1915. 

AldbOUrne. BarrOW 19a. (List of Prehistoric Antiquities, Sfc. 
Wilts Arch. Mag., xxxviii, 157) This disc barrow on the Baydon 
boundary cut by the Ermine Street, is not shown on the Ordnance 
Survey, but appears in the maps of Stations XI. XII. in Ancient Wilts. 
No particulars are given of it in the "List," but Mr. A. D. Passmore 
writes, March 4th, 1918: — "This was opened some years ago by the 
late W. Chandler, of Aldbourne. I remember talking to him about it, 
and he said that after cutting out all the middle nothing was found. 
He seemed to think that there never had been an interment in the 
centre." 

Stoneh enge given to the Nation. The Times of Sept. 25th, 

1 918, printed the following letter to Sir Alfred Mond, First Commissioner 
of Works from Mr. C. H. E. Chubb, of Bemerton Lodge, announcing his 
gift of the monument to the nation. The letter was copied into the 
local Wiltshire papers. 

" Stonehenge is, perhaps, the best-known and the most interesting of 
our national monuments, and has always appealed strongly to the 
British imagination. 

" To me, who was born close to it and during my boyhood and youth 
visited it at all hours of the day and night, under every conceivable 
condition of weather — in driving tempests of hail, rain, and snow, 



Notes. 367 

fierce thunderstorms, glorious moonlight, and beautiful sunshine, it 
always has had an inexpressible charm. 

" I became the owner of it with a deep sense of pleasure, and had 
contemplated that it might remain a cherished possession of my family 
for long years to come. 

"It has, however, been pressed upon me that the nation would like 
to have it for its own and would prize it most highly. 

" I, therefore, have decided to give up this unique possession and 
offer it to you, His Maje&ty's First Commissioner of Works, as a gift 
to be held for the nation. 

" It brings in a revenue and its possession would be far from an ex- 
pense. If my wife and I may express a wish, though far from making 
it a condition of the gift, we should be glad if during the continuance 
of the war^the income could be handed to the Red Cross Society, whose 
work at the present time is of such great national value. This point, 
however, must be entirely within your discretion." 

The answer of the First Commissioner of Works accepting the gift 
for the nation, in suitable terms, was published at the same time, and 
it was stated that arrangements would be made to carry out Mr. Chubb's 
suggestion as to the disposal of the gate money (about £360 a year) 
during the war. The monument thus passed into the possession and 
under the care of the Ancient Monuments Board at once, and every 
Wiltshireman, whether he knows anything of archaeology or not, will 
rejoice that it has fallen to a Wiltshireman to set such an example of 
generous patriotism, and will appreciate the spirit in which the offer of 
the gift was made. 

A letter from Canon H. D. Rawnsley in The Times of Sept. 28th 
made the rather unhappy suggestion that " At Midsummer day of each 
year or at stated intervals a solemn service should be held (at Stone- 
henge) in memory not only of Wiltshire men but of all the men of the 
British Empire who have died for right against might, for justice, 
freedom, and peace . . . Nothing would be needed but a huge 
stone Celtic cross in the neighbourhood of the circle, with a simple 
dedication to the imperishable memory of the gallant dead." 

In The Times, Oct. 2nd, Lord Eversley once more returned to the 
charge in the matter of " Freedom of access " which he still regards as 
the one thing needful, an opinion controverted in subsequent letters 
by the Rev. G. H. Engleheart, and Prof. T. E. Holland, the latter also 
deprecating Canon Rawnsley's suggestion. 

The formal presentation of the deed coriveying Stonehenge to the 
nation by Mr. C. H. E. Chubb to Sir Alfred Mond, M.P., First Com- 
missioner of Works, took place at Stonehenge on Saturday, Oct. 26th, 
1918, when a considerable company assembled, though the numbers 
would have been no doubt very much larger had it not been for the 
existing petrol restrictions. Mr. Chubb, standing on one of the fallen 
stones, handed the deed to Sir Alfred Mond with a short speech in the 
spirit of his letter quoted above — and Sir Alfred Mond expressed the 
gratitude of the Government and the nation for the self-denying and 



368 Notes, 

munificent gift. Me also touched on the vexed question of the fencing. 
- The monument he said could not be left entirely open and unguarded, 
but he hoped that a sunk fence which would not be seen would replace 
the existing wire, and that the site would be thoroughly explored in 
the future. Sir C. Hercules Read, of the British Museum, dwelt on 
the fact that Stonehenge, which had doubtless belonged to the nation 
over 3000 years ago had now come back into its possession again. Sir 
Arthur Evans, as President of the Society of Antiquaries, spoke of 
the monument as a temple in the centre of a great prehistoric cemetery. 
Lt..Gen. Sir Henry Slater, G.O.C., Southern Command, said a few 
words on behalf of the army on the Plain ; and Mr. VV. Heward Bell, 
as President of the Wiltshire Archseological Society, thanked Mr. 
Chubb on behalf of the county and" spoke of the origin of the sarsen 
stones of the monument which must have come from the Marlborough 
Downs, as sarsens were never present on the Plain in any number or 
size. Dr. Macgregor Reid, who announced himself as the representative 
of the " Latterday Druids or Universal Bond of the Sons of Men," ex- 
pressed his satisfaction at the moument passing into the hands of the 
nation, as there would be no Obstacle in future to his co-religionists 
performing their worship on the site on Midsummer Day. Amongst 
those present were Sir Lionel Earle, Permanent Secretary of the Office 
of Works; Mr. C. H. Peers, Inspector of Ancient monuments ; The 
Rev. G. Engleheart, The Rev. E. H. Goddard, Col. Hawley, and the 
Mayor of Salisbury (Mr. J. Macklin). Some account of the proceedings 
appeared in most of the daily and local papers, but the best and fullest 
report was given by the Salisbury Journal, Nov. 2nd, 1918. 

Occurrence of Chirocepkalus diaphanus in Saver nake 

Forest. This interesting freshwater custacean, known to some as 
the "Fairy Shrimp," was first noticed on June 11th, 1917. It was 
then very abundant in a small pool between the column ride and Lush 
Hill. The majority of the specimens measured about lin. in length 
and carried mature ova. One was strongly reminded of a pool on the 
sea-shore filled with young prawns. The pool was visited a week later 
and found to have dried up and no living specimens of Chirocephalus 
were to be found. On June 30th some rain fell and the pool again 
contained water and on July 17th numbers of specimens were observed 
at a somewhat earlier stage of development than those first noticed. 
This strange appearance of Chirocephalus in ponds which frequently 
dry up has I believe been noticed in other localities, but I am not 
aware that it has been satisfactorily explained. In this case attempts 
to hatch the ova have so far failed. During the present season (1918) 
there has been no water in the pool from the early spring till the 
present week of rain (July 17th) and in consequence Chirocephalus has 
not so far made its appearance. A. Joyces Watson. 



869 



WILTS OBITUARY. 

Capt. John Randall, R.Cx A , s. of William Randall, of Trow, 
bridge, died of pneumonia Feb. 17th, 1919. He enlisted in the artillery 
1904, served in India 1906 — 1912, went to France as sergeant 1914. 
Gained commission August, 1915, for special service in the field. 
Severely wounded Nov. 1916, and afterwards served with Reserve 
Brigade at Prees Heath. Lieut., 1917 ; Capt., Nov , 1918. 
Obit, notice, with portrait, Wiltshire Times, March 1st, 1919. 

Capt. Tom Q M. Parker, L.D.S, R.C.S., R A.MC. 

Died Nov. 3rd, 1918, aged 28, of pneumonia at the Military Hospital, 
Christchurch, Buried at Christclmrch Cemetery. S. of Lewis J. 
Parker, of 26, Castle Street, Salisbury, educated at Chorister's School, 
Salisbury, and Dean Close School, Cheltenham. Qualified as surgeon 
dentist and assisted in his father's practice. Joined Canadian Army 
Dental Corps 1915, and was transferred to R.A.M.C. and stationed at 
Christchurch. 
Obit, notice, Salisbury Journal, Nov. 9th, 1918. 

Lieut, ColiU Paget. Killed in action at Baku, Sept. 1st, 191 8. S. of 

George Paget, of Nether3treet. Educated Bromham School, Devizes 
Secondary School, and Culham Training College. Assistant master at 
Wargrave School, Berks. Joined the Territorials on the outbreak of 
war, went to India, received a commission, returned home for training, 
and went to Mesopotamia and on the Baku expedition. 
Obit, notice Wiltshire Gazette, April 10th, 1919. 

2nd Lieut. Douglas Gilbert Hay ward Aldworth, 

Royal Berks Regiment. Drowned in the " Leinster " on his way to 
France, Oct. 10th, 1918. B. Aug. 30th, 1899, only s. of Rev. Arthur E. 
Aldworth, Vicar of Laverstock. Educated at Honiton, Salisbury, and 
Sandhurst. 2nd Lieut. 3rd Royal Berks; May, 1918. 
Portrait in Sphere, Nov. 23rd, 1918. 

2nd Lieut. Reginald Arthur Bakewell Warrilow, 

R.A.F. Killed in flying accident at Beaulieu, Hants, January 13th, 
1919, aged 24. Buried at St. Paul's, Chippenham. S. of J. Bakewell 
Warrilow, of Chippenham. 

Photo, Wiltshire Times, Feb. 1st, 1919, 

Canon Dacres Olivier, died Jan. 7th, 1919, aged 87. Buried at 
Wilton. Educated, Christchurch, Oxford, B.A. 1853, M.A. 1855. 
Deacon 1854, priest 1855 (Norwich). Curate of Great Yarmouth, 1854 
— 59 ; Chaplain to the Bishop of Moray and Ross, 1859—60; Curate of 
Wilton, 1860—67; Rector of Wilton, 1867—1912, when he resigned. 
Rural Dean of Wilton, 1885—97 ; Canon and Prebendary of Salisbury. 
1874 until his death. Domestic chaplain to the Earl of Pembroke, 1 895. 
He had thus been Curate and Rector of Wilton for fifty-two years and 
had long been well known throughout the Diocese of Salisbury. 
Obit, notice, Wiltshire Gazette, Jan. 9th, 1919. 



370 Wilts Obituary. 

Canon Edgar Nembhard Thwaites, died April 20th, 1919, 

at Bournemouth, aged 80. Buried at St. John's, Boscombe. Deacon, 
1862 (Carlisle), priest 18G5 (Gloucester and Bristol). Curate of St. 
John's, Keswick, 1862—65; Rector of Blaisdon (Gloucs.), 1866—73; 
Rector of Fisherton Anger, Salisbury, 1873— 1914, when he retired to 
live at "Boscombe, Bournemouth. Preb. and Canon of Sarum, 1908. 
He represented for more than a generation the evangelical side of the 
Church at Salisbury with great earnestness and vigour, and was ex- 
traordinarily successful in the enthusiasm he inspired in his parish and 
in the city generally for the cause of foreign missions as represented by 
the Church Missionary Society. During his incumbency a north aisle 
and organ chamber and organ were added to the Church at Fisherton 
and the Maundrell Hall was built at a cost of i;4500 as a centre for 
evangelistic work. He also built the Infant Schools. On his retire- 
ment in April, 1914, he was presented with a cheque for £400. 

Obit, notices, Salisbury Journal, May 3rd, 1919 ; Salisbury Diocesan 
Gazette, June, 1919. 

Canon Herbert Chidley Coote, died May 14th, 1919, aged 

58. CC.O, Camb. B.A. 1884, M.A. 1888. Ridley Hall, Camb., 
1884. Deacon 1885, priest 1886 (Glouc. and Bristol). Curate of Christ 
Church, Clifton, 1885—89 ; Vicar of St. Paul, Poole, 1889—92 ; St. 
John Evan., Wimbourne, 1894 — 1905; Rector of Stanbridge, 1896— 
1905 ; Diocesan Inspector of Schools, 1901 — 11 ; Rector of Trowbridge, 
1905—11 : Rector of St. Peter's, Dorchester, 1912 until his death. 

Obit, notice, Wiltshire Times, May 24th ; Salisbury Diocesan Gazette, 
June, 1919. 

Canon Charles Dundas Horatio Mc Millan, died 

almost suddenly May 5th, 1919, aged 55. Buried at Nailsea (Som ). 
S. of Charles S. Mc Millan, of Bristol. Educated at King's School 
Bruton, and Wadham Coll., Oxon. B.A. 1888, M.A. 1892. Deacon 
1889, priest 1890 (Wakefied). Curate of Stanley (Yorks), 1889—91 ; 
Wakefield, 1891— 2 ; Vicar of St. John Evan., Wakefield, 1892—1907 ; 
Hon. Canon of Wakefield, 1906—7 ; Vicar of Malmesbury and Westport, 
1907, until his death; R. Dean of Malmesbury, 1911—1919; Hon. 
Canon of Bristol, 191 1. He was for some time chairman of the Wakefield 
School Board and alike at Wakefield and at Malmesbury took a 
considerable part in the life of the community. He married, 1890, 
Alice Mary, eldest d. of Samuel Mackenzie, of Bayswater, who survives 
him. He had no children. He was the author of : — 

" Sermon preached in Malmesbury Abbey Church, Sunday, 
Nov. 16th, 1913." Printed in full in Wiltshire Gazette,Nov. 20th, 

"The Sleeping Cardinal and other sermons preached in 
Malmesbury Abbey. London : Robert Scott. 1914." 7£in. 
x 5in., pp. vi. + 105. Price Is. 6d. net. 

Obit, notice, Wiltshire Gazette, May 8th, 1919. 



Wilts Obituary. 371 

Rev. Charles Holt Wilson, died April 29th, 1919, aged 77. 

Buried at Terrington St. Clements, Norfolk. Lichfield Coll., 1863. 
St. Alban's Hall, Oxford, B.A. 1869, M.A.(Merton Coll.) 1882. Deacon 
1865, priest 1866 (Lichfield). Curate of St. James, Wednesbury 
1865—69 ; Terrington (Norf.), 1869—71 ; Vicar of Upavon, 1871—79 ; 
Vicar of Dilton Marsh, 1879 — 1915, when he resigned and went to live 
in Norfolk. Rural Dean of Heytesbury, 1900 — 12. He was well-known 
in Salisbury diocese and much beloved at Dilton Marsh. During his 
incumbency at Upavon the Church was restored. 

Obit, notices, Wiltshire Times, May 20th, Salisbury Diocesan Gazette. 
June, 1919. 

Rev. Calcraft Neeld Wyld, died March 23rd, 1919, at Salisbury, 
aged 81. Buried at N. Wraxall, where he was born. Educated at 
Harrow and Trin. Coll., Camb. Sarum Theolog. Coll., 1861. Deacon 
1863, priest 1864 (Sarum). Curate of Chilton Foliat, 1863—66; St. 
Martin, Salisbury. 1866—70 ; Vicar of Maiden Bradley, 1872—77 ; 
Curate of Westbury Leigh, 1877 — 79; Rector of St. Martin, Salisbury, 
1879—94 ; Vicar of Burcombe, 1894—1900; Vicar of Grittleton, 1900— 
12, when he resigned and retired to live at Salisbury, serving as acting 
Curate of St. Mark's until his death. During his rectorship of St. 
Martin's the Church was restored, 1885 — 86, the Rectory, the Gigant 
Street Mission Church, and St. Mark's Schools were built, and the 
first part of St. Mark's Church was dedicated in 1894. St. Martin's 
Schools were also improved and restored. Much respected and beloved. 
Obit, notices, Salisbury Journal, March 29th, 1919; Wiltshire 
Gazette, April 3rd, 1919. 

Rev- Edward Tanqueray, died Dec. 18th,1918,aged69. Buried 
at Manningford Bruce. Educated at Marlborough College and Cam- 
bridge. B.A., 1880. Deacon 1880, priest 1881 (Ely). Curate of 
Prickwillow (Cambs.), 1880—82; Gt. Barton, (Suffolk), 1883—86; 
Hitchin, 1886—91 ; Rector of Manningford Bruce, 1892 until his death. 
Obit, notice, Salisbury Diocesan- Gazette, January, 1919. 

ReV. William John Swayne, died suddenly, Dec 17tb, 1918, 
aged 85. Buried at Heytesbury. C.C.C.. Oxon. B.A. 1854, MA. 1857. 
Deacon 1858, priest 1859 (Salisbury). Curate of Downton, 1858—60 ; 
Whiteparish, 1860—74; Vicar of Chitterne, 1874-83; Heytesbury, 
1883 to 1901, when he resigned, retaining the office of Custos of the 
Hungerford Hospital at Heytesbury till 1911. He lived at Compton, 
near Winchester, and Clifton, where he died, after leaving Heytesbury. 
His son, Will. Shuckburgh Swayne, is Dean of Manchester. 
Obit, notice, Wiltshire Gazette, Dec. 19th, 1918. 

Stephen Reynolds, died at Sidmouth, Feb. 14th, 1919, aged 37. 
B. at Devizes, 1881, s. of Frank Reynolds. Educated at private schools 
at Devizes, Bloxham School, and Manchester University. B. Sc. 



372 Wilts Obituary. 

Studied at the Scole des Mines, Paris. In 1903, owing to ill health, 
he went to Sidmouth, where he lodged with the Woolleys, a family of 
fishermen, who nursed him back to health. With them he remained 
as a working partner, sharing in every way their life and work on the 
sea, and gaining the experience which was the foundation of his sub- 
sequent books, through which he became recognised as the chief 
authority on the life of inshore fishermen, 'especially those of the south- 
west, and the most ardent champion of their needs. The Times, in a 
very appreciative obituary notice, Feb. 15th, 1919, says " A man of 
letters, a powerful and original thinker, and above all things a friend 
of inshore fishermen, his books show the terms on which he stood with 
the Devon men with whom he lived, and how completely he had got 
inside their minds and shared their outlook. The brothers Woolley 
are known to all his readers. . . . Whenfhe received in 1913 the 
position under Government of Adviser on Inshore Fisheries to the 
Development Commission, it was recognized that the right man had 
been put into the right place. ... On the outbreak of war the 
movements of fishing vessels had to be much restricted and cooperation 
between the Board of Agriculture'and the Admiralty being necessary, 
Reynolds, who was accredited to the Devonport Command, was enabled, 
by his intimate knowledge of the fisheries, his close touch with the 
fishermen, and his tactful handling of authority, to help the fisheries of 
Devon and Cornwall to the enjoyment, throughout the war, of almost 
unprecedented prosperity . . . Reynolds might be said to have lived 
for the fisheries ; he brought the system of district inspection to a high 
degree of organization ; he maintained the closest touch with every 
fishing port and cove : he was known from end to end of his district 
... it was the fisherman and not the commercial aspect of fisherieswhich 
appealed to him." In a long letter by Mr. Cecil Harms worth in the 
Times Literary Supplement, Feb. 20th, 1919, he says: — "In away 
Stephen Reynolds was one of the most fortunate men I have ever 
known. He set out to perform a certain task and, lamentably brief 
as was his life, he succeeded in accomplishing a great part of it . . . 
he desired above all things to help the class to which he had allied 
himself ; and before he died he laid the foundations of a policy that is 
now being carried out and has already done much for the welfare and 
prosperity of one of the most valuable elements in our community . . . 
I know of few cases where a man of ideas has found the way open so 
quickly and so directly to their acceptance." An appreciation by his 
publisher and friend George A. Macmillan, in The Spectator, March 
22nd, 1919, says : — "The death of such a man just at this moment 
when men with these very qualities are so sorely needed to deal in the 
right spirit with urgent industrial problems is a grave loss to the nation 
at large." 

[The Editor hopes to print a full list of his writings in a later number 
of the Magazine.] 

Obit, notices, Wiltshire Gazette, Feb. 20th, 1919. Art. by Holbrook 
Jackson, in To-Day, March 22nd, 1919. 



Wilts Obituary. 373 

John Cleasbey IiOllgstaff, died January 24th, 1919, aged 50. 
Buried at Holt. For over 23 years Head Master of the Congregational 
School at Holt. He was well known as a Wesleyan Local Preacher 
for many years and took a leading part in all Wesleyan matters. He 
was much valued and respected at Holt. A man of wide reading he 
was especially interested in etymology. 

Long obit, notice, with portrait, Wiltshire Times, Feb. 1, 1919. He 
was the author of 

Notes on Wiltshire Names, by John C. Longstaff, Vol. I. 
Place Names. Bradford on-Avon : Wm. Dotesio, The 
Library Press, 1911, Cloth, 8vo., pp. v. + 3 + 166. 

In this volume it was stated that " Vol. II., Surnames, will be pub- 
lished shortly." Much of the MS. for this second volume was prepared, 
but the sale of Vol. I. was not sufficiently large to warrant the expense 
of printing Vol. II. This was to be regretted for Vol. I. was a very 
useful work, summing up what has been said by various authorities on 
the derivation of Wiltshire Place Names. 

He also printed interesting Notes on Surnames, especially those of 
Holt and Bradford families, in the Wiltshire Times, Nov. 15th, 1913, 
and Feb. 28th, 1914. 

William Stratton, died March 26th, 1919, aged 84. Buried at 
Kingston Deverill. Eldest s. of Richard Stratton of Broad Hinton, 
where he managed his father's farm, afterwards farming on his own 
account at Inglesham, from which he removed to Kingston Deverell, 
where he remained fifty years as one of the best known and most 
prominent Wiltshire agriculturists, leading the way in the fencing of 
the downland, and the laying down of land in the bad times. For over 
twenty years he was chairman of the Cattle Diseases Committee of 
the Central Chamber of Agriculture, and was one of the two tenant 
farmers who were asked to serve on the Duke of Richmond's Royal 
Commission on Agriculture, and took a large part in the framing of 
the report. Of late years he had lived at Warminster. His widow, d. 
of Mr. Thomas Pope, of Horningsham, survives him, as do his sons, 
C. H. Stratton, of London ; Richard, of Kingston Deverill ; and John, 
of Codford. 
Obit, notice, Wiltshire Gazette, April 3rd, 1919. 

FaCOb Usher, died April 21st, 1919, aged 81. Buried at Trowbridge 
Cemetery. Son of Thomas Usher, founder of Usher's Brewery. 
Educated at Bath and joined his father's business, becoming chairman 
when it became a Limited Company in 1889, a position he retained till 
about eight years ago. He was an active member of Trowbridge 
Local Board and afterwards of the Urban Council. He became a 
member of the County Council when it came into existence in 1889 
and only resigned his seat in 1919, and was a member of many 
committees of the Council. J. P. for the County 1907. He was a 
very prominent Wesleyan, the senior Local Preacher, a Sunday School 



374 Additions to Museum and Library. 

teacher for a long while in connection with the Manvers' Street 
Wesleyan Church. He was one of the chief supporters of the Liberal 
cause in Trowbridge. 

Obit, notice and portrait Wiltshire Times, April 26th, 1919. 

Henry Arthur Moriiiiigton Wellesley, 3rd Earl 

COWley, died January 15th, 1919. Buried at Draycot. Born 1866, 
succeeded his father 1895. Served with Imperial Yeomanry in 
S. Africa. Formerly Captain in 3rd Batt. Wilts Regt. He married 
first 1889 Lady Violet Neville, d. of Marquis of Abergavenny, who 
divorced him 1896 ; secondly 1905, Millicent Florence Eleanor, d. of 
1st Baron Nunburnholme, divorced wife of Sir Charles Hartopp. She 
divorced Lord Cowley 1913. He married, thirdly Clare, d. of Sir 
Francis Stapleton, Bart. His successor in the title, Christian Arthur 
Viscount Dangan, the son of the first wife, was born 1890 and married 
May Picard in 1914. He has acted under the name of Arthur 
Wellesley at the Criterion and other theatres. 

Obit, notice, Daily Sketch, with portrait, and Wiltshire Gazette, 
Jan. 16th, 1919. 



ADDITIONS TO MUSEUM AND LIBRARY. 



Museum. 

Presented by the Rev. H. G. O. Kendall : Flint Arrowhead. A series 
of Flints from Avebury Down. 
„ „ Mr. O. G. S. Crawford : Fragment of Ground Flint 

Celt, from Bemerton. 
„ Mr. A. R. White : " La Tene I." fibula from Charnage. 
„ „ Mr. H. W. W t illiams : Iron Hinge of the old Turnpike 

Gate on the Devizes-Potterne Road. 



Library. 

Presented by the Author, Mgr. Count Bickerstaffe Drew (John 
Ayscough) " Fernando," 1918. 
„ „ Messrs.* Sotheby, Wilkinson & Hodge, " The Wilton 

Suits, a Controversy." 4to. 1918. 
„ Mr. O. G. S. Crawford, F.S.A. : Five Drawings of 
Antiquities. 






Additions to Library. 375 

Pesented by Mr. W. H. Butchrr: Murray's " Western Cathedrals." 
List of Voters, N. Wilts, 1841. 

„ ,, The Author (the Rev. J. P. Wiles) : Sermons preached 

at Devizes, complete set. 

„ „ The Author (Mr. A. Schomberg) : " Seend Monu- 

mental Inscriptions." 
„ The Author (Mr. E. H. Macy), of Salisbury, about 50 

leaflet Poems, 1914—1919. 
„ Mr. F. W. Long : " Zion Street Baptist Chapel, Trow- 
bridge, an Historical Account, 1813—1913." 

,, ,, Mr. A. Fraser : Bath and Devizes Almanac, 1836. 

Chippenham" and Wiltshire Almanac, 1836, and 1837. 
Provincial Almanac, especially adapted for Wiltshire, 
1835. 

,, ,, Rev. E. H. Goddard : Salisbury Dio. Gazette for 1918. 

N. Wilts Church Magazine, &c, &c. 

„ „ Mr. A. W. Marks : 8 old documents connected with 

Edington and Tinhead, 1763—1774. One other Wilts 
Deed. 
,, The Author (Mr. F. Stevens) : " Some account of the 
Educational Work done at the Salisbury Museum, 
1916-19." "City of Salisbury Children's Peace 
Festival. Pageant of Salisbury through the Ages, July 
28th, 1919. Book of Words." 

„ „ The Writer (Rev. A. W. Stote, F.S.G.) : "Abstracts 

of Copies of Court Rolls and other Documents relating 
to Bradford Manor." M.S. Small 4to. 

,, „ The Author (Mr. H. St. G. Gray) : Reports of Ave- 

bury Excavations, from 1912 — 1915. 

„ „ The Somerset Arch. Society : Wiltshire Deed. 

„ ,, Mr. J. J. Slade : Several Wiltshire Sale Catalogues, &c. 

„ ,, Mr. H. W. Dartnell : Salisbury Directory. Sale 

Catalogues. 

,, „ Rev. C. V. Goddard: Salisbury Journal, 1918. 

Pamphlets. 

„ ,, Mrs. Wilson : 5 Wiltshire Pamphlets. 



376 



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380 



Any Member whose name or address is incorrectly printed in this List is 
requested to communicate with the Financial Secretary. 

WILTSHIRE 

archaeological attti Natural Sltetorp Society. 



JUNE, 1919. 



Patron : 
The Most Hon. The Marquis of Lansuowne, K.G. 

President : 
W. Hewaed Bell, Esq., F.G.S., F.S.A. 

Vice-Presidents : 

The Most Hon. the Marquis of I The Right Rev. Bishop G; Forrest 
Bath I Browne, F.S.A. 



Trustees 



The Most Hon. The Marquis of 

Lansdowne, K.G. 
The Most Hon. The Marquis of 

Bath 



The Right Hon. Lord Roundway 
W.HewardBell,Esq.,F.G.S.,F.S.A. 
G. P. Fuller, Esq. 



The Committee consists of the folloiving Members, in addition to the 
Honorary Officers of the 

Ven. Archdeacon Bodington, The 

Vicarage, Calne 
J. I. Bowes, Esq., Devizes 
Mrs. B. H. Cunnington, Devizes 
O. G. S. Crawford, Esq., Tan 

House, Donning ton, Newbury. 
Rev. E. P. Knubley, Steeple Ashton 

Vicarage, Trowbridge 



A. D. Passmore, Esq., Wood St 

Swindon. 
C. E. Ponting, Esq., " Eglinton,' 

Upper Park stone, Dorset, 
E. H. Stone, Esq , Devizes 
Rev. A. W. Stote,Colehill Vicarage 

Wimborne. \_Devize 

G. S. A. Waylen, Esq , Long St. 



Hon. General Secretary and Librarian : 
Rev. E. H. Goddard, Clyffe Pypard Vicarage, Swindon 

Honorary Curator of the Museum, and Meeting Secretary 
B. H. Cunnington, Esq., F.S.A., Scot., Devizes 

Deputy Honorary Curator, Nat. Hist. : 



List of Members. 381 

Honorary Local Secretaries: 



A. W. N. Burder, Esq., F.S.A., 

R. S. Ferguson, Esq., Elm Grove, 
Calne 

Rev. C. V. Goddard, Baverstock, 
Salisbury 

John D. Crosfield, Esq., Durley 
House, Savernake Forest, Marl- 
borough [ Cor sham 

F. H. Goldney, Esq., Beechfeld, 



Rev. Canon F. H. Manley, Great 

Somerford, Chippenham 
Rev. J. Penrose, West Ashton, 

Trowbridge 
Arthur Sehonrberg, Esq., Seend, 

Melksham 
Frank Stevens, Esq., F.S.A., 

Salisbury 



Hon. Treasurer : 
The Right Hon. Lord Roundway, Roundway Park, Devizes 

Honorary Auditors : 

G. S. A. Waylen, Esq., Devizes 

E. F. Toone, Esq., Devizes 

Financial Secretary : 
Mr. David Owen, F.C.A., Bank Chambers, Devizes. 



List of Societies <fec., in Union with the 
Wiltshire Archaeological and Natural History Society 

For interchange of Publications, Sfc. 

Society of Antiquaries of London 

Royal Archaeological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland 

British Archaeological Association 

Society of Antiquaries of Scotland 

Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland 

Kent Archaeological Society 

Somerset Archaeological Society 

Essex b'ield Club 

Hampshire Field Club 

Bristol and Gloucestershire Archaeological Society 

Herts Natural History Society and Field Club 

Powysland Club 

East Riding Antiquarian Society, Yorks 

East Herts Archaeological Society 

Ootteswold Naturalists' Field Club 

United States Geological Survey 

Bureau of Ethnology, Washington, D.C., United States 

Dorset Natural History and Antiquarian Field Club 

Surrey Archaeological Society 

Society of Antiquaries of Newcastle-on-Tyne 

Lancashire and Cheshire Antiquarian Society 



382 



List of Members. 



LIST OF MEMBERS. 

Life Members: 



Antrobus, Lady 

Crewe, Right Hon. Earl of, Crewe 

Hall, Cheshire 
Fitzmaurice, ! The Right Hon. Lord, 

Leigh, Bradford-on-Avon 
Lansdo wne, Most Hon. Marquis of, 

K.G., Bowood, Calne 
Ludlow, JamesiB., iFlemings Hotel, 

9, Half Moon Street, Mayfair, 

London, W. 



Penruddocke, C, Compton Park, 
Salisbury 

Radnor, Right Hon. Earl of, Long- 
ford Castle, Salisbury 

Stancomb, John F., Shaw House, 
Melksham 

Walmesley, John, Lucknam, Chip- 
penham 

Wordsworth, Rev. Canon, St. 
Nicholas' Hospital, Salisbury 



Annual Subscribers 



a Court,Captain the Hon. Holmes, 
R.N., Bishopstrow, Warminster 

Adderley Library, Librarian of, 
The College, M arlborough 

Adye, Mrs. W. J. A.,St. Margaret's, 
Bradford-on-Avon 

Antrobus, Sir Cosmo, Bart., Ames- 
bury Abbey, Salisbury 

Arkell, Mrs, Redlands Court, 
Highworth 

Armin, F. G. H., 17, Market 
Place, Devizes 

Avebury, The Right Hon.Lord, 15, 
Lombard Street, London, E.C. 

Awdry, Justly W., The Paddocks. 
Chippenham [bury 

Aylward, Percy D., Wilton, Salis- 

Baker, Miss F. E., 91, Brown 

Street, Salisbury 
Baker-Stallard-Penoyre, Mrs., 

a Becketts House, Tinhead, 

Westbury 
Barclay, Rev. D. B., The Vicarage, 

Braintree, Essex 
Barrett, W. H., 76, Marshfield 

Road, Chippenham 
Bath Corporation Library, Bath 
Bath, The Most Hon. the Marquis 

of, Longleat, Warminster 
Beaven, Edwin C, "Arboyne," 

Holt, Trowbridge 
Bell, Lt.-Col. W. C. Heward, 

R.F.A., M.P., Junior Carlton 

Club, London 
Bell, W. Heward, F.G.S., F.SA., 

Cleeve House, Seend,'Melksham 



Benett-Stanford, Major Vere, 

Hatch House, Tisbury, Wilts 
Bethel], 8., 12, Hughenden Road, 

Clifton, Bristol 
Bird, W. R., 125, Goddard Avenue, 

Swindon 
Birmingham Free Libraries, Rat- 

cliffe Place, Birmingham 
Blackmore, Dr. H. P., Vale House, 

Salisbury 
Blackwell, Miss A. E , Emmeline 

House, Rodbourne Cheney, 

Swindon 
Bodington, Ven. Archdeacon, The 

Vicarage, Calne 
Bourne, Rev.CanonG. H., D.C.L., 

St. Edmund's College, Salisbury 
Bouverie, E.O.P., F.S.A., The Old 

House, Market Lavington, Wilts 
Bouverie, Miss A. Pleydell.TheOld 

House, Market Lavington 
Bowes, J. I., Devizes 
Bowes, W. H. B., Isebrook Lodge, 

Wellingborough, Northants 
Bradford, Miss M. M.,St.Amands, 

Adderbury, Banbury, Oxon 
Briggs, Admiral Sir C. J., K.C.B., 

Biddestone, Chippenham 
Bristol Municipal Public Libraries, 

(E. R. Norris Mathews, F.R. 

Hist. Soc, City Librarian, Cen- 
tral Library, Bristol) 
Brocklebank, Rev. J. W. R., Long- 
bridge Deverill, Warminster 
Brooke, J. W.,Rosslyn, Marlborough 
Brown, Rev. P. R. B., Wilton, 
Salisbury 



List of Members. 



383 



Buchanan, Ven. Archdeacon, 38, 

The Close, Salisbury 
Buller, Mrs. Tremayne, Downes, 

Crediton, Devon 
Burder, Alfred W. N. 
Burgess, Rev. C. F., Wanborough, 

Swindon 
Burt, W. H., The Red House, 

Lacock, Chippenham 
Bush, Robert C, 1, Winifred's 

Dale, Cavendish Road, Bath 
Buxton, Gerald J., Tockenham 

Manor, Swindon 



Caillard, Sir Vincent H. P., Wing- 
field House, Trowbridge 
Calne Public Library, Calne 
Canning, Lt.-Col. A., Restrop 

House, Purton, Wilts 
Canner, Rev. J. T., Chitterne 

Vicarage, Codford, Wilts 
Carter, C. C, The College, Marl- 
borough 
Cattarns, R., Great Somerford, 

Chippenham 
drivers, Giles, St. John Street, 

Devizes 
Chubb, Sir C. H. E., Bart., Bemer- 

ton Lodge, Salisbury 
Clifton, the Right Rev. The Lord 

Bishop of, St. Ambrose, Leigh 

Woods, Bristol 
Clark-Maxwell, Rev. Preb. W. G., 

St.Leonard'sRectory,Bridgnorth 
Clark, Miss M., Prospect House, 

Devizes 
Clarke, The Rev. A. H. T., The 

Rectory, Devizes 
Clapham, Capt. J. T., 3, Homefield 

Road, Wimbledon Common, 

London, S.W. 19 
Cole, Clem, Calne, Wilts 
Cole, Dr. S. J., Campfield, Devizes 
Cook, A., Aldcot, Pewsey, Wilts 
Cooke, W. L., Keevil, Trowbridge 
Cooke, Mrs., Keevil, Trowbridge 
Colville, H. H., The Lodge, Hil- 

marton, Calne 
, Coward,Edward,SouthgateHouse, 

Devizes 
| Coward, Mrs., Southgate House, 

Devizes 
Cox,E. Richardson, South Wraxall 

Manor, Bradford-on-Avon 



Crawford, O. G. S., F.S.A., Tan 

House, Donnington, Newbury 
Crosfield, John D.,Durley House, 

Savernake Forest, Marlborough 
Cunnington, B. H., F.S.A., (Scot.), 

Devizes 
Cunnington, Mrs. B. H., 33, Long 

Street, Devizes 
Curtis, MissE. J., Havering House, 

Milton, Pewsey 



d'Almaine, *JJ. G. W., Abingdon, 

Berks 
Dartnell, H. W.,Abbotsfield,Salis- 

bury 
Davys, Rev. S. D. M., Urchfont 

Vicarage, Devizes 
Dickins, Mrs., Woodville, Potterne 

Road, Devizes 
Dismorr, H. B., M.D., Wroughton, 

Swindon 
Dixon, S. B., Pewsey 
Dunne, A. M., The Highlands, Calne 
Dunsterville, Col. K. S., 



Edwards, W. C, 3, Victoria Road, 

Clapham Common, London, 

S.W. 4 
Engleheart, Rev. G. H., F.S.A., 

Dinton, Salisbury 
Everett, C. R., The Hawthorns, 

Market Lavington, Wilts 
Eyre, G. E. Briscoe, Warrens, 

Bramshaw, near Lyndhurst, 

Hants 



Farrer, Percy, F.S.A., Westfield, 

Mullen's Pond, Andover, Hants 
Fass, F. G., Broughton Gifford, 

Melksham 
Ferguson, R. S., M.B, CM, Elm 

Grove, Calne 
Fernie, Mrs., Keythorpe Hall, 

Leicester 
Finlay,The Hon. William, Fairway, 

Great Bedwyn, Hungerford 
Firman, Rev. S, Cherhill Rectory, 

Calne 
Flower, C. I, 2, Lammas Park 

Gardens, Ealing, London, W. 6 



384 



List of Members. 



Fraser, J. Alex., Northcliffe, Tet- 

bury Road, Malmesbury 
Fry, E. A., Thornhill, Kenley, 

Surrey 
Fuller, G. P., Neston Park, 

Corsham 
Fuller, R. F., Greats Chalfield, 

Melksham 

Gardner, E. C, Lloyds' Bank, Ltd. 

(Capital & Counties Branch), 

Devizes 
Garnett, C, Great House, Chip- 
penham 
George, Reuben, 132, Goddard 

Avenue, Swindon 
Gilbert, A. John, High Street, 

Swindon 
Gladstone, John E., Bowden Park, 

Chippenham 
Glanfield, Rev. Edgar, Imber 

Vicarage, Warminster 
Glenconner, The Rt. Hon. Lord, 

Wilsford House, Salisbury 
Goddard, Rev. C. V., Baverstock, 

Salisbury 
Goddard,Rev. E. H.,ClyffePypard 

Vicarage, Swindon 
Goddard,Mrs E. H., Clyffe Pypard 

Vicarage. Swindon 
Goddard, F. Pleydell, The Lawn, 

Swindon 
Goldney, F. H., Beechfield, Cor- 
sham, Wilts 
Goldney, Sir John T., Monk's Park, 

Corsham 
Goldney, Sir Prior, Bart, Derriads, 

Chippenham 
Goldsbrough, Rev. Albert, Burley- 

in-Wharfedale, Leeds 
Goodchild, Rev. W., Berwick St. 

John Rectory, Salisbury 
Gore, C. H., F.G.S., 69, Eastcott 

Hill, Swindon 
Gough, W., Nore Marsh, Wootton 

Bassett 
Greenstreet, Rev. L. W., Compton 

Bassett Rectory, Calne 
Greville, The Hon. Louis, Heale 

House, Woodford, Salisbury 
Grose, Samuel, M.D., Teign View, 

Bishops Teignton, near Teign- 

mouth, S. Devon 
Gundry, R. S., C.B., Hillworth 

Cottage, Devizes 
Gwatkin, R. G-, Manor House, 

Potterne, Devizes, Wilts 



Gwillim, E. LI., Marlborough 
G.W.R. Mechanics' Institution, 
Swindon 



Hansard, J. H., Stanbridge Earls, 

Romsey, Hants 
Harring, R. M., 22, lioundstone 

Street, Trowbridge 
Harris, Rev. C, Garsdon Rectory, 

Malmesbury 
Harrison, Rev. A. H., Lydiard 

Tregoze Rectory, Swindon 
Harrison, Rev. D. P., Lydiard 

Millicent Rectory, Swindon 
Harrison, Rev. R. B., Purton, 

Swindon 
Hawley, Lt.-Col. W., R.E., F.S.A., 

Stockton House, Codford St. 

Mary, Wilts 
Herbert, Major the Hon. George, 

Knoyle House, Salisbury 
Hewlett, Maurice, Old Rectory, 

Broad Chalke, Salisbury 
Heytesbury, Col. Lord, Devizes 
Hoare, Sir Henry H. A., Bart., 

Stourhead, Bath 
Hobhouse, Rt. Hon. Sir C. E. H., 

Bart., Monkton Farleigh, Brad- 

ford-on-Avon 
Hony, G. B., 4, Beaufort Road, 

Clifton, Bristol 
Hope, Lady St. John, Gale wood, 

Gt. Shelford, Cambridge 
Hornby, C. H. St J., Porch House, 

Potterne, Devizes, Wilts 
Hoste,Rev. C. Dixon, The Rectory, 

Marlborough 
Howlden, H. Linley, Old Manor 

House, Freshford, Somerset 



Impey, Edward, The Manor, 
Steeple Ashton, Trowbridge 

Islington, The Rt. Hon. Lord, 
Hartham Park, Corsham 



Jackson, J. T., Devizes 

Jenner, Major L. C. D., The Manor 
House, Avebury, Marlborough 

John Rylands Library, Manchester 

Johnstone, J. J. Hope, Raehills, 
Lockerbie, Scotland 

Jones, F. Meyrick, Home Place, 
Holt, Norfolk 

Johnson, Rev. Beaumont, Sedge- 
hill Vicarage, Shaftesbury 



List of Members. 



385 



Keir, W*. Ingram, F.R.C.S.E.,The 
Limes, Melksham 

Ketchley, Rev. H. E., Biddestone 
Rectory, Chippenham 

Knubley, Rev. Canon E. P., The 
Vicarage, Steeple Ashton, Trow- 
bridge 



Lambert, R., C, 100, Abbey Road 
Mansions, St. John's Wood, 
London, N.W. 

Lansdown, C. M., Glenbeigh, 
Westbourne Road, Trowbridge 

Laverton, W. H., Leighton, West- 
bury 

Lawrence, W. F., Cowesfield, 
Salisbury 

Lawes, E. Thornton H., Ennox 
Lodge, Hinton Charterhouse, 
Bath 

Leaf, Mrs. Herbert, The Green, 
Marlborough 

Lethbridge, Rev. H. C.B., South- 
broom Vicarage, Devizes 

Locket, J. Wood, Inglewood, 
Melksham 

Long, Col. W., Newton House, 
Clevedon 

Long, Frederick W., " Rosslyn," 
Clarendon, Trowbridge 

Long, Rt. Hon. W. FL, M.P., Rood 
Ashton, Trowbridge 

Lucas, J., Preston House, War- 
minster 



Main, Geo. J., The Priory, Brown 
Street, Salisbury 

Mann, W. J., Trowbridge 

Manley, Rev. Canon F. H , Somer- 
ford Magna Rectory, Chippen- 
ham 

Marcon, Mrs., Home Close, High- 
clere, Newbury 

Marlborough College Natural His- 
tory Society, President of, The 
College, Marlborough 

Mnskelyne, A. St. J. Story, Public 
Record Office, Chancery Lane, 
London 

Maskelyne, Mrs. Story, Basset 
Down, Wroughton, Wilts 

Masters, W. A. H , 42, Cricklade 
Street, Swindon 



Matcham, G. Eyre, Newhouse, 

Salisbury 
Maton, Eustace B., Coombe, En- 
ford, Pewsey 
Maton, Fred, Stephen, High Trees, 

Clapham Common, London, 

S.W. 4 
M aton, Leonard , 1 , Sundial House, 

Kensington, W. 8 
McNiven, C. F., Puckshipton, 

Pewsey 
Medlicott, Walter B., 18, Campden 

Hill Gardens, London, W. 8 
Merriman, R, W., Sempringham, 

Marlborough 
Messenger, H., The Close Gate- 
house, Salisbury 
Methuen, Field Marshal Lord, 

Corsham Court, Corsham 
Milling, Rev. M. J. T., The Vicar- 
age, Ashton Keynes, Cricklade 
Miles, Miss C. F., 59, Egerton 

Gardens, London, S. W. 
Milman, Miss, Brownston House, 

Devizes 
Mitchell, Miss E. C, The Square, 

Wilton, Salisbury 
Moore, W. Vincent Jun., West 

Street, Wilton 
Morrin, Rev. T., St. Aldhelm's, 

Malmesbury 
Morrison, Hugh, M.P., Fonthill 

House, Fonthill Gifford, Tis- 

bury, Wilts. 
Morse, W. E., 34, Regent Circus, 

Swindon 
Moulton, John, The Hall, Brad- 

ford-on-Avon . 
Mundy, H., Trowbridge 
Murray-Shirreff, Mrs. A., Whitley 

Brow, Melksham 
Myers, Rev. Canon, The Close, 

Salisbury 



Naish, Miss R. V., Wilton, Salis- 
bury 

National Library of Wales, Aber- 
ystwyth 

Neale, John Alex., D.C.L., 42, 
Half Moon Street, Piccadilly, 
London 

Neeld, Lieut.-Col Sir Audley D., 
Bart., C.B., Grittleton House, 
Chippenham 



386 



List of Member, 



Nelson, The Rt. Hon. Earl, Trafal- 
gar, (Salisbury 
Newall, R. S., Fisherton Delamere 

House, Wylye, Wilts 
Newberry Library,Cbicago, U.S.A. 

per Messrs. B. F. Stevens & 

Brown, 4, Trafalgar Square, W.C. 
Newbolt, Sir H. J., Netherhamp- 

ton House, Salisbury 
NewEnglandHistoric Genealogical 

Society, 9, Ashburton Place, 

Boston, Mass., U.S.A. 
New York Public Library, per 

Messrs. B. F. Stevens & Brown, 

4,TrafalgarSquare,London,W.C. 
Noel, Rev. Wyndham,Christchurch 

Vicarage, Bradford -on- A von 
Normanton, Rt. Hon. Earl of, 

Somerley, Ringwood, Hants 
Norwood, Cyril, D. Lit., D.C.L., 

The College, Marlborough 
Noyes, Miss Ella, Sutton Veny, 

Warminster 



Olivier, Col. H. D., c/o Messrs. 
Grindlay & Co., 54, Parliament 
Street, London, S.W. 

Owen, D., Richmond House, Wes- 
ton Park, Bath 

Oxford Architectural & Historical 
Society, Ashmolean Museum, 
Beaumont Street, Oxford 

Oxley, Selwyn, 75, Victoria Road, 
London, W. 



Palmer, George, LI., M,P., Lack 

ham, Lacock, Wilts 
Parsons, R., Hunt's Mill Farm, 

Wootton Bassett 
Passmore, A. D., Wood Street, 

Swindon 
Peake, H. J. E., Westbrook House, 

Newbury 
Penrose, Dr. F. G., Rathleate, 51, 

Surrey Road, Bournemouth 
Penrose, Rev. J.. West Ashton 

Vicarage, Trowbridge 
Perkins, Rev. Charles, E., Little 

Hinton Rectory, Swindon 
Peto, H. A., Iford Manor, Brad- 

ford-on-Avon 
Philipps, Bertram, Dinton House, 

Salisbury 
Pile, T. A. J., 15, Holland Villas 

Road, Kensington, W. 



Ponting, C. E , F.S.A., "Eglinton," 
Upper Parkstone, Dorset 

Powell, John U., Boreham, War- 
minster 

Preston, W. R., M.P., Rowdeford, 
Devizes 

Pritchard, J. E., F.S.A., .22, St, 
John Road, Clifton, Bristol 

Prower, Miss, Sissells, Purton, 
Wilts 

Public Record Office, Chancery 
Lane, London, per Superin- 
tendent of Publications Book 
Depot, H.M. Stationery Office, 
Prince's Street, Westminster, 
W. 1. 

Pye-Smith, E.F., The Close, Salis- 
bury 



Radcliffe, His Honour Judge,K.C, 
The Rise, Headington Hill, Ox- 
ford 

Rankin, E. C, Lushill, Highworth, 
Wilts 

Bawlence, E. A., Newlands, Salis- 
bury 

Redfern, Rev. J. Lemon, Ashley 
Rectory, Tetbury, Gloucester- 
shire 

Rendell,Ethelbert, St. John Street, 
Devizes 

Reynolds, Major, Wolf hall Manor, 
Burbage, Marlborough 

Richardson, A. P., Purton House, 
Purton, Wilts 

Richardson, Rev. A. T., Bradford- 
on-Avon 

Richardson, Mrs. H., Red House, 
Wilton, Salisbury 

Robbins, Rev. M., Holy Trinity 
Vicarage, West End, Chobham 

Roemer, Major de, Lime Park, 
Hurstmonceux, Sussex 

Rogers, Mrs. R., Advertiser Office, 
Devizes 

Ross, Rev. Canon A. G. Gordon, 
St. Mark's Vicarage, Swindon 

Roundway, Lord, Roundway Park, 
Devizes 

Rudman, Pvobert E. D., Chippen- 
ham 

Rumboll, C. F., M.D., Lowbourne 
House, Melksham. 



Lint of Members. 



387 



Sadler, John, 10, Woodville Road, 
Ealing, London, VV. 5 

Sainsbury, Herbert, Greystone 
House, Devizes 

Sainsbury,Mrs.Herbert,Greystone 
House, Devizes 

Salisbury Public Library, Endless 
Street, Salisbury 

Salisbury, The Very Rev, The 
Dean of, The Deanery, Salisbury 

Salisbury Clerical Library, Church 
House, Salisbury 

Scarth, Leveson, Turleigh Mill, 
Bradford-on-Avon 

Schomberg, Arthur, Seend, M elk- 
sham 

Schomberg, E. C, Seend, M elk- 
sham 

Scott, H. Dudley, Erchfont Manor, 
Devizes 

Selman, Jacob, Kington Langley, 
Chippenham 

Sibbald, J. G. E., Mount Pleasant, 

- Norton St. Philip, Bath 

Simpson, Cecil, Clifton ville, The 
Common, Sutton, Surrey 

Simpson, George, Market Place, 
Devizes 

Simpson', J. J., Osborne House, 
Cotham Park, Bristol 

Simpson. A. B., Upper Lodge, 
Fernhurst, Haslemere, Surrey 

Slade, J.J., Gazette Office, Devizes 

Sladen, Rev. C. A., Alton Berners, 
Pewsey 

Slow, Edward, Wilton, Wilts ' 

Snailum, W. W, Wingfield Road, 
Trowbridge 

Soames, Rev. Gordon, Mildenhall 
Rectory, Marlborough 

Soul, John, Amesbury, Wilts 

Spicer, Capt. J. E. P., Spye Park, 
Chippenham 

Steele, Lt.-Col., R.A.M.C, South- 
gate Lodge, Devizes 

Stephens, Rev. Canon J. F. D., 
The Vicarage, Highworth, Swin- 
don 
■ Stevens, Frank, F.S.A.,Blackmore 

Museum, Salisbury 
I Stewart, Rev. G. W., 3, Market 

Hill, Calne 
' Stone, W. J. E. Warry, 72, Elm 

Park Gardens, London, S.W. 
; Stone, E. H., The Retreat, Potterne 

Road, Devizes 
\ Stote, Rev. A. W., ColehillVicarage, 

I Wimborne 



Stratton, Alfred, Melksham 
Sturton, Rev. J. A., Market 

Lavington Vicarage, Devizes 
Sykes, Rev. W. S ., 47, Beresford 

Road, Birkenhead 



Talbot, Miss M., Lacock Abbey, 

Chippenham 
Tatum, Edward J., Solicitor, 

Salisbury 
Tayler, Mrs. M. C, The Abbey 

House, Bradford-on-Avon 
Taylor, V. T., Steinbrook House, 

Kington Langley, Chippenham 
Thonger, Charles E. TV, Fy field 

Manor, Pewsey 
Thornely, Thomas Heath, The 

Elms, Nursteed, Devizes 
Tidy, Rev. Gordon, Ditteridge, 

Box, Wilts 
Timbrel], J. Neate, M.H.S. Ac- 
countants, A.P.Q.4, France 
Toone, E. F., Lloyds' Bank, Ltd., 

(Capital'and Counties Branch), 

Devizes 
Trenchard, J. Ashfordby, Stanton 

Fifz warren, Highworth, Wilts 
Tupholme, Rev. W. S., Steeple 

Langford Rectory, Salisbury 



Usher, T. C, Sunny Croft, Trow- 
bridge 



Viney, Herbert, Maplecroft, Melk- 
sham 



Walrond, R.D., Aldbourne, Bram- 

coate Road, Putney, London, 

S.W. 
Walsh, Arthur H., The Manor 

House, Purton, Wilts 
Wallis, The Right |Rev. Bishop, 

Salisbury 
Walters, L. D'O.. 12a, Evelyn 

Mansions, London, S.W. 1. 
Ward, J. E., Red Lodge, Purton, 

Wilts 
Warrender, Miss, Stoke House, 

Purton, Wilts 
Warrington, The Rt. Hon. Lord 

Justice, Clyffe Hall, Market 

Lavington, Devizes. 



388 



List of Members. 



Watson-Taylor, John, Wellington 

Club, Grosvenor Place, London, 

S.W. 1 
Watson-Taylor, G., ErlestokePark, 

Devizes 
Watson, Rev. A. J., Savernake 

Vicarage, Marlborough 
Waylen, G. S. A., Devizes 
Waylen, R. F., Devizes 
Weallens, Rev. R. S.., Berwick 

Bassett Vicarage, Swindon 
Webb, W. A., 83, Argyle Road, 

West Ealing, London, W. 13 
Weight, Rev. Canon T. J., Christian 

Malford Rectory, Chippenham 
Wells, Charles, F.J.I., 134, Crom 

well Road, Bristol 
Whatton,Hugh de,Rockley Manor, 

Marlborough 
White, G. A. H., The Hawthorns, 

Chippenham 
Whitney, E., Meadow Bank, Melk- 

sham 
Wilks, Miss M. A. E., Arben 

Cottage, Chertsey 
Wills, John H., Potticks House, 

Frankleigh, Bradford-on-Avon 



Wills, E. S., Ramsbury Manor, 

Hungerford 
Wilson, Vice-Admiral W., Clyffe 

Manor, Swindon 
Winters, Miss, Bookseller, &c, 

West Street, Wilton, Salisbury 
Wood, J. Crewe, The Bungalow, 

Swindon 
Woods, J. C, Lloyds' Bank, Ltd. 

(Capital and Counties Branch), 

Trowbridge 
Woodward, C. H., Exchange Build- 
ings, Station Road, Devizes 
Wrangham, Rev.F.,LongNewnton 

Rectory, Tetbury, Glos. 
Wyld, Rev. Canon Edwin G. 

Vicarage, Melksham 



Yale University Library, New 
Haven, Conn., U.S.A., per E. G. 
Allen & Son, Ltd., 12 and 14, 
Grape Street, Shaftesbury 
Avenue, W.C. 

Young, E. H., Lockeridge, Marl- 
borough 




h\2.8DCT 



m 



C. H. Woodward, Printer and Publisher, Exchange Buildings, Station Road, Devizes. 



THE SOCIETY'S PUBLICATIONS (Continued). 

STONEHENGE AND ITS BARROWS, by W. Long, Nos. 46-47 of the 
Magazine in separate wrapper, 7s. 6d. This still remains the best and most 
reliable account of Stonehenge and its Earthworks. 

WILTSHIRE— The TOPOGRAPHICAL COLLECTIONS OF JOHN 
AUBREY, F.R.S., A.D. 1659-1670. • Corrected and enlarged by the Rev. 
Canon J. E. Jackson, M.A., F.S.A. 4to, Cloth, pp. 491, with 46 plates. 
Price £2 10s. 

WILTSHIRE INQUISITIONES POST MORTEM. CHARLES I. 8vo, 
pp. vii. -f 501. 1901. With full index. In 8 parts, as issued. Price 13s. 

DITTO. IN THE REIGNS OF HEN. III., ED. I., and ED. II. 8vo. 
pp. xv., 505. In parts as issued. Price 13s. 

DITTO. FROM THE REIGN OF ED. III. 8vo., pp. 402. In six 
parts as issued. Price 13s. 

A BIBLIOGRAPHY or the GREAT STONE MONUMENTS of 
WILTSHIRE, STONEHENGE and AYEBURY, with other references, 
by W. Jerome Harrison, F.G.S., pp. 169, with 4 illustrations, No. 89, Dec, 
1901, of the Magazine. Price 5s. 6d. Contains particulars as to 947 books, 
papers, &c, by 732 authors, 

THE TROPENELL CARTULARY. An important work in '2 vols., 8vo, 
pp. 927, containing a great number of deeds connected with property in many 
Wiltshire Parishes of the 14th and 15th centuries. Only 150 copies were 
printed, of which a few are left. Price to members, £1 10s., and to non- 
members, £2. 

WILTSHIRE MAMMALS, BIRDS, & REPTILES. 

Mil. G-. B. Hony, 4, Beaufort Road, Clifton, Bristol, will be 
greatly obliged if members would kindly send him notice of 
the occurrence of any rare birds within the borders of the 
County, or of the occurrence of unusual mammals or reptiles. 



WANTED, Part 5 " Roman Era " of Hoare's " Ancient Wiltshire." 
Report with price to A. D. Passmore, Wood Street, Swindon. 

BOOKBINDING. 

Books carefully Bound to pattern. 

This department now greatly enlarged. 

Wilts Archaeological Magazine bound to match previous volumes. 

We have several back numbers to make up sets. 

C. H. WOODWARD, Printer and Publisher, 

Exchange Buildings, Station Road, Devizes. 



THE 

North Wilts Museum and 
LIBRARY AT DEVIZES. 



In answer to the appeal made in 1905, annual subscriptions 
varying from £2 to 5s., to the amount of about £30 a year for this 
purpose have been given since then by about sixty Members of 
the Society and the fund thus set on foot has enabled the 
Committee to add much to the efficiency of the Library and 
Museum. 

It is very desirable that this fund should be raised to at least 
£50. a year, in order that the General Fund of the Society may 
be released to a large extent from the cost of the Museum, and 
set free for the other purposes of the Society. 

Subscriptions of 5s. a year, or upwards, are asked for, and 
should be sent either to Mk. D. Owen, Bank Chambers, Devizes, 
or Eev. E. H. Goddard, Clyffe Vicarage, Swindon. 

The Committee appeal to Members of the Society and others 
to secure any 

Objects of Antiquity, 

AND 

Specimens of unusual Birds, 
Butterflies, or Moths, 

found in the County of Wilts and to forward them to the 
Hon. Curator, Mil. B. H. Cunnington, Devizes; 

Whilst Old Deeds, Modern Pamphlets, Articles, 

Portraits, Illustrations from recent Magazines 

or Papers bearing in any way on the County, 

and Sale Particulars of Wiltshire Properties, 

will be most gratefully received for the Library by the Rev. 
E. H. Goddard, Clyffe Vicarage, Swindon, Hon. Librarian. 

0. H. WOODWARD, MACHINE PRINTER, DEVIZES. 



fl 



,,. ; . .•;-;:- 



— 



®i 



No. cxxxr. 



DECEMBER, 1919. 



Vol. XL. 



THE 



WILTSHIRE 

Archaeological & Natural History 

MAGAZINE, 

Published under the Direction of the 

SOCIETY F'OKMED IN THAT COUNTY, 

A. D. 1853. 



EDITED BY 

REV. E. H. GODDARD, Clyffe Vicarage, Swindon. 



[The authors of the papers printed in this " Magazine'' are alone responsible for all 
statements made therein.] 




DEVIZES : 

Printed and sold for the Society by C. H. Woodward, 

Exchange Buildings, Station Road. 



Price 5s. 6d. Members, Gratis. 



NOTICE TO MEMBEES. 
TAKE NOTICE, that a copious Index for the preceding eight 
volumes of the Magazine will be found at the end of Vols, 
viii., xvi., xxiv., and xxxii. The subsequent Volumes are 
each indexed separately. 

Members who have not paid their Subscriptions to the Society for 
the current year, are requested to remit the same forthwith to 
the Financial Secretary, Mr. David Owen, Bank Chambers, 
Devizes, to whom also all communications as to the supply 
of Magazines should he addressed. 

The Annual Subscript-ion to the Society is 10/6, with an entrance 
fee of 10/6. The Composition for Life Membership is £10 10s. 

The Numbers of this Magazine will be delivered gratis, as issued, 
to Members who are not in arrear of their Annual Subscrip- 
tions, but in accordance witli Byelaw No. 8 "The Financial 
Secretary shall give notice to Members in arrear, and the 
Society's publications will not be forwarded to Members whose 
Subscriptions shall remain unpaid after such notice." 

All other communications to be addressed to the Honorary Secre- 
tary : the Rev. E. H. Goddaiid, Clyffe Vicarage, Swindon, 

THE SOCIETY'S PUBLICATIONS 

To be obtained of Mr. D. OWEN", Bank Chambers, Devizes. 

THE BRITISH AND ROMAN ANTIQUITIES OF THE NORTH 
WILTSHIRE DOWNS, by the Rev. A. C. Smith, M.A, One Volume, Atlas 
4to, 248 pp., 17 large Maps, and 110 Woodcuts, Extra Cloth. Price £2 2s. 
One copy offered to each Member of the Society at £1 lis. 6d. 

THE FLOWERING PLANTS OF WILTSHIRE. One Volume, 8vo, 
504 pp., with Map, Cloth. By the Rev, T. A. Preston, M.A. Price to the 
Public, 1 6s. ; but one copy offered to every Member of the Society at half-price. 

CATALOGUE of the STOURHEAD COLLECTION of ANTIQUITIES 
in the SOCIETY'S MUSEUM, with 175 Illustrations. Part I. Price Is. 6d. 

CATALOGUE of ANTIQUITIES in the SOCIETY'S MUSEUM. 
Part II. 1911. Fully illustrated. Price 2s, 

CATALOGUE of the SOCIETY'S LIBRARY at the MUSEUM, 
Price Is. APPENDIX No. I., II., and III., 3d. each. 

CATALOGUE of DRAWINGS, PRINTS, and Maps, in the SOCIETY'S 
LIBRARY at this MUSEUM. Price Is. 6d. 

CATALOGUE of WILTSHIRE TRADE TOKENS in the SOCIETY'S 
COLLECTION. Price 6d. 

BACK NUMBERS of the MAGAZINE. Price to the Public, 5s. 6d. and 
3s. 6d. (except in the case of a few numbers, the price of which is raised). 
Members are allowed a reduction of 25 per cent, from these prices. 



WILTSHIRE 
Archaeological & Natural History 

MAGAZINE. 



No. CXXXI. DECEMBER 1919. A^ol. XL. 



Contents, 



PAGE. 



The Sixty-Sixth General Meeting at Devizes 389—391 

The Church Survey in Wilts, 1649—50: [Parliamentary 
Surveys (Lambeth) Vol. XIV., &c] Communicated by the 

Ven. Archdeacon E. J. Bodington (continued) .. 392—416 

The Early Norman Castle at Devizes : By E. Herbert 

Stone 417—429 

Wilts Obituary , 430 — 432 

Wiltshire Books, Pamphlets, and Articles 433—445 

Wiltshire Portraits 446 — 451 

Wiltshire Illustrations 451—453 

Additions to the Museum and Library 453 — 454 

Index to Vol. XL 455—522 



Devizes:— C. H. Woodward, Exchange Buildings, Station Road. 






THE 



WILTSHIRE MAGAZINE. 



" MULTORtJM MANlBUJi GRANDE LEVATUR ONUS." Ovid. 

No. CXXXI. December, 1919. Vol. XL. 

THE SIXTY-SIXTH GENERAL MEETING 

OF 

THE WILTSHIRE ARCHAEOLOGICAL AND NATURAL 

HISTORY SOCIETY, 

HELD AT DEVIZES MUSEUM, August 5th, 1919. 



It had been hoped that the year of the Peace might have been marked 
by the resumption of the Society's Annual Meetings and Excursions, and 
some progress had been made in arrangements for holding a meeting at 
Salisbury at the beginning of August. The occurrence of the Peace 
celebrations, however, and the impossibility of securing accommodation 
either at Salisbury or Wilton seemed to make any attempt to hold a meeting 
in the south of the county hopeless, and the committee reluctantly abandoned 
the idea, hoping for more success next year. Accordingly, for the fifth 
year in succession a General Meeting for business only was held at Devizes 
Museum on August 5th, 1919, at which only a few members were present, 
the president, Mr. W. Heward Bell, F.G.S., F.S.A., being in the chair. 
Nine new members were elected, and the officers of the Society were re- 
appointed en bloc with the addition of Mr. Frank Stevens, F.S.A., as Local 
Secretary for Salisbury and Mr. O. G. S. Crawford, F.S.A., as a member of 
the committee. 

THE ANNUAL REPORT 
was then read by the hon. secretary. 

"Members. — The total number of members on the Society's list on July 
31st 1919, was 318, of whom 11 are life members and 307 annual subscribers. 
The total number when last year's report was issued was 321. During the 
year there have been 20 resignations and 13 deaths, whilst 30 new members 
have been elected. 

Finance. — The accounts to be published in the Magazine now due show 
that the total balance on all the Society's accounts on December 31st, 1918, 
was £257 lis. 8d., against £217 Is. Zhd. on December 31st, 1917, an increase 
of £40 10s. 4%d. on the year 1918. Of the separate accounts the general fund 
VOL. XL. — NO. CXXX. 2 F 



390 The Sixty -Sixth General Meeting* 

showed a balance of £56 12s. 2c?. an increase of £16 2s. \\\d. ; the museum 
maintenance fund a balance of £17 3s. 4c?., a decrease of £3 15s. 6c?. ; the 
museum enlargement fund a balance of £28 Os. 4c?., an increase of £12. 19s ; 
the purchase fund a balance of £91 8s. 8c?., an increase of£l9 8s. lie?. ; and 
the life membership fund a balance of £50 10s. 7c?., a decrease of £4 5s. 

Museum and Library. The hon. curator (Capt. B.iH. Cunnington, F.S.A., 
Scot.,) and Mrs. Cunnington have both been away from Devizes on war 
work for the whole of the year, and so far as the museum collections are 
concerned there are but few additions to record, the most important, perhaps 
being the La Tene I. fibula found at Charnage and presented by Mr. A. R. 
White. The Society received a request from Lieut.- Col. G. F. Ottley, the 
patron of the living of Luckington, that certain stones consisting of three 
corbels and three curious small early headstones,which were found during the 
restoration of that Church, cir. 1872, and placed in the museum, should be 
given back to the Church. As the proper place for these interesting stones 
is obviously the Church to which they belong, the committee were glad to 
accede to this request on receiving assurance that the stones should be 
carefully preserved inside the Church for the future. There have been a 
considerable number of additions to the Library. The Society owes its 
thanks to the Rev. A. W. Stote for the very complete and careful catalogue 
of a large number of Bradford Manor Deeds which have now been definitely 
presented by Mr. John Moulton. Unfortunately considerable dilapidations 
to the back portion of the premises which could not be dealt with during 
the war have now to be set right, and to meet this and other expenses 
the Society greatly needs many more annual subscriptions of 5s, or upwards 
to the museum maintenance fund, from the more recently elected members 
who have not as yet become subscribers to this fund. 

Publications. — The December number of the Magazine was published, 
though some time after its proper date, owing to difficulties in printing, 
and the same cause has delayed the June number. It is hoped, however, 
that this may now shortly be in the hands of members. It has been 
necessary in each case to cut down the number of pages a good deal below 
the pre-war standard, owing to the greatly increased cost of publication. 
In this connection an appeal has been made to our own, as to all similar 
societies, to assist in the work of re-establishing the destroyed library of 
Lou vain by making gifts of its publications for this purpose. The Society 
gladly agrees to give all its available publications. 

The Bradford Barn. — During the year 1918 the receipts from visitors' 
fees and sale of pamphlets amounted to £8 3s. lc?., and the balance on 
December 31st, 1918, was £ll 17s. 4c?., as against £8 12s. 9c?. on December 
31st, 1917. The Society greatly regrets that Mr. A. W. JST. Burder, F.S.A., 
to whose efforts the restoration of the barn was so largely due, will no 
longer be able to watch over it, as he is leaving Bradford. Mr. Ambrose 
Elton, of Bradford, has most kindly undertaken to take Mr. Burder's place 
as the local guardian of the building on behalf of the Society. 

The Annual Meeting. The committee had hoped that the Society might 
this year have resumed its annual meeting and excursions, and arrange- 
ments had gone some way for its being held at Salisbury at the beginning 






The Sixty -Sixth General Meeting. 391 

of August, when Mr. F. Stevens, F.S.A., had promised to act as the local 
secretary. The appointment, however, by the Government, of that week 
for the peace rejoicings, and the subsequent change of date to the middle 
of July, together with the impossibility of finding accommodation either 
at Salisbury or Wilton, made it hopeless to attempt a meeting in the 
south of the county, and as other centres also failed, the idea of holding 
a meeting had to be given up. It is hoped that circumstances at Salisbury 
may be more favourable next year. 

Stonehenge. The most important archaeological event of the year in 
Wiltshire was the gift of Stonehenge to the nation by Mr. C. H. Chubb, 
who by his happy and generous inspiration has brought about what archae- 
ologists throughout the country have so long desired, and has safeguarded 
the great monument as we may hope, for all time against the changes and 
chances of private ownership. It is understood that the work of securing 
the leaning stones of the outer circle will be at once begun by the Office of 
Works. " 

An appeal was read from the librarian of the John Rylands Library, 
Manchester, asking for gifts of the Society's publications towards the 
formation of a new library at Lou vain to replace that burnt by the Germans, 
and it was resolved that copies of all the publications of the Society should 
be sent, including a set of the Magazine^ complete, except for a few scarce 
numbers. The re-appointment of the Rev. E. H. Goddard as the repre- 
sentative of the Society on the Town Trust of Wootton Bassett, made 
provisionally at the last committee meeting, was confirmed. A vote of 
thanks was accorded to the Rev. A. W. Stote, for the good work he has 
done in compiling an abstract of a large number of deeds given by Mr. J. 
Moulton connected with the Manor of BFadford-on-Avon. A letter was 
read from Mr. A. W. N. Burder, F.S.A., stating that as he was leaving 
Bradford he could no longer act as the representative of the Society in the 
care of the tithe barn, and suggesting that Mr. Ambrose Elton, of Bradford, 
would be willing to take his place. The meeting gladly accepted Mr. 
Elton's offer and appointed him as the representative of the Society in this 
matter. 

Mr. A. D. Passmore drew attention to the fact that the entrance to the 
tunnel in the side of Silbury Hill, made by the Archaeological Institute's 
excavation in 1849, had recently fallen in, and that numbers of people were 
continually getting into the tunnel. He suggested that unless the entrance 
was filled up again an unsightly scar on the side of the hill would result. 
The hon. secretary was directed to write to Mr. C. R. Peers, F.S.A., the 
Inspector of Ancient Monuments, and ascertain the precise position of 
the hill with respect to the Ancient Monuments Act. Mr. Passmore also 
drew attention to the dangerous undermining of one of the supports of the 
Devil's Den at Clatford by the weather, and the hon. secretary was directed 
to make enquiries about this also. 



2 F 2 



392 



THE CHURCH SUEVEY IN WILTS, 1649—50. 
[Parliamentary Surveys, (Lambeth), Vol. XIV., &c] 

Communicated by the Ven". Archdeacon E. J. Bodington. 
{Continued from page 317). 

I. — Parochial Surveys. 

Wilts. An Inquisition indented Taken att the Cittye of New Sarum in 
the County of Wilts the two and twentyeth day of June in the year of our 
Lord one thousand six hundred and fifty before Frances Dove gent. Maior 
of the said citty of New Sarum, James Abbott gent. Thomas Hancock the 
younger gent. Barnaby Coles esq. William Coles gent, and Anthony Trotman 
gent. 

By vertue of a Commission under the Great Seale of England to them 
and others directed for the Inquirye of the Vallues of Churches Chappells 
Rectoryes parsonages, Viccariges and diuers other things in the said 
Commission mencioned within the said Countye of Wilts ; Vpon the Oatbes 
of Elyas Francis, Edward Ward, John Fricker, John Rowdon, Nicholas 
Thring, Dauid Lawes, Robert Lawes, William Smith, George Taylor, 
Edwar Collyer, Robert Blake, Jeruas Hillman, John Gye, William Snowe, 
Richard Biddlecombe, Richard Myles, Robert Wansburye, Thomas West-' 
bere, John Eue, and Henry Myles, good and Lawfull men of the hundred 
of Branch and Dole within the said Countye who present vpon their Qathes 
as followeth (vizt.). 

BRANCH & DOLE HUNDRED. 

Sarum Division. 
Wilton Burrough. Imprimis wee present that in the Burrow of Wilton 
there is a Parsonage presentative in the guift of the Right Honoble the Earle 
of Pembrooke and. Montgomery. That Mr. Richard Chandler is the present 
Incumbent serveth the Cure and preacheth constantly every Lords daye 
twice; to this Parsonage is vnited the Viccarige of Netherhampton the 
Tythes of South Burcomb Bullbridge and Ditchampton And the whole 
with the Gleabe land is of the value of one hundred and tenn pounds per 
annum. Mr. Chandler receiveth the profitts. Wee conceive it fitt that 
the Inhabitants of Netherhampton be vnited to the Church of Wilton to 
be all of that congregacion. Wee further conceive it fitt that the Inhabi- 
tants of the hamlett of South Burcomb and Vgford be vnited to the Church 
of North Burcomb and that to be a parish of Itselfe. Witnesses Elyas 
Chalke William Gray Christofer Gray Robert Reade. 

Sherington. In Sherington there is a Parsonage presentative in the 
guift of Mrs. Lambert wydowe of the value of one hundred pounds per 
annum. Mr. Robert Dyer is the present Incumbent Receiveth the proffitts 



Communicated by the Ven. Archdeacon E. J. Bodwgton. 393 

supplyes the Cure And preacheth twice every Lords daye. There is in the 
Parish noe Viccarage nor Chappell. Witnesses : — William Fashion 
Thomas Sydenham. 

Wylie. In Wylie there is a Parsonage presentative in the guift of the 
Right Honble the Earle of Pembrooke and Montgomery of the value of one 
hundred and Forty e pounds per annum. Mr. Thomas Hill receives the 
proffitts and by himselfe and his Curate preacheth once every Lords daye 
butt Mr. Hill when he comes then they preach twice. The Parsonage is 
vnder sequestracion for the delinquencye of Doctor Alexander Hide. Mr. 
Hill payeth the Fifte parte And that the Curate doth notreade such bookes 
and Orders as vsuallie come from the Parliament. Witnesses Richard 
Portriell (?) ! Jerum Potichary. 

Steeple Langford. In Steeple Langford there is a Parsonage pre- 
ventative in the guifte of Mr. Henry Myles att the next avoydance and 
afterwards in the guifte of Mr. Henry Collyer and is of the vallue of three 
hundred pounds per annum. Mr. Nathaniell Gyles supplyes the cure 
receiveth the proffitts and preacheth twice every Lords daye. The Par • 
sonage is under sequestracion for the delinquencye of Mr. Henry Collyer. 
Mr. Gyles payeth the Fifte parte. Witnesses Jerrome Mussell Richard 
Rowden. 

Winterborne Stoake. In Winterborne Stoake there is a parsonage 
impropriate and a viccarage ; the parsonage belongithe to the heires of S r . 
Edward Hungerford Knight deceased and with the Gleabe Land is of the 
value of one hundred and twentye pounds per annum. The Viccarage is 
presentative and in the guifte of the heirs of the said Sir Edward Hungerford 
and is of the value of Fortye pounds per annum consisting of small Tythes. 
Mr. Robert Maton is the present Incumbent receiveth the proffitts supplyes 
the Cure and preacheth constantly once every Lords daye. Mr. William 
Snowe hath a Porcion of Tythes of the value of Fif teene pounds per annum 
appropriated to the late Deane and Chapiter of Sarum from whom he 
holdeth the same by Lease and payeth the old Rent of Fortye shillings per 
annum to the Trustees. Witnesses : — William Snowe Anthony Kellway. 

Little Langford. In Little Langford there is a parsonage presentative in 
the guifte of the Right Honoble. the Earle of Pembrooke and Montgomerye 
of the value of three score and fiue poundes per annum. Mr. John Willson 
is the present Incumbent who receiveth the profitts and preacheth con- 
1 stantly once every Lords daye wee conceive it fitt That the Hamlett of 
; hanging Langford be vnited to Little Langford and both made one parish 
And Mr. Willson as we are informed is a sequestred Minister. Witnesses 
Sturton Sadler gent., John Wayland. 

Maydenton. In Maydenton a parsonage impropriate and in the heires 
! : of the said Sir Edward Hungerford in Fee of the value of one hundred & 
I fortye pounds per annum. Mr. William Arnold supplyeth the Cure & 
; preacheth twice every Lords day & hath for his Salarie twentye pounds per 

j 

1 This name has been altered and is not clear. 



394 The Church Survey in Wilts, 1649—50. 

annum paid out of the Parsonage. The Church is endowed with Fortye 
pounds per annum of the guifte of the said S r Edward Hungerford. There 
is a porcion of Tytb.es issuing out of the Farme of Edward Tooker esquire 
of the value of Fifteene pounds per annum belonging to the late Deane and 
Chapiter of the Cathedrall Church of Sarum held from them by Lease by 
the said Mr. Tooker ; there is no Viccarage or Chappell. And the Curate 
is no fitt man for the Ministerye. Its thought convenient that Rolston 
Madington and Shrewton be vnited and made one Parish And that Mad- 
ington be the Church and made fitt to receive the whole congregacion 
And the waye to the Church made convenient. Witnesses : — Nicholas 
Collyer Henry Myles. 

Wishford Magna. In Wishford Magna there is a parsonage pre- 
sentative in the guift of John Howe esquire of the value of one Hundred 
and Fortye pounds per annum. Mr. Robert Parker is the present Incum- 
bent who receiveth the proffitts Supplyes the cure and preacheth constantly. 
This parsonage is vnder sequestracion by the delinquencye of Mr. Bower. 
There is no Viccarige nor Chappel. Witnesses : — Thomas Netton Thomas 
Deare William Katkitfc. 

South Newton, In South Newton there is a parsonage And a Viccar- 
rige ; the parsonage is impropriated held in Fee by the said Earl of Pem- 
brooke and Montgomerie and is of the value of towe hundred and eleaven 
pounds per annum. The viccarige is presentative in the guift of the said 
Earle and is of the value of Fortye pounds per annum. Mr. Leonard Dicken- 
son supplyes the Cure preacheth constantly and receiveth the proffitts of the 
Viccarige onely. Wittnesses :— Henry Blake Dauid Blake Robert Blake 
Robert Lawes. 

Fuglestone, Bemerton, & Quidhampton. It consists of a parsonage 
presentative in the guifte of the Earle of Pembrooke and Montgomerye. And 
is of ttie value of Two hundred pounds per annum : there is a Church and 
a Chappell belongs to the Parish the church is att Fuggle stone and the 
chappell is at Bemerton. Mr. Phillip Pinckney is the present Incumbent, 
Receiveth the proffitts and preacheth constantly by him self e and Mr. 
Fawkoner his Curate twice every Lords daye att both Churches. Mr. 
Pinckney payes the Fift parte and allowes Mr. Fawconer his Curate thirty 
pounds per annum : the parsonage is vnder sequestracion by the delinquency 
of Doctor Lawrence. Wee conceive it Fitt Burton Ball Farme and two 
other households there which are of the Parish of South Newton be annexed 
to the Church of Fuggleston and made of that congregacion and that the 
church and chappell lying inconveniently to be vnited do remayne as they 
are onely that the Chappell be made a Parish Church. Witnesses: — 
Edward Poole John Gilbert alias Best Edward Ward. 

Fisherton Anger. There is in Fisherton Anger a parsonage presen- 
tative in the guift of the Lord of the Mannor which is now in controversie 
and is of the value of Four score pounds per annum. Mr. George Baylie 
supplyes the Cure Receiveth the proffitts and preacheth constantly. It is 
vnder sequestracion by the delinquency of Mr. Kent and out of it is to be 
paid the Fift parte. Witnesses : — John Lee William Croome William Sackler. 



Communicated by the Ven. Archdeacon E. J, Bodington. 395 

Shrewtou. In Shrewton there ia a parsonage impropriate and a Vicar- 
rige : the Parsonage held in Fee by Mr. Thomas Cartwright and Mr. 
Edward Masters and is of the value of one hundred pounds per annum, 
the Viccarige is presentative in the guift of the late Bishop of Sarum and 
now of the State consistinge of a yarde Land of Gleabe and small Tythes 
to the value of Fortye pounds per annum. It is vnder sequestracion and 
the Fifte parte paid out of It. Mr. Thomas Wathen supplyes the Cure 
Receiveth the proffitts and preacheth constantlie twice every Lords Daye. 
Witnesses: — William Gilbert Henry Coker. 

Orohestan Marye. There is in Orcheston Marye a Parsonage pre- 
sentative in the guift of Mr. Giles Thorneburgh who is the incumbent and 
is of the value of one hundred and Tenn pounds. There is Sixteene shillings 
yearely for quitt Rent paid out of It to the State being formerly payable 
to the Growne. Mr. Thornburgh supplyes the Cure and receiveth the 
proffitts and preacheth constantly twice every Lords Daye. Its thought 
fitt that Orcheston Marye and Orcheston George and Elson be vnited 
into one parish And that the Church be att Orcheston George and 
that the wayes bee made fitt and the Church fitt to receive the whole 
congregacion. Witnesses : — Phillip George, Edward Lavington. 

Tilshead. It consisteth of two parsonages both impropriate and a 
Viccarage the one Impropriacion is held in Fee by the Earle of Pembrooke 
and Montgomerye and the other by S 1 Ralph Hopton and is now vnder 
sequestracion the value of both is one hundred and three score pounds per 
annum ; the Viccarage is presentative Formerly in the guift of the Crowne 
and nowe of the State consisting of small Tythes of the value of thirtie 
five pounds per annum. Mr. Robert Sharpe supplyes the cure Receiveth 
the proffitts of the Viccarige and preacheth constantlye Witnesses : — 
Hugh Gie John Morthant John Ember. 

Barwyke James. It consisteth of a Parsonage and a Viccarige the 
Parsonage is Impropriate and held in Fee held by .VI r. Spatchurst and is of 
the value of one hundred pounds per annum, the Viccarige is presentative 
consistinge of the small Tythes being not worth above foure poundes per 
annum And is Indowed with a stipend of twentye pounds per annum out 
of the parsonage. Mr. Roger Powell is the present Incumbent supplyes 
the cure Receiveth the proffitt